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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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C. C. Augur (search for this): chapter 1.19
the Mississippi river above and below the fort, repelling assault after assault from the land forces of General Banks and Augur, fighting only as Confederate soldiers could fight, and holding out even after Vicksburg had surrendered to General Grantver opposite Bayou Sara, with an army of 25,000 men, and the next day Port Hudson was besieged on the North, while General C. C. Augur's Division of 5,000, augmented by Grierson's cavalry brigade of 1,600 men from Baton Rouge, invested it on the souight was approachiug General Miles, after removing his dead and wounded, retired within the line of entrenchments. General Augur admitted that he had three brigades—Weitzel's, Grover's and Dwight's—engaged in this action, and yet, when night closMay 25th, Col. Powers succeeded in placing his command outside the cotton that was then encircling Port Hudson, Banks and Augur, commanding the two investing armies, joined hands and Port Hudson was then isolated. The Ninth Tennessee Battalion did
E. A. Mabry (search for this): chapter 1.19
of those that escaped was cooled. Reaching Crystal Springs, Stockdale's Battalion was merged with that of Colonel Wilbourne, and from that time was known as the Fourth Mississippi Cavalry, Stockdale becoming lieutenant-colonel. Gage's Battalion, with Garland's and some detached companies, were merged into a regiment and designated as the Fourteenth Confederate Regiment, Colonel Dumonteil commanding, with John B. Gage lieutenant-colonel. Afterwards these two regiments were attached to Mabry's Brigade and formed part of Forrest's Cavalry Corps. Colonel Powers' and Colonel Griffith's Regiments were assigned to duty in east Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. Colonel Gage was killed and Colonel Stockdale seriously wounded, as was Captain James M. Ferguson, adjutant, at Harrisburg, Miss.; where many of the best and bravest of the old commands gave up their lives. The memory of their proud deeds cannot die, They may go down to dust in bloody shrouds, And sleep in nameless gr
nth Tennessee Battalion did not participate in this action, having been ordered a few days before to Jackson. Colonel Powers then established his headquarters at Freeman's plantation, on the Clinton and Port Hudson road, keeping strong scouting parties in front to watch Grierson and the movements of the enemy. From this time on, s each standing in the road. The enemy were pursued for several miles, many being killed and captured. The wagons were then brought back with the prisoners to Freeman's, and next day, under a guard, sent to Johnson's Army at Jackson, Miss. May 2, 1863, a courier from the front rode up to Colonel Power's headquarters and imparteas encamped three miles away, appeared in line, with skirmishers thrown out in advance. Colonel Powers having accomplished his object, retraced his steps back to Freeman's. Grierson did not follow. This brilliant affair resulted in the total destruction of an entire cavalry regiment, the taking of 700 prisoners, including the L
Henry Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.19
r the bridge, which Stockdale was still holding. Gage's and Garland's battalions were soon in the saddle and away to the bridge, where the roll of musketry and cracking of carbines gave assurance that the enemy would be held in check. The battery, at a run, wheeled and took up position on the right side of the road and opened fire; one of the guns burst and killed three men and wounded several. The writer hastened down to the bridge, proud of the good work he had performed, when he met Henry Stuart, one of the most gallant gentlemen who ever espoused the Confederate cause, attempting to get to some place where he could get medical attention, having been seriously wounded, and ready to fall fainting from his horse, from loss of blood. The writer assisted his wounded comrade back to the surburbs, and having stanched his wound, he had the good people of the house to promise to care for him, and then returned to his command. As soon as Stockdale found that he had the support of Gri
s to be kept closed, and the men to strictly obey every order of their officers. Lieutenant Dan Williams, of Hoover's company, a penniless soldier, had command of the advance guard, with instructions to capture the videttes and pickets; the battalion being just behind, ready to charge the moment the first shot was fired by the enemy. Shortly after the battalion moved down the main road, Lieutenant Williams returned with a prisoner, a young Swede, who could only speak a few words of broken English. From him Colonels Powers and Stockdale learned that the Fourteenth New York Metropolitan Cavalry Regiment was in camp about one-half mile further on; that it was a full regiment, numbering over 800 men, all foreigners, none of them having been in the United States three months, and they had just reached Banks' Army from New Orleans three days before. Stockdale's Mississippi battalion numbered 250 man, yet Powers and Stockdale determined to make a supreme effort and annihilate this Federa
