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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Amite River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
equal powers in directing the movements of his command. General Grierson moved slowly and with great caution on the Clinton and Port Hudson road, and succeeded in capturing a scouting party and the picket posts as far as the bridge over the Amite river, which skirts the town of Clinton. About 2 o'clock in the day, Stockdale's Battalion was ordered to make a reconnoissance in the direction of Port Hudson, and, moving from camp, halted at the Amite river to water the horses. While at the briAmite river to water the horses. While at the bridge the command was fired upon. The enemy's advance guard, under Colonel Prince, of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry, had formed across the road, about one hundred yards distant. Major Stockdale could not for the moment believe that it was the eeemy. The writer, Who had been in Grierson's lines under a flag of truce, commanded by Lieutenant Dan Williams, now a resident of Mississippi City, recognized Colonel Prince's horse, a large sorrel with white spots, plainly, and at once informed Lieutenant
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
Colonels Powers and Stockdale learned that the Fourteenth New York Metropolitan Cavalry Regiment was in camp about one-half mile further on; that it was a full regiment, numbering over 800 men, all foreigners, none of them having been in the United States three months, and they had just reached Banks' Army from New Orleans three days before. Stockdale's Mississippi battalion numbered 250 man, yet Powers and Stockdale determined to make a supreme effort and annihilate this Federal regiment. Led and his force routed, and these orders were found on his body. The Washington government then threatened to execute a number of Confederate officers in retaliation for the killing of Dahlgren and heaping indignities upon his dead body. Confederate States government retorted that the Confederate government would then hang ten officers for every man thus executed by the Federals. A major general of the United States Army was wanted by the Confederacy, and hence Captain McKowen undertook to s
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
Confederate Cavalry around Port Hudson. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, July 30, 1905. A thrilling story of Southern dash and valor told by an Orleanian who was one of the heroic horsemen. At the request of some of my army comrades, I with hesitancy attempt to give to the public a brief history of the operations of the Confederate cavalry under the the command of Colonel Frank Powers, Chief Cavalry under General Frank Gardner, who commanded in Port Hudson, during that memorable siege. It is impossible for me to write about the cavalry outside of Port Hudson without paying due regard to General Frank Gardner and the brave men under his command, who for sixty days and nights stood in the trenches suffering from hunger and thirst, with a semitropic sun beating down upon them, with sickness decimating their ranks, exposed both night and day to a terrific fire from the Federal fleet stationed in the Mississippi river above and below the fort, repelling assault after
Genesee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
s fleet, ascended the river, keeping in touch with the land forces, and proceeded to run the Port Hudson batteries. I now quote from Harper's History of the War: Farragut had to pass a line of batteries commencing below the town and extending along the bluff about three miles and a half. In the afternoon the mortars and two of the gunboats opened on the batteries. The Hartford, with the admiral on board, took the lead, with the gunboat Albatross lashed to her side. The Richmond and Genesee followed; the Monongahela with the Kineo came next, and the Mississippi brought up the rear. (Admiral Dewey, then a lieutenant, was on board of the Mississippi.) The mortars still bombarding the batteries, Admiral Farragut's ship passed without difficulty. The Richmond received a shot through her steam drum and dropped out of fire, with three of her crew killed and seven wounded. The Monongahela also dropped down the river and anchored. The Kineo, receiving a shot through her rudder post,
Raleigh (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
which was to be followed by Colonel Grierson, in a bold movement from LaGrange, Tennessee, through the State of Mississippi to Baton Rouge, La. The forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, between the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad (now the Illinois Central Railroad) and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, until he reached Raleigh, Miss.; turning then southwest to Gallatin, Miss., and within seven miles of Natchez, and then back to the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad to Hazlehurst, down to Osyka, and from that point to Baton Rouge. The only serious opposition this column met with occurred near Columbus, Miss. Colonel Hatch, with the Iowa regiment, having been detached with instructions to destroy the Mobile Railroad at Columbus, was attacked by a small Confederate force of home guards. In this fight Colonel Hatch was
