hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Samuel Gridley Howe 184 2 Browse Search
Theodore Parker 161 1 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 156 0 Browse Search
Maud Howe 128 0 Browse Search
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) 80 2 Browse Search
Julia Romana Howe 80 0 Browse Search
Samuel Ward 77 5 Browse Search
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) 74 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips 72 0 Browse Search
Ralph Waldo Emerson 68 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899.

Found 4,548 total hits in 1,852 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
John Baptist Cramer (search for this): chapter 2
severely upon the frequenters of such places of amusement, and the judgment was long spoken of with holy horror. My musical education, in spite of the limitations of opportunity just mentioned, was the best that the time could afford. I had my first lessons from a a very irritable French artist, of whom I stood in such fear that I could remember nothing that he taught me. A second teacher, Mr. Boocock, had more patience, and soon brought me forward in my studies. He had been a pupil of Cramer, and his taste had been formed by hearing the best music in London, which then, as now, commanded all the great musical talent of Europe. He gave me lessons for many years, and I learned from him to appreciate the works of the great composers, Beethoven, Handel, and Mozart. When I grew old enough for the training of my voice, Mr. Boocock recommended to my father Signor Cardini, an aged Italian, who had been an intimate of the Garcia family, and was well acquainted with Garcia's admirable m
Arthur Wellesley Wellington (search for this): chapter 2
rcia family, and was well acquainted with Garcia's admirable method. Under his care my voice improved in character and in compass, and the daily exercises in holding long notes gave strength to my lungs. I think that I have felt all my life through the benefit of those early lessons. Signor Cardini remembered Italy before the invasion of Napoleon I., and sometimes entertained me with stories of the escapades of his student life. He had resided long in London, and had known the Duke of Wellington. He related to me that once, when he was visiting the great soldier at his country-seat near the sea, the duke invited him to look through his telescope, saying, Signor Cardini, venez voir comme on travaille les Franqais. This must have had reference to some manoeuvre of the English fleet, I suppose. Mr. Boocock thought that it would be desirable for me to take part in concerted pieces, with other instruments. This exercise brought me great delight in the performance of certain trios a
oken. In the same street with us lived my music-loving uncle, Henry, somewhat given to good cheer, and of a genial disposition. In a house nearer to us resided my grandfather, Samuel Ward, with an unmarried daughter and three bachelor sons, John, Richard, and William. The outings of my young girlhood were confined to this family circle. I went to school, indeed, but never to dancing-school, a sober little dancing-master giving us lessons at home. I used to hear, with some envy, of Monsieur Charnaud's classes and of his publics, where my schoolfellows disported themselves in their best clothes. My grandfather was a stately old gentleman, a good deal more than six feet in height, very mild in manner, and fond of a game of whist. With us children he used to play a very simple game called Tom, come tickle me. Cards were not allowed in my father's house, and my brothers used to resort to the grand-paternal mansion when they desired this diversion. The eldest of my father's unma
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
m. If any one of us undertakes to set this down, he should do it with the utmost truth and simplicity; not as if Seneca or Tacitus or St. Paul were speaking, but as he himself, plain Hodge or Dominie or Mrs. Grundy, is moved to speak. He should not borrow from others the sentiments which he ought to have entertained, but relate truthfully how matters appeared to him, as they and he went on. Thus much I can promise to do in these pages, and no more. I was born on May 27, 1819, in the city of New York, in Marketfield Street, near the Battery. My father was of Rhode Island birth and descent. One of his grandmothers was the beautiful Catharine Ray to whom are addressed some of Benjamin Franklin's published letters. His father attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel in the war of the Revolution, being himself the son of Governor Samuel Ward, of Rhode Island, Governor Samuel Ward refused to enforce the Stamp Act, and also did valuable service as a member of the First and Second Co
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ington. We drove to the Indian encampment, of which I dimly remember the extent and the wigwams. A tall figure advanced to the carriage. As its door was opened, I sprang forward, clasped my arms around the neck of the noble savage, and was astonished at his cool reception of such a greeting. I was surprised and grieved afterwards to learn that I had not done exactly the right thing. The Indians, in those days and long after, occupied numerous settlements in the western part of the State of New York, where one often saw the boys with their bows and arrows, and the squaws carrying their papooses on their backs. The journey here mentioned must have taken place when I was little more than four years old. Another year and a half brought me the burden of a great sorrow. I recall months of sweet companionship with the first and dearest of friends, my mother. The last summer of her life was passed at a fine country-seat in Bloomingdale, which was then a picturesque country place, a
