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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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John Temple (search for this): chapter 16
ed lists of persons whose appointment they advised. They both importuned the Ministry to remove Temple, Bernard to Hillsborough, 21 Feb. 1769. Hutchinson to the Duke of Grafton. who would not conion, Boston Gazette of 6 Feb. 1769; 723, 1 and 2. The notes to the Letter from London are by Temple. that the affections of the colonists were wasting away from the mother country, from the incapacity and avarice Temple to Grenville, 7 November, 1768; in Grenville Papers, IV. 396, and compare 460. of his associates. The wily Hutchinson opposed with all his influence the repeal of the Revely sent you, &c. &c. The gentleman was Hutchinson. This confirms Almon's statement. himself, to Temple, Almon's Biographical anecdotes of Eminent Men; II. 105. Biog. Of Thomas Whately. Mr. Whateefers to the very letter of Hutchinson above cited. Almon is good authority for what relates to Temple. and to others,—he declared that measures which he could not think of without pain were necessar
Henry Moore (search for this): chapter 16
w-York completed the expression of American opinion, by unanimously asserting its legislative rights Journal of New-York Assembly for 31 Dec. 1768, p. 70. Governor Moore to Hillsborough, 4 January, 1769; Compare Same to Same, 30 March, 1769, and Same to Same, 3 June, 1769. with un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctn and appointing an intercolonial committee of correspondence. Compare R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 12 Dec. 1768. The New Year brought a dissolution Moore to Hillsborough, 24 Jan, 1769. of its Assembly; and in the new elections, the Government party employed every art to create confusion. It excused the violence of vernment and the churchmen acted together; that the city was a corporation in which the mayor was appointed by the king; and the reasons appear why at the hotly Moore to Hillsborough, 20 Jan. 1769. contested election, which was the last ever held in New-York under the Crown, the coalition gained success over John Morin Scott,
deration, the state of America was again the theme of conversation in the House of Commons; Cavendish Debates, i. 207, &c. W. S. Johnson to Gov. Pitkin, 9 Feb. 1769. where once more on the eighth of February, strenuous efforts were made to prove the illegality and cruelty of fetching Americans across the Atlantic for trial. They may save themselves, said Rose Fuller, by going still further, and bringing the question to the point of arms.—You have no right to tax the Colonies, repeated Beckford; the system has not produced a single shilling to the exchequer; the money is all eaten up by the officers who collect it.—Your measures, cried Phipps after an admirable statement, are more calculated to raise than to quell a rebellion. It is our duty to stand between the victim and the altar.—The statute of the thirty-fifth year of Henry the Eighth, observed Frederic Montagu, was passed in the worst times of the worst reign, when the taste of blood had inflamed the savage disposition of H<
Andrew Oliver (search for this): chapter 16
an abridgment of what are called English Liberties. The Letters of Gov. Hutchinson and Lieut. Gov. Oliver 16 17. He avowed his desire to see some further restraint, lest otherwise the connection won will continue to be instilled into the minds of the people, wrote Hutchinson's brotherin-law, Oliver, Andrew Oliver to Thomas Whately, Boston, 13 Feb. 1769; in Letters, &c., 30, 31. if there be Andrew Oliver to Thomas Whately, Boston, 13 Feb. 1769; in Letters, &c., 30, 31. if there be no way found to take off the original incendiaries. The Bedford Address for shipping American traitors to England having come to hand, a way was open for talking them off; and Bernard and Oliver andOliver and Hutchinson, the three relentness enemies to Colonial freedom, with the Attorney-General, were very busy Bernard to Hillsborough, 24 January, 1769. in getting evidence especially against Samuel Adas stigmatized, wrote one of Hutchinson's underlings, N. Rogers [connected with Hutchinson and Oliver], to W. S. Johnson, Jan. 1769. would cause us to reform. I sometimes wish, said one of a neig
to Grenville, 3 Dec. 1769. Another Correspondent, the same gentleman, one of whose letters I lately sent you, &c. &c. The gentleman was Hutchinson. This confirms Almon's statement. himself, to Temple, Almon's Biographical anecdotes of Eminent Men; II. 105. Biog. Of Thomas Whately. Mr. Whately showed them to Mr. Grenville, whAlmon's Biographical anecdotes of Eminent Men; II. 105. Biog. Of Thomas Whately. Mr. Whately showed them to Mr. Grenville, who showed them to Lord Temple, and they were seen by other gentlemen. This refers to the very letter of Hutchinson above cited. Almon is good authority for what relates to Temple. and to others,—he declared that measures which he could not think of without pain were necessary for the peace and good of the Colony. There must be, sAlmon is good authority for what relates to Temple. and to others,—he declared that measures which he could not think of without pain were necessary for the peace and good of the Colony. There must be, said he, an abridgment of what are called English Liberties. The Letters of Gov. Hutchinson and Lieut. Gov. Oliver 16 17. He avowed his desire to see some further restraint, lest otherwise the connection with Great Britain should be broken; and he consoled himself for his advice, by declaring it impossible for so distant a Colony
