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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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James Otis (search for this): chapter 16
policy adopted five years later. What then? it was asked. Will the decline of British credit be remedied by turning our sea-ports into villages? Governor Bernard has been spoken of with great respect; reported the official journal. And so has Otis, rejoined the Boston Gazette; and has been compared to the Pyms, the Hampdens, the Shippens of Britain. Bernard has had some very uncommon difficulties to contend with, said royalists in his excuse. And Otis and his compatriots, retorted Samuel Otis and his compatriots, retorted Samuel Adams, have doubtless had none! no toils, no self-denials, no threatenings, no tempting baits! All the virtue is on one side; virtue was never known to be separated from power or profit. Samuel Adams under the signature of Shippen, in the Boston Gazette of 30 January, 1769; 722, 2, 1, 2 and 3. We should have been ruined by this time, had not the troops arrived, N. Rogers to W. S. Johnson, 12 Jan. 1769. wrote one who was grasping at a lucrative office. Military power, repeated the peopl
-York Assembly for 31 Dec. 1768, p. 70. Governor Moore to Hillsborough, 4 January, 1769; Compare Same to Same, 30 March, 1769, and Same to Same, 3 June, 1769. with un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctness, Andrew Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 January, 1769. Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, Jan. 1769. and appointing an intercolonial committee of correspondence. Compare R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 12 Dec. 1768. The New Year brought a dissolution Moore to Hillsborough, 24 Jan, 1769. of its Assembly; and in the new elections, the Government party employed every art to create confusion. It excused the violence of recent disputes; concealing the ex tremes of difference between the British Parliament and the American people. It sought to gratify the cravings of every interest. It evaded conflicts with the merchants, and connived at importations from Saint Eustatia and Holland. The family of the Delanceys, which had long seemingly led the Opposition in the Province
Samuel Adams (search for this): chapter 16
the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menac punish soldiers of all ranks, according to the laws of the land. Vindex, Samuel Adams, in Boston Gazette, 12 Dec. 1768. The Justices of the Peace for Suffolk at trd to Hillsborough, 24 January, 1769. in getting evidence especially against Samuel Adams; and affidavits, sworn to before Hutchinson, Copies of the Affidavits in with, said royalists in his excuse. And Otis and his compatriots, retorted Samuel Adams, have doubtless had none! no toils, no self-denials, no threatenings, no teon one side; virtue was never known to be separated from power or profit. Samuel Adams under the signature of Shippen, in the Boston Gazette of 30 January, 1769; 7to government is faction; said the friends to Government. As well, answered Samuel Adams, might the general uneasiness that introduced the reolution by William the T
Thomas Whately (search for this): chapter 16
on liable to its penalties. In letters to a member of that Parliament, Thos. Hutchinson to T. Whately, 20 Jan. 1769. whose authority he wished it made treasonable to deny,—written for public purpont. himself, to Temple, Almon's Biographical anecdotes of Eminent Men; II. 105. Biog. Of Thomas Whately. Mr. Whately showed them to Mr. Grenville, who showed them to Lord Temple, and they were seMr. Whately showed them to Mr. Grenville, who showed them to Lord Temple, and they were seen by other gentlemen. This refers to the very letter of Hutchinson above cited. Almon is good authority for what relates to Temple. and to others,—he declared that measures which he could not thin into the minds of the people, wrote Hutchinson's brotherin-law, Oliver, Andrew Oliver to Thomas Whately, Boston, 13 Feb. 1769; in Letters, &c., 30, 31. if there be no way found to take off the oriary of W. S. Johnson; Cavendish Debates, i. 191 &c. Thomas Pownall to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11 Feb. 1769. No lawyer, said Dowdeswell, will justify them; none but the House
Charles Townshend (search for this): chapter 16
wered Samuel Adams, might the general uneasiness that introduced the reolution by William the Third, or that settled the succession in the House of Hanover, be called a Faction. The patriot was in earnest. Since Great Britain persisted in enforcing her Revenue Act, he knew no remedy but American Independence. Lord North, though he feared to strike, wished to intimidate. He would not allow a Petition from the Council of Massachusetts Cavendish Debates, i. 185, &c. for the Repeal of Townshend's Act to be referred with the other American papers; nor would he receive a Petition which denied that the Act of Henry the Eighth extended to the Colonies; and on the twenty-sixth of January after a delay of many weeks, he asked the House of Commons to agree with the Resolves and Address of the House of Lords. Parliamentary History, XVI. 485, &c. Ms. Letters and Diary of W. S. Johnson; Cavendish Debates, i. 191 &c. Thomas Pownall to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11
John Morin Scott (search for this): chapter 16
hat Grafton, who was much connected with New-York, was believed to be well disposed; that the population was not homogeneous in religion, language, customs, or origin; that the Government and the churchmen acted together; that the city was a corporation in which the mayor was appointed by the king; and the reasons appear why at the hotly Moore to Hillsborough, 20 Jan. 1769. contested election, which was the last ever held in New-York under the Crown, the coalition gained success over John Morin Scott, Daniel Colden to his brother, 31 January, 1769. and the ardent Sons of Liberty. In Massachusetts Bernard kept up the ferment. He knew it to be a part of Lord Hillsborough's It is certainly a part of Lord Hillsborough's plan, &c., Hutchinson to Israel Williams, 26 Jan. 1769; and compare Bernard to Hillsborough, 4 Feb. 1769, This opinion is so sanguinely entertained, &c. &c. system that there never should be another election of Councillors, and he Postscript, Supplement to No.
