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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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James Power (search for this): chapter 1.19
sued for several miles, many being killed and captured. The wagons were then brought back with the prisoners to Freeman's, and next day, under a guard, sent to Johnson's Army at Jackson, Miss. May 2, 1863, a courier from the front rode up to Colonel Power's headquarters and imparted to him news of great importance. Shortly thereafter, Major Stockade ordered his battalion to make preparations for a forced march. At 4 o'clock p. m., the command fell in and proceeded in the direction of Port Hug close into the Federal lines, but at no time did General Banks deem it advisable to send out another expedition against that small cavalry brigade that besieged him while he was besieging Port Hudson. About this time there was planned at Colonel Power's headquarters, by Captain McKowen, who commanded a company of scouts, an expedition for fearlessness and recklessness almost without a parallel. Captain McKowen knew not what fear was, and after obtaining permission from Colonel Powers, pro
John B. Gage (search for this): chapter 1.19
ssee Battalion, 350 men; Stockdale's Mississippi Battalion, 250 men; Gage's Louisiana Battalion, 250 men, and the Eleventh and Seventeenth Ark and make a rush for the bridge, which Stockdale was still holding. Gage's and Garland's battalions were soon in the saddle and away to the b as fighters, driving the enemy before them. Colonel Powers, taking Gage's Louisiana Battalion, and Garland's command, made a detour and strueached Thompson's creek, a few miles from Jackson, about July 25. Gage's and Stockdale's Battalions were sent around on the Port Hudson roaourth Mississippi Cavalry, Stockdale becoming lieutenant-colonel. Gage's Battalion, with Garland's and some detached companies, were mergedrteenth Confederate Regiment, Colonel Dumonteil commanding, with John B. Gage lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards these two regiments were attachassigned to duty in east Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. Colonel Gage was killed and Colonel Stockdale seriously wounded, as was Capta
es soon deployed his men, and Boone, having placed in position his guns, a spirited engagement ensued, Boore driving Grierson back upon the infantry line of battle, while General Miles held in check the enemy's infantry until nightfall. Powers dismounted most of his cavalry and fought as infantry. As night was approachiug General Miles, after removing his dead and wounded, retired within the line of entrenchments. General Augur admitted that he had three brigades—Weitzel's, Grover's and Dwight's—engaged in this action, and yet, when night closed in, Powers' cavalry were still in line near Plains Store. On the morning of May 25th, Col. Powers succeeded in placing his command outside the cotton that was then encircling Port Hudson, Banks and Augur, commanding the two investing armies, joined hands and Port Hudson was then isolated. The Ninth Tennessee Battalion did not participate in this action, having been ordered a few days before to Jackson. Colonel Powers then established hi
ensued. This was considered a brilliant affair, and one attended with great danger, as it was a night attack, clearly within the enemy's lines and against superior numbers, with the prospect of having Grierson's cavalry come in the rear, and thus cut off our only means of retreat. A million dollars worth of supplies intended for Banks' army were destroyed. The writer witnessed at Johnsonville, on the Tennessee river, in November, 1864, such another sight, when General Forrest destroyed Sherman's military supplies, together with several gunboats and many transports—a conflagration once seen never to be forgotten or effaced from the human mind. So strenuous had been these daring raids and attacks by the Confederate cavalry on the enemy, that General Banks at last concluded to take active measures to destroy or drive from his flank and rear the forces under Colonel Powers; and, to that end, placed all the Federal cavalry with a six-gun battery under the charge of General Grierson,
semble at Plains Store, and a line of battle was formed across the plank road, two six-pound howitzers being placed on this road. Colonel Stockdale, with part of Hoover's company, proceeded down the road to reconnoiter. When the Federal advance guard was met, Stockdale at once engaged the enemy, when he was almost entirely surroapped; that the command would move by fours, the ranks to be kept closed, and the men to strictly obey every order of their officers. Lieutenant Dan Williams, of Hoover's company, a penniless soldier, had command of the advance guard, with instructions to capture the videttes and pickets; the battalion being just behind, ready toof Mississippi City, recognized Colonel Prince's horse, a large sorrel with white spots, plainly, and at once informed Lieutenant Williams, who was at the head of Hoover's Company, that it was Colonel Prince, of Grierson's Cavalry. The firing now became general. Major Stockdale turned to the writer, who was in the first four, an
