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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Charles M. Fauntleroy (search for this): chapter 1.21
for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal
S. R. Mallory (search for this): chapter 1.21
flying the Confederate flag, before the blockaders returned to port. Later history. After this she made several successful trips through the blockade and later was transferred to other parties, and subsequently she was attacked by the enemy and destroyed at the mouth of the Ogeechee river. I am persuaded that the Federals did not know that the Nashville went into Georgetown until it was revealed to them by my capture below New Orleans in April, 1862. I had then among my private papers the rough draft of my report to Secretary Mallory, in which I had announced to him the escape of the vessel from Morehead City and her entrance into Georgetown. The Federal officer who read this report seemed to have the impression that the Nashville had sailed direct to Nassau, and so expressed himself to me. On my telling him that I had taken her into Georgetown, he was greatly surprised, and the circumstances of her escape were thus, for the first time, communicated to the Federal Government.
J. W. Pegram (search for this): chapter 1.21
Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and toucheting our departure, but one evening came to anchor near the Isle of Wight, within the limit of British jurisdiction. Captain Pegram, learning this, at once notified the government that he would set sail at a certain hour the next day, and the Tuscars we widened the distance under full steam, making safe harbor at Morehead City on the 28th day of February, 1862. Captain Pegram, after visiting Richmond and reporting to the Navy Department for instructions, returned to the ship, bringing informn of by the agent of the purchasers. General Burnside's movement upon Newbern, N. C., was then being executed, and Captain Pegram, with the officers and crew of the Nashville, went through on one of the last trains that could escape, after which
John L. Ancrum (search for this): chapter 1.21
en hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an Am
Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who carried away all that was valuable, and burned the ship. On the 21st, she arrived at Southampton, England. Our flag in England. The Nashville enjoyed the distinction of being the first war vessel to fly the flag of the Confederate States in the waters of England. Here we remained until the latter part of January, 1862. About the 1st of February, 1862, we sailed for the Confederacy, evading the United States steamer Tuscarora, which had for some time been watching an opportunity to capture the Nashville, having been sent for that purpose. The manner
Cruise of the C. S. Steamer Nashville. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, March 18, 1901.1 By Lieutenant W. C. Whittle, C. S. N. In 1861 the Nashville, then used as a freight and passenger steamer, was seized in the port of Charleston, S. C., by the Confederate authorities, and soon fitted out for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood;
t within range, and continued until I passed out, firing in all, as well as we could determine, about twenty guns. The moon rose clear and full a short time afterward and found us well out to sea, no attempt being made to pursue us that we could discover. We ran on out to the inner edge of the Gulf stream, where we remained until the next day, and in the afternoon of the 18th of March shaped our course for Charleston. Arriving in the midst of the blockading fleet there before dawn of the 19th, we discovered their position by the great number of rockets which they were sending up to signal the fact that our presence was known. This, together with the fact that the stone fleet had been sunk in the channel, leaving only the Maffits channel open, and not knowing how far even that was obstructed, made me conclude not to attempt to run in. With an exhausted crew and short of coal, I put back and ran clear of the blockaders. At daylight on the 19th I made Captain Roman, steaming close
November 19th (search for this): chapter 1.21
. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who carried away all that was valuable, and burned the ship. On the 21st, she arrived at Southampton, England. Our flag in England. The Nashville enjoyed the distinction of being the first war vessel to fly the flag of the Confederate States in the waters of England. Here we remained until the latter part o
February 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.21
e British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who carried away all that was valuable, and burned the ship. On the 21st, she arrived at Southampton, England. Our flag in England. The Nashville enjoyed the distinction of being the first war vessel to fly the flag of the Confederate States in the waters of England. Here we remained until the latter part of January, 1862. About the 1st of February, 1862, we sailed for the Confederacy, evading the United States steamer Tuscarora, which had for some time been watching an opportunity to capture the Nashville, having been sent for that purpose. The manner of our escape is worthy of mention. The Queen's proclamation of neutrality required that neither belligerant should leave port until twenty-four hours after the hour set for the sailing of the other. The Tuscarora immediately got under way and lay off the port to avoid the restrictio
October 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.21
officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on November 19th captured in the entrance of the British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who carried away all that was valuable, and burned the ship. On the 21st, she arrived at Southampton, England. Our flag in England. The Nashville enjoyed the dis
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