Samuel Cooper (search for this): chapter 16
dish Debates, i. 185, &c. for the Repeal of Townshend's Act to be referred with the other American papers; nor would he receive a Petition which denied that the Act of Henry the Eighth extended to the Colonies; and on the twenty-sixth of January after a delay of many weeks, he asked the House of Commons to agree with the Resolves and Address of the House of Lords. Parliamentary History, XVI. 485, &c. Ms. Letters and Diary of W. S. Johnson; Cavendish Debates, i. 191 &c. Thomas Pownall to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11 Feb. 1769. No lawyer, said Dowdeswell, will justify them; none but the House of Lords who think only of their dignity, could have originated them. Suppose, said Edmund Burke, you do call over two or three of these unfortunate men; what will become of the rest? Let me have the heads of the principal leaders, exclaimed the Duke of Alva; these heads proved Hydra's heads. Suppose a man brought over for High Treason; if his witnesses do not appear,
Samuel Hood (search for this): chapter 16
s far from a solution as ever. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, Ver sailles, 24 Dec. 1768. At Boston the attempt was made to spread terror by threats of seizing the popular leaders. They expect a voyage to England against their inclination; wrote Hood, Hood to Stephens, 12 Dec. 1768. In Letters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menaces Hood to Stephens, 12 Dec. 1768. In Letters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menaces of arbitrary power, Boston Gazette, 5 Dec. 1768. pursued his system without fear or faltering. I must, said he, Boston Gazette, 5 Dec. 1768. tell the men, who on both sides of the Atlantic charge America with rebellion, that military power will never prevail on an American to surrender his liberty; and through the press he taught the public that a standing army, Vindex, in Boston Gazette, 19 Dec. 1768. kept up in the Colonies in time of peace without their consent, was as flagrant a vi
Henry Knox (search for this): chapter 16
terials, I. Mauduit to Hutchinson, 10 Feb. 1769. and Grenville himself wrote the constitutional argument. Grenville wrote from page 67 to page 86 inclusive. Knox's extra official State Papers, Appendix to Part II. page 15. I am tempted, confessed Knox, the champion of the Ministry, to deny that there is any such thing as ReKnox, the champion of the Ministry, to deny that there is any such thing as Representation at all in the British Constitution; until this notion of Representation is overthrown, it will be very difficult to convince, either the Colonies or the people of England, that wrong is not done the Colonies. Knox in Grenville Papers, IV. 336, 337. The question of British and of American Liberty was identical. TheKnox in Grenville Papers, IV. 336, 337. The question of British and of American Liberty was identical. The zeal against America was ready to sacrifice the principle of Representative Government in England; where the love of order began to find apologists for absolute Government. Whately to Grenville, 25 March, 1769; in Grenville Papers, IV. 417. While England was enforcing its restrictive corn- Chap. XXXIX} 1769. Feb. mercial
Marquis Grimaldi (search for this): chapter 16
world was alive with enthusiasm for the Americans, and with admiration for their illustrious advocates. Extract of a Letter from London, of 5 April, 1769. But Spain had been the parent of the protective system, and remained the steadfast supporter of that restrictive policy, by which, in the midst of every resource of wealth, she had been impoverished. From the first proposal of throwing colonial commerce open, she feared the contraband exportation of gold and silver. Besides; thus Grimaldi, the Spanish Minister, gave his definitive answer; the Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Feb. position and strength of the countries occupied by the Americans, excite a just alarm for the rich Spanish possessions on their borders. They have already introduced their grain and rice into our Colonies by a commerce of interlopers. If this introduction should be legalized and extended to other objects of commerce, it would effectually increase the power and prosperity of a neighbor, already too formidable
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