son batteries. I now quote from Harper's History of the War: Farragut had to pass a line of batteries commencing below the town and extending along the bluff about three miles and a half. In the afternoon the mortars and two of the gunboats opened on the batteries. The Hartford, with the admiral on board, took the lead, with the gunboat Albatross lashed to her side. The Richmond and Genesee followed; the Monongahela with the Kineo came next, and the Mississippi brought up the rear. (Admiral Dewey, then a lieutenant, was on board of the Mississippi.) The mortars still bombarding the batteries, Admiral Farragut's ship passed without difficulty. The Richmond received a shot through her steam drum and dropped out of fire, with three of her crew killed and seven wounded. The Monongahela also dropped down the river and anchored. The Kineo, receiving a shot through her rudder post, followed their example. So accurate was the fire from the Confederate batteries that the destruction
after obtaining permission from Colonel Powers, proceeded to at once carry out his project, which was to capture Major General Neal Dow, of the Federal Army, commanding a division in front of Port Hudson. It may be remembered that while Lee and Jacon of country, he made his way in the night time within the Federal lines, and after many hairbreadth escapes, located General Dow's tent, which was stealthily approached, the sentinels being secured without noise, and General Dow captured. The escGeneral Dow captured. The escape was miraculous, for McKowen had penetrated far within the Federal lines, and only succeeded in making his escape by using the greatest precaution. General Neal Dow was safely brought to camp, and next day, under an escort, sent to Richmond, Va.General Neal Dow was safely brought to camp, and next day, under an escort, sent to Richmond, Va. Be it said to the credit of both governments that retaliatory measures at no stage of the war were resorted to. It was on the 6th day of July, 1863, that the news of the fall of Vicksburg reached Port Hudson. The gun-boats on the river announ
ierson, having deployed his brigade, made an advance on the Confederate line. A sharp engagement ensued. The two howitzers were well handled, and the enemy, believing that a strong force was in their front, retired. Later in the day their cavalry made another advance, supported by infantry, and Powers was gradually forced back, but having called for reinforcements General Gardner sent out of Port Hudson Miles' Legion, 750 strong, and Boone's battery. Gen. Miles soon deployed his men, and Boone, having placed in position his guns, a spirited engagement ensued, Boore driving Grierson back upon the infantry line of battle, while General Miles held in check the enemy's infantry until nightfall. Powers dismounted most of his cavalry and fought as infantry. As night was approachiug General Miles, after removing his dead and wounded, retired within the line of entrenchments. General Augur admitted that he had three brigades—Weitzel's, Grover's and Dwight's—engaged in this action, an
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 1.19
from the howitzer exploded over their heads and the Rebel yell greeted their ears as Powers charged them. So completely dumfounded were the enemy that they hardly fired a shot, turning and driving spurs to their horses, fled for dear life, leaving forty new army wagons with four mules each standing in the road. The enemy were pursued for several miles, many being killed and captured. The wagons were then brought back with the prisoners to Freeman's, and next day, under a guard, sent to Johnson's Army at Jackson, Miss. May 2, 1863, a courier from the front rode up to Colonel Power's headquarters and imparted to him news of great importance. Shortly thereafter, Major Stockade ordered his battalion to make preparations for a forced march. At 4 o'clock p. m., the command fell in and proceeded in the direction of Port Hudson. As night approached the command turned into a plantation road, and from this road into the woods, where the command proceeded in single file to ride on in sil
ed. The negroes in camp broke and ran, but not before a large number had been killed, while the military ardor of those that escaped was cooled. Reaching Crystal Springs, Stockdale's Battalion was merged with that of Colonel Wilbourne, and from that time was known as the Fourth Mississippi Cavalry, Stockdale becoming lieutenant-colonel. Gage's Battalion, with Garland's and some detached companies, were merged into a regiment and designated as the Fourteenth Confederate Regiment, Colonel Dumonteil commanding, with John B. Gage lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards these two regiments were attached to Mabry's Brigade and formed part of Forrest's Cavalry Corps. Colonel Powers' and Colonel Griffith's Regiments were assigned to duty in east Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. Colonel Gage was killed and Colonel Stockdale seriously wounded, as was Captain James M. Ferguson, adjutant, at Harrisburg, Miss.; where many of the best and bravest of the old commands gave up their lives.
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