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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Thomas Bradshaw (search for this): chapter 16
olonies. Knox in Grenville Papers, IV. 336, 337. The question of British and of American Liberty was identical. The zeal against America was ready to sacrifice the principle of Representative Government in England; where the love of order began to find apologists for absolute Government. Whately to Grenville, 25 March, 1769; in Grenville Papers, IV. 417. While England was enforcing its restrictive corn- Chap. XXXIX} 1769. Feb. mercial system with the most jealous vigilance, T. Bradshaw to R. Sutton, Esq. 25 Feb. 1769; Treasury Letter Book, XXIV. 106. Du Chatelet continued his intercession with Choiseul, to employ Free Trade as the great liberator of Colonies. The question, he pleaded, cannot be submitted to the decision of the Chambers of Commerce. We know their principles. They regard every thing in colonial commerce which does not turn exclusively to the benefit of the Kingdom, as contrary to the end for which Colonies were established, and as a theft from th
Joseph Chew (search for this): chapter 16
numberless treasonable and seditious writings. Bernard to Hillsborough, 25 January, 1769. A few individuals stigmatized, wrote one of Hutchinson's underlings, N. Rogers [connected with Hutchinson and Oliver], to W. S. Johnson, Jan. 1769. would cause us to reform. I sometimes wish, said one of a neighboring Colony, that two thirds of the gentlemen of the law, and as great a number of the printers, had been shipped to some sandy spot on the African shore for at least seven years. J Chew of New London, Conn. While Hutchinson, eager to find proceedings Hutchinson to Israel Williams, 26 Jan. 1769. Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. amounting to treason, was taking depositions, so that the principal ac ors might be called to account, those whom he sought to arraign as traitors were aware of his designs, publicly Boston gazette, 20 Feb. 1769, 725, 3, 1. reproached him for his baseness in performing the office of an informer while he held the post of Chief Justice, and avowed their
William Pitkin (search for this): chapter 16
ce and action animated; warmed by the nobleness of his subject, he charmed all that heard him; yet the Resolutions were adopted in committee by nearly three votes to one; and the Address was carried by a decided majority. W. S. Johnson to Governor Pitkin, 9 Feb. 1769. Diary of W. S. Johnson, for Friday 27 Jan. 1769. This adoption of a vengeful and impracticable policy renewed the wakefulness of France. An attempt to seize the defenders of American Liberties, said its ambassador to Choiseulary prepossessions. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 6 Feb. 1769. While the proposals were under consideration, the state of America was again the theme of conversation in the House of Commons; Cavendish Debates, i. 207, &c. W. S. Johnson to Gov. Pitkin, 9 Feb. 1769. where once more on the eighth of February, strenuous efforts were made to prove the illegality and cruelty of fetching Americans across the Atlantic for trial. They may save themselves, said Rose Fuller, by going still further
Daniel Colden (search for this): chapter 16
much connected with New-York, was believed to be well disposed; that the population was not homogeneous in religion, language, customs, or origin; that the Government and the churchmen acted together; that the city was a corporation in which the mayor was appointed by the king; and the reasons appear why at the hotly Moore to Hillsborough, 20 Jan. 1769. contested election, which was the last ever held in New-York under the Crown, the coalition gained success over John Morin Scott, Daniel Colden to his brother, 31 January, 1769. and the ardent Sons of Liberty. In Massachusetts Bernard kept up the ferment. He knew it to be a part of Lord Hillsborough's It is certainly a part of Lord Hillsborough's plan, &c., Hutchinson to Israel Williams, 26 Jan. 1769; and compare Bernard to Hillsborough, 4 Feb. 1769, This opinion is so sanguinely entertained, &c. &c. system that there never should be another election of Councillors, and he Postscript, Supplement to No. 4, Private; Bernar
urrency, and the Government gave support to the measure. The tenantry wished to vote not by word of mouth on the nomination of their landlords, but as in New England, and the royalists professed to favor the introduction of the ballot. Above all; in New-York the old cry of No Presbyterian, gave place to that of No Lawyer. John Jay to R. R. Livingston Jr. Jan. 1769. Add to this, that all parties still hoped for an escape from strife by some Plan of Union; Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. that Grafton, who was much connected with New-York, was believed to be well disposed; that the population was not homogeneous in religion, language, customs, or origin; that the Government and the churchmen acted together; that the city was a corporation in which the mayor was appointed by the king; and the reasons appear why at the hotly Moore to Hillsborough, 20 Jan. 1769. contested election, which was the last ever held in New-York under the Crown, the coalition gained success over John Morin Scot
Du Chatelet (search for this): chapter 16
ro- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. nounced, when Du Chatelet again pressed America on the attention of Cy be brought about within a very few years. Du Chatelet to Choiseul, 9 December, 1768. Your viethem to the Court of Madrid. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 20 December, 1768. The statesmen of Frernor of Connecticut, 3 Jan. 1769. Compare Du Chatelet to Choiseul, 16 Dec. 1768. Parliament must far from a solution as ever. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, Ver sailles, 24 Dec. 1768. At Boston tppears likely to become a formidable enemy. Du Chatelet to Choiseul, London, 28 January, 1769. This letter from Du Chatelet to Choiseul, was Feb. inspired neither by the Courtiers, nor the Parlt hereditary prepossessions. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 6 Feb. 1769. While the proposals were Feb. 1769; Treasury Letter Book, XXIV. 106. Du Chatelet continued his intercession with Choiseul, tcome every day more probable and more near. Du Chatelet to Choiseul, 17 February, 1769. At the same[1 more...]