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
rmed with army pistols and sabers. All other saddles having been discarded for the new McClellan trees. Enough horses were captured to mount Colonel Griffith's Arkansas troops, and to furnish mounts to many new recruits and other dismounted men. On the 27th day of May, General Banks made a terrific assault on the works at Porvery man to fall in, which he did. The officer in command of the battery hurriedly limbered up and got his battery to the front. Colonel Griffith ordered his Arkansas infantry to fall in on foot, and make a rush for the bridge, which Stockdale was still holding. Gage's and Garland's battalions were soon in the saddle and awayf Griffith, with the mounted infantry, he charged the head of Grierson's column and drove it back. Griffith deployed the Eleventh and Seventeenth (consolidated) Arkansas regiment and pushed through the woods, attacking vigorously the Federals, who had also dismounted and were fighting on foot. These Rackensacks, as Griffith love
Jackson, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
hers having been disabled by the enfilading fire from the gunboats, whose firing was incessant, both day and night. The hospitals were full of the sick, and the men in the trenches were so exhausted and enfeebled that they were unfit for action. With the fall of Port Hudson, all the Confederate cavalry were ordered to Crystal Springs, Miss. En route to that point, a courier reached camp and communicated the news to Colonel Powers that the Federals had located a camp of instruction at Jackson, La., and were recruiting a negro regiment. Colonel Powers at once retraced his steps, and by forced marches reached Thompson's creek, a few miles from Jackson, about July 25. Gage's and Stockdale's Battalions were sent around on the Port Hudson road to cut off the enemy's retreat, while Powers, with Colonel Griffith's mounted infantry, dashed into Jackson, and, although the Federals were taken by surprise, they formed and fired a deadly volley into the advancing Confederates. Adjutant Da
Woodville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
the command struck the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad it was expected that the enemy would be encountered at any moment. The column was only halted long enough to give the men and horses a few hours rest; and then it was boots and saddles, and the command was away again at a swinging trot. On reaching Summit, Miss., scouts reported that Grierson had headed for Natchez. The command then headed in a northwestwardly direction, and crossed the Homochitto river at Davis' Plantation on the Woodville and Natchez road. As this river was up, and the facilities for crossing very poor, the command was delayed several hours, thus giving Grierson time to double on his course, return to the railroad at Hazlehurst, and thence down to Bogue Chitto and then to Baton Rouge. On the 23d of May, 1863, General Banks crossed the Mississippi River opposite Bayou Sara, with an army of 25,000 men, and the next day Port Hudson was besieged on the North, while General C. C. Augur's Division of 5,000,
Homochitto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
ay, not a word of complaint was heard. As the command struck the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad it was expected that the enemy would be encountered at any moment. The column was only halted long enough to give the men and horses a few hours rest; and then it was boots and saddles, and the command was away again at a swinging trot. On reaching Summit, Miss., scouts reported that Grierson had headed for Natchez. The command then headed in a northwestwardly direction, and crossed the Homochitto river at Davis' Plantation on the Woodville and Natchez road. As this river was up, and the facilities for crossing very poor, the command was delayed several hours, thus giving Grierson time to double on his course, return to the railroad at Hazlehurst, and thence down to Bogue Chitto and then to Baton Rouge. On the 23d of May, 1863, General Banks crossed the Mississippi River opposite Bayou Sara, with an army of 25,000 men, and the next day Port Hudson was besieged on the North, while
George Meade (search for this): chapter 1.19
there was planned at Colonel Power's headquarters, by Captain McKowen, who commanded a company of scouts, an expedition for fearlessness and recklessness almost without a parallel. Captain McKowen knew not what fear was, and after obtaining permission from Colonel Powers, proceeded to at once carry out his project, which was to capture Major General Neal Dow, of the Federal Army, commanding a division in front of Port Hudson. It may be remembered that while Lee and Jackson were confronting Meade's Army in Virginia, a desperate effort was made by a cavalry division, under command of Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, to force its way into Richmond, with instructions to destroy and burn the hateful city, and not allow the rebel leader, Davis, and his traitorous crew to escape. Once in the city, it must be destroyed and Davis and his cabinet killed. Dahlgren was killed and his force routed, and these orders were found on his body. The Washington government then threatened to execute a number
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