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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Phillimore (search for this): chapter 8
ily; the assurances given at that time by Bute, that his honor should be the king's honor, his disgrace the king's disgrace. The king bowing to him, stopped his complaints by observing, It is late; and as the afflicted minister was leaving him, said only Good morrow, Mr. Greenville, good morrow, Mr. Greenville, for he never called him by his right name. Whether Pitt, who had himself attained a kind of royalty, and was ever mindful to support his own majesty, Lyttelton to Royston, in Phillimore, II. 646. pleased himself with seeing the great Whig families at his heels; or, which is more probable, aware that the actual ministry could not go on, was himself deceived by his own presumptuously hopeful nature into a belief that those who made the overture must carry it through, he summoned Newcastle, Devonshire, Rockingham, and Hardwicke Hardwicke in Harris, III. 379. to come to London as his council. From his own point of view, there was no unreasonableness W. Gerard Hamilto
Israel Mauduit (search for this): chapter 8
the system adopted in the ministry of Bute, and was sure of the support of Charles Townshend. Knox, the agent of Georgia, stood ready to defend the stamp act, as least liable to objection. The agent of Massachusetts, through his brother, Israel Mauduit, who had Jenkinson for his fast friend and often saw Grenville, favored raising the wanted money in that way, because it would occasion less expense of officers, and would include the West India Islands; Grenville, in the House of Commons, in the debate of 5 March, 1770: Far from thinking the tax impracticable, some of the assemblies applied to me, by their agents, to collect this very tax. Compare Whately's Considerations, 71. Mr. Mauduit, the Massachusetts agent, favored the raising of the wanted money by a stamp duty, as it would occasion less expense of officers, and would include the West India islands. Gordon's History of the American Revolution, i. 158. and speaking for his constituents, he made a merit of cheerful subm
Boston Bernard (search for this): chapter 8
Son, September, 1763. Letter CCCLXXII. and the Earl of Hillsborough, like Shelburne an Irish as well as an English Peer, was placed at the head of the Board of Trade. One and the same spirit was at work on each side of the Atlantic. From Boston Bernard urged anew the establishment of a sufficient and independent civil list—out of which enlarged salaries were to be paid to the crown officers. And while he acknowledged that the compact between the king and the people was in no colony better ling to look up to the king for honor and authority. A permanent civil list, independent of colonial appropriations, an aristocratic middle legislative power, and a Court of Chancery—these were the subjects of the very earnest recommendation of Bernard to the British government. Answer of Francis Bernard, 1763. Esq., Governor of Massachusetts 423. Bay, to the queries proposed by the Lords Commissioners for Trade and State, Plantations; dated 5 September, King's Library, Mss. CCV. Compare
John Cavendish (search for this): chapter 8
to Grenville, 2 July, 1764. Grenville would have esteemed himself unpardonable if he could have even thought of such a measure as the stamp act, without previously making every possible inquiry into the condition of America. G. Grenville, in Cavendish, i. 494, Debate of fifth of March, 1770: I should have been unpardonable, if I had thought of such a measure (as the stamp act) without having previously made every possible inquiry into the condition of America. Sir, I had information from mewho ordered the minute, was but a cipher; and Lord North, who supported the stamp act, himself told the House of Commons that he took the propriety of passing it very much upon the authority of Grenville. Lord North's Speech, 2 March, 1769. Cavendish, i. 299. From the days of King William there was a steady line of precedents of opinion that America should, like Ireland, provide in whole, or at least in part, for the support of its military establishment. It was one of the first subjec
Joseph Reed (search for this): chapter 8
given by the officers who had been employed in America, dispelled every doubt of its ability to bear a part in the national chap. VIII.} 1763. July. expenses. Reed's Reed, i. 32. Halifax, one of the triumvirate, had had the experience of nine years in administering the affairs of the colonies, and for nearly as long had been him to that high office, and afterwards made him the confidential friend of the Earl of Egremont when Secretary of State. This is in harmony with the letter of Joseph Reed to Charles Pettit. London, 11 June, 1764: Ellis, late Governor of Georgia, * * * has had no small share in the late events. Reed's Reed, i. 32, 33. Add to thReed's Reed, i. 32, 33. Add to this, that. Immediately on the peace in 1762, Knox, who looked up to Ellis, put into Bute's hands a plan for reducing America. He also renewed the proposition which he had made chap. VIII.} 1763. July. eight years before to Halifax, for gaining an imperial revenue by issuing exchequer bills for the general use of America. But be