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
elate truthfully how matters appeared to him, as they and he went on. Thus much I can promise to do in these pages, and no more. I was born on May 27, 1819, in the city of New York, in Marketfield Street, near the Battery. My father was of Rhode Island birth and descent. One of his grandmothers was the beautiful Catharine Ray to whom are addressed some of Benjamin Franklin's published letters. His father attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel in the war of the Revolution, being himself the son of Governor Samuel Ward, of Rhode Island, Governor Samuel Ward refused to enforce the Stamp Act, and also did valuable service as a member of the First and Second Continental Congresses. He frequently served as chairman of the Committee of the Whole, during the secret sessions of Congress. His death, in the spring of 1776, is said to have been due in large measure to the fatigue caused by his incessant labors in behalf of his country. Although he did not live to sign the Declaration
Bordentown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
anger to its sacred domain. One of these was printed in a periodical of her own time, and is preserved in Griswold's Female Poets of America. Another set of verses is addressed to me in the days of my babyhood. All of these bear the imprint of her deeply religious character. Mrs. Margaret Armstrong Astor, of whom more will be said in these annals, remembered my mother as prominent in the society of her youth, and spoke of her as beautiful in countenance. An old lady, resident in Bordentown, N. J., where Joseph, ex-king of Spain, made his home for many years, had seen my mother arrayed for a dinner at this royal residence, in a white dress, probably of embroidered cambric, and a lilac turban. Her early death was a lifelong misfortune to her children, who, although tenderly bred and carefully watched, have been forced to pass their days without the dear refuge of a mother's heart, the wise guidance of a mother's inspiration. A dear old cousin of my father's, who lived to the
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
a Malibran, then known as Signorina Garcia, in the roles of Cenerentola (Cinderella) and Rosina in the Barbiere di Seviglia. Soon after this time the doors were shut, and I knew of theatrical matters only by hearsay. The religious people of that period had set their faces against the drama in every form. I remember the destruction by fire of the first Bowery Theatre, and how this was spoken of as a judgment upon the wickedness of the stage and of its patrons. A well-known theatre in Richmond, Va., took fire while a performance was going on, and the result was a deplorable loss of life. The pulpits of the time improved this event by sermons which reflected severely upon the frequenters of such places of amusement, and the judgment was long spoken of with holy horror. My musical education, in spite of the limitations of opportunity just mentioned, was the best that the time could afford. I had my first lessons from a a very irritable French artist, of whom I stood in such fear
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
air at their feet. A book of short tales and poems was often resorted to for my amusement, and I still remember how the young doctor read to me, Pity the sorrows of a poor old man, and how my tears came, and could not be hidden. The sight of Niagara caused me much surprise. Playing on the piazza of the hotel, one day, with only the doctor for my companion, I ventured to ask him, Who made that great hole where the water comes down? He replied, The great Maker of all. Who is that? I innoall his children with great solicitude, feeling, as he afterward said to one of us, that he must now be mother as well as father. My mother's last request had been that her unmarried sister, the same one who had accompanied us on the journey to Niagara, should be sent for to have charge of us, and this arrangement was speedily effected. This aunt of ours had long been a care-taker in her mother's household, where she had had much to do with bringing up her younger sisters and brothers. My
Hudson (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
I encountered great difficulty in acquiring the th sound, when my mother tried to teach me to call her by that name. Muzzer, muzzer, was all that I could manage to say. But the dear parent presently said, If you cannot do better than that, you will have to go back and call me mamma. The shame of going back moved me to one last effort, and, summoning my utmost strength of tongue, I succeeded in saying mother, an achievement from which I was never obliged to recede. A journey up the Hudson River was undertaken, when I was very young, for the bettering of my mother's health. An older sister of hers went with us, as well as a favorite waiting-woman, and a young physician whose care had saved my father's life a year or more before my own birth. After reaching Albany, we traveled in my father's carriage; the grown persons occupying the seats, and I sitting in my little chair at their feet. A book of short tales and poems was often resorted to for my amusement, and I still remember
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...