zette, 5 Dec. 1768. tell the men, who on both sides of the Atlantic charge America with rebellion, that military power will never prevail on an American to surrender his liberty; and through the press he taught the public that a standing army, Vindex, in Boston Gazette, 19 Dec. 1768. kept up in the Colonies in time of peace without their consent, was as flagrant a violation of the Constitution as the laying a tax on paper, glass, painters' colors and tea. To effect the removal of the troops fston was his unremitting care. In the mean time he sought in the common law the means to curb their insolence; and called upon the magistrates of Boston to govern, restrain, and punish soldiers of all ranks, according to the laws of the land. Vindex, Samuel Adams, in Boston Gazette, 12 Dec. 1768. The Justices of the Peace for Suffolk at their Quarter Sessions, and the Grand Jury, over which the Crown had no control, never failed to find indictments against soldiers and officers, for their fr
Richard Jackson (search for this): chapter 16
un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctness, Andrew Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 January, 1769. Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, Jan. 1769. and appointing an intercolonial committee of correspondence. Compare R. R. Livingston to R. Livingsto Postscript, Supplement to No. 4, Private; Bernard to Hillsborough, 14 Feb. 1769. and Hutchinson Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 28 January, 1769. also, most secretly See the whole of Bernard to Hillsborough, 26 January, 1769. furnished listhis associates. The wily Hutchinson opposed with all his influence the repeal of the Revenue Act; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769. recommended to remove the main Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. objection to Parliamentary authority, by the colonists of such a plan of representation in the British Parliament, as he knew they must reject; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769, and to Gov. Pownall, 29 Jan. 1769. informed against the free constitutions of Massachusetts, Connecti
ox in Grenville Papers, IV. 336, 337. The question of British and of American Liberty was identical. The zeal against America was ready to sacrifice the principle of Representative Government in England; where the love of order began to find apologists for absolute Government. Whately to Grenville, 25 March, 1769; in Grenville Papers, IV. 417. While England was enforcing its restrictive corn- Chap. XXXIX} 1769. Feb. mercial system with the most jealous vigilance, T. Bradshaw to R. Sutton, Esq. 25 Feb. 1769; Treasury Letter Book, XXIV. 106. Du Chatelet continued his intercession with Choiseul, to employ Free Trade as the great liberator of Colonies. The question, he pleaded, cannot be submitted to the decision of the Chambers of Commerce. We know their principles. They regard every thing in colonial commerce which does not turn exclusively to the benefit of the Kingdom, as contrary to the end for which Colonies were established, and as a theft from the State. To p
s do not appear, he cannot have a fair trial. God and nature oppose you. Grenville spoke against the Address, and scoffed at the whole plan, as no more than Chap. XXXIX.} 1769 Jan. angry words, and the wisdom fools put on. Lord North, in reply, assumed the responsibility of the measure; refused ever to give up an iota of the authority of Great Britain; and promised good results in America from the refusal to repeal the Revenue Act. It is not a question of one refractory Colony, cried Barre; the whole country is ripe for revolt. Let us come to the point. Are the Americans proper objects of taxation? I think they are not. I solemnly declare, I think they will not submit to any law imposed upon them for the purpose of revenue. On a former occasion, the noble Lord told us, that he would listen to no proposition for repeal, until he saw America prostrate at his feet. To effect this is not so easy as some imagine; the Americans are a numerous, a respectable, a hardy, a
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