Thomas Hollis (search for this): chapter 16
l of New-York Assembly for 31 Dec. 1768, p. 70. Governor Moore to Hillsborough, 4 January, 1769; Compare Same to Same, 30 March, 1769, and Same to Same, 3 June, 1769. with un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctness, Andrew Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 January, 1769. Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, Jan. 1769. and appointing an intercolonial committee of correspondence. Compare R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 12 Dec. 1768. The New Year brought a dissolution Moore to Hillsborouwed their opinions more boldly than ever. Parliament will offer you a share in the representative body, said the royalists; and the suggestion was always indignantly spurned, since a true representation was impossible. E Compare A. Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 Jan. 1769. Boston may be deprived of its trade, thus they foreshadowed the policy adopted five years later. What then? it was asked. Will the decline of British credit be remedied by turning our sea-ports into villages? Governor Bernard
Andrew Eliot (search for this): chapter 16
ights Journal of New-York Assembly for 31 Dec. 1768, p. 70. Governor Moore to Hillsborough, 4 January, 1769; Compare Same to Same, 30 March, 1769, and Same to Same, 3 June, 1769. with un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctness, Andrew Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 January, 1769. Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, Jan. 1769. and appointing an intercolonial committee of correspondence. Compare R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 12 Dec. 1768. The New Year brought a dissolution Mooretice, and avowed their opinions more boldly than ever. Parliament will offer you a share in the representative body, said the royalists; and the suggestion was always indignantly spurned, since a true representation was impossible. E Compare A. Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 Jan. 1769. Boston may be deprived of its trade, thus they foreshadowed the policy adopted five years later. What then? it was asked. Will the decline of British credit be remedied by turning our sea-ports into villages? Gove
Thomas Pownall (search for this): chapter 16
main Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. objection to Parliamentary authority, by the offer to the colonists of such a plan of representation in the British Parliament, as he knew they must reject; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769, and to Gov. Pownall, 29 Jan. 1769. informed against the free constitutions of Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island as tending to produce another Congress; From the Draft by Hutchinson. and advised and solicited and importunately demanded such an extensi of January after a delay of many weeks, he asked the House of Commons to agree with the Resolves and Address of the House of Lords. Parliamentary History, XVI. 485, &c. Ms. Letters and Diary of W. S. Johnson; Cavendish Debates, i. 191 &c. Thomas Pownall to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11 Feb. 1769. No lawyer, said Dowdeswell, will justify them; none but the House of Lords who think only of their dignity, could have originated them. Suppose, said Edmund Burke, you do ca
Thomas Hutchinson (search for this): chapter 16
Parliament, as he knew they must reject; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769, and to Gov through proper channels, &c. &c. Whately to Hutchinson, London, 11 Feb. 1769. and communicated to GI lately sent you, &c. &c. The gentleman was Hutchinson. This confirms Almon's statement. himself, nstilled into the minds of the people, wrote Hutchinson's brotherin-law, Oliver, Andrew Oliver totalking them off; and Bernard and Oliver and Hutchinson, the three relentness enemies to Colonial fr A few individuals stigmatized, wrote one of Hutchinson's underlings, N. Rogers [connected with HHutchinson and Oliver], to W. S. Johnson, Jan. 1769. would cause us to reform. I sometimes wish, syears. J Chew of New London, Conn. While Hutchinson, eager to find proceedings Hutchinson to ll to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11 Feb. 1769. No lawyer, said Dowdeswell, wde furnished the materials, I. Mauduit to Hutchinson, 10 Feb. 1769. and Grenville himself wrote t[12 more...]
Gayarreas Hist (search for this): chapter 16
, the hand of power must be lifted up, and the whole force of this country exerted to bring the Colonies into subjection. The Resolutions condemned the Assembly of Massachusetts, its Council, and still more its Convention; approved of sending a military force to Boston; and foreshadowed the abrogation of the municipal liberties of that town, and the intended change in the Charter of the Province. Hillsborough was seconded by Bedford, who also moved an Address to the King, Parliamentary Hist. XVI. 479, 480. to bring to condign punishment the chief authors and instigators of the late disorders; and if sufficient ground should be seen, to put them on trial for treason before a special Commission in England, pursuant to the provisions of the statute of the Thirty-fifth year of King Henry the Eighth. The Resolutions and Address were readily adopted, with no opposition except from Richmond and Shelburne. The policy of the Administration deceived neither France nor America. Under t
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