Charles Townshend (search for this): chapter 8
ence, in favoring the second proposal of McCulloh, we shall by and by see Charles Townshend, in the House of Commons, dispute with Grenville. I attribute to McCullorenville Papers, II. 194. The Duke of Bedford, who hated and despised C. Townshend to Temple, 11 Sept. 1763, in Gr. P. II. 121. George Grenville, came to town.t in a nebulous state, and very many of the time-serving public men, even Charles Townshend himself, were entirely at fault. The real option lay between a governmennts of the debates. and reserved his decision till a second interview. Charles Townshend to Temple, 11 Sept. 1763, in Grenville Papers, II. 121. The general idea ided. The ministry of Bute resolved to provide such a revenue; for which Charles Townshend pledged the government. Parliament wished it. Speech of Grenville, Dehe system adopted in the ministry of Bute, and was sure of the support of Charles Townshend. Knox, the agent of Georgia, stood ready to defend the stamp act, as l
Richard Rigby (search for this): chapter 8
I. 204. had no objection to a coalition of parties, and could not but acquiesce in the peace, now that it was once made; but Bedford had been his strongest opponent in the cabinet, had contributed to force him into retirement, and had negotiated the treaty which he had so earnestly arraigned. For Pitt to have accepted office with Bedford would have been a marked adoption of the peace, alike glaringly inconsistent with his declared opinions and his engagements with the great Whig families Rigby to the Duke of Bedford, 15 August, 1763, in Wiffen, II. 527, and Bedford Cor., II. 236. in opposition. So ended the attempt to supersede Egremont by Pitt, with Bedford in the vacant chair of President of the Council. For a day or two the king hesitated, and had to endure the very long and tedious speeches of Grenville on the inconvenience of sacrificing his ministry. Grenville's Diary, 19 August, Grenville Papers, II. 193. I chap. VIII.} 1763. Aug. have fully considered upon your lo
Francis Bernard (search for this): chapter 8
A permanent civil list, independent of colonial appropriations, an aristocratic middle legislative power, and a Court of Chancery—these were the subjects of the very earnest recommendation of Bernard to the British government. Answer of Francis Bernard, 1763. Esq., Governor of Massachusetts 423. Bay, to the queries proposed by the Lords Commissioners for Trade and State, Plantations; dated 5 September, King's Library, Mss. CCV. Compare on the loyalty of Massachusetts, Bernard to Sec. of Bernard to Sec. of 16 Feb. 1763, and same to same, 25 Oct. 1763. On the extension of the British frontier by the cession of Canada, and the consequent security of the interior, New-England towns, under grants from Wentworth, the Governor of New-Hampshire, rose up on both sides of the Connecticut, and extended to the borders of Lake Champlain. But New-York coveted the lands, and under its old charter to the Duke of York, had long disputed with NewHamp-shire the jurisdiction of the country west of Connecticut
Wentworth (search for this): chapter 8
o the British government. Answer of Francis Bernard, 1763. Esq., Governor of Massachusetts 423. Bay, to the queries proposed by the Lords Commissioners for Trade and State, Plantations; dated 5 September, King's Library, Mss. CCV. Compare on the loyalty of Massachusetts, Bernard to Sec. of 16 Feb. 1763, and same to same, 25 Oct. 1763. On the extension of the British frontier by the cession of Canada, and the consequent security of the interior, New-England towns, under grants from Wentworth, the Governor of New-Hampshire, rose up on both sides of the Connecticut, and extended to the borders of Lake Champlain. But New-York coveted the lands, and under its old charter to the Duke of York, had long disputed with NewHamp-shire the jurisdiction of the country west of Connecticut River. The British government had hitherto regarded the contest with indifference; but Colden now urged the Board of Trade to annex to New-York all of Massachusetts and of New-Hampshire west of the Conne
the king's counsels and presence, and Pitt's concurrence in a coalition of parties and the maintenance of the present relations with France. Bedford Papers in Wiffen's Memoirs of the House of Russell, II. 526, 527. The paper here cited by Wiffen seems not to be printed in the Bedford Correspondence. Pitt was willing to treat,Wiffen seems not to be printed in the Bedford Correspondence. Pitt was willing to treat, Grenville's Diary, in Grenville Papers, II. 204. had no objection to a coalition of parties, and could not but acquiesce in the peace, now that it was once made; but Bedford had been his strongest opponent in the cabinet, had contributed to force him into retirement, and had negotiated the treaty which he had so earnestly arraace, alike glaringly inconsistent with his declared opinions and his engagements with the great Whig families Rigby to the Duke of Bedford, 15 August, 1763, in Wiffen, II. 527, and Bedford Cor., II. 236. in opposition. So ended the attempt to supersede Egremont by Pitt, with Bedford in the vacant chair of President of the Coun
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