James T. Davis (search for this): chapter 1.19
n, under command of Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, to force its way into Richmond, with instructions to destroy and burn the hateful city, and not allow the rebel leader, Davis, and his traitorous crew to escape. Once in the city, it must be destroyed and Davis and his cabinet killed. Dahlgren was killed and his force routed, and these Davis and his cabinet killed. Dahlgren was killed and his force routed, and these orders were found on his body. The Washington government then threatened to execute a number of Confederate officers in retaliation for the killing of Dahlgren and heaping indignities upon his dead body. Confederate States government retorted that the Confederate government would then hang ten officers for every man thus executednted infantry, dashed into Jackson, and, although the Federals were taken by surprise, they formed and fired a deadly volley into the advancing Confederates. Adjutant Davis, a handsome young officer, of great promise, brave and fearless, was killed at the side of Colonel Powers, in front of his ancestral home. The enemy fled to
Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded of intercepting and capturing the command of Grierson. No soldiers were never more eager to meet aC. C. Augur's Division of 5,000, augmented by Grierson's cavalry brigade of 1,600 men from Baton Rou, a spirited engagement ensued, Boore driving Grierson back upon the infantry line of battle, while object, retraced his steps back to Freeman's. Grierson did not follow. This brilliant affair resusuperior numbers, with the prospect of having Grierson's cavalry come in the rear, and thus cut off directing the movements of his command. General Grierson moved slowly and with great caution on tver's Company, that it was Colonel Prince, of Grierson's Cavalry. The firing now became general. M orders to at once tell Logan and Powers that Grierson was at the Bridge. Proceeding with all has the mounted infantry, he charged the head of Grierson's column and drove it back. Griffith deploye[15 more...]
F. J. Morgan (search for this): chapter 1.19
Confederate control. Port Hudson was thus temporarily relieved. It was at this crisis that Griersons raid was undertaken, under direction of General Grant. The entire Confederate force in the State bordering on the Mississippi was then being gathered together to meet the terrific blow which Grant was preparing to strike at Vicksburg. Thus the way was open for one of those bold cavalry raids for which heretofore only the Confederates had distinguished themselves; Van Dorn, Forrest and Morgan had set the example which was to be followed by Colonel Grierson, in a bold movement from LaGrange, Tennessee, through the State of Mississippi to Baton Rouge, La. The forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, between the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad (now the Illinois Central Railroad) and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, u
Ulric Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 1.19
y be remembered that while Lee and Jackson were confronting Meade's Army in Virginia, a desperate effort was made by a cavalry division, under command of Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, to force its way into Richmond, with instructions to destroy and burn the hateful city, and not allow the rebel leader, Davis, and his traitorous crew to escape. Once in the city, it must be destroyed and Davis and his cabinet killed. Dahlgren was killed and his force routed, and these orders were found on his body. The Washington government then threatened to execute a number of Confederate officers in retaliation for the killing of Dahlgren and heaping indignities upon his deDahlgren and heaping indignities upon his dead body. Confederate States government retorted that the Confederate government would then hang ten officers for every man thus executed by the Federals. A major general of the United States Army was wanted by the Confederacy, and hence Captain McKowen undertook to supply the want. Taking with him a few trusted comrades, who, l
P. Hazlehurst (search for this): chapter 1.19
forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, between the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad (now the Illinois Central Railroad) and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, until he reached Raleigh, Miss.; turning then southwest to Gallatin, Miss., and within seven miles of Natchez, and then back to the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad to Hazlehurst, down to Osyka, and from that point to Baton Rouge. The only serious opposition this column met with occurred near Columbus, Miss. Colonel Hatch, with the Iowa regiment, having been detached with instructions to destroy the Mobile Railroad at Columbus, was attacked by a small Confederate force of home guards. In this fight Colonel Hatch was seriously wounded and his commmand dispersed. The Confederate cavalry at Port Hudson, with some mounted infantry, received marching orders on the
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