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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8. Search the whole document.

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Thomas Paine (search for this): chapter 9
a sufficiently plausible appearance of patriotism, it approved the military association of all who had no scruples about bearing arms, adopted rules for the volunteer battalions, and before its adjournment appropriated eighty thousand pounds in provincial paper money to defray the expenses of a military preparation. The insincerity of the concessions was perceived; extreme discontent led the more determined to expose through the press the trimming of the assembly; and Franklin encouraged Thomas Paine, an emigrant from England of the previous year, who was the master of a singularly lucid and attractive style, to write an appeal to the people of America in favor of independence. Moreover the assembly in asserting the inviolability of the proprietary form of government, which had originally emanated from a king, placed itself in opposition to the principle of John Rutledge, John Adams, and the continental congress, that the people are the source and original of all power. That princ
John Johnson (search for this): chapter 9
ll ships employed as carriers for the British fleet or army; and sanctioned tribunals instituted in the separate colonies to confiscate their cargoes. The captures already made under the authority of Washington they confirmed. To meet the further expenses of the war, they voted bills of credit to the amount of three millions more. A motion by Chase of Maryland to send envoys to France with conditional instructions did not prevail; but on the twenty ninth of November Harrison, Franklin, Johnson, Dickinson, and Jay were appointed a secret committee for the sole purpose of corresponding with friends in Great Britain, Ireland, and other parts of the world; and funds were set aside for the payment of such agents as they might send on this service. It is an immense misfortune to the whole empire, wrote Jefferson to a Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. refugee, to have a king of such a disposition at such a time. We are told, and every thing proves it true, that he is the bitterest enemy we ha
ss the appointment of prize courts for the condemnation of prizes; the legislature of Massachusetts, without waiting for further authority, of themselves, in an act drawn by Elbridge Gerry to encourage the fitting out of armed vessels, instituted such tribunals. The king's silly proclamation will put an end to petitioning, wrote James Warren, the speaker, to Samuel Adams; movements worthy of your august body are expected; a declaration of independence, and treaties with foreign powers. Hawley was the first to discern through the darkness the coming national government of the republic, even while it still lay far below the horizon; and he wrote from Watertown to Samuel Adams: The eyes of all the continent are fastened on your body, to see whether you act with firmness and intrepidity, with the spirit and dispatch which our situation calls for; it is time for your body to fix on periodical annual elections—nay, to form into a parliament of two houses. The first day of November b
Haldimand (search for this): chapter 9
tion about the state of the colonies. The king, on whose decision neither the petition nor its bearer had the slightest influence, would not see him. The king and his Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Aug. cabinet, said Suffolk, are determined to listen to nothing from the illegal congress, to treat with the colonies only one by one, and in no event to recognise them in any form of association. The Americans, reasoned Sandwich, will soon grow weary, and Great Britain will subject them by her arms. Haldimand, who had just arrived, owned that nothing but force would bring the Americans to reason. Resolvedly blind to consequences, George the Third scorned dissimulation, and eagerly showed his determination, such were his words, to prosecute his measures, and force the deluded Americans into submission. He chid Lord North for the delay in framing a proclamation declaring the Americans rebels, and forbidding all intercourse with them. He was happier than his minister; he had no misgivings that
the assembly in asserting the inviolability of the proprietary form of government, which had originally emanated from a king, placed itself in opposition to the principle of John Rutledge, John Adams, and the continental congress, that the people are the source and original of all power. That principle had just been applied on the memorial of New Hampshire with no more than one dissenting vote. Yet the men of that day had been born and educated as subjects of a king; to them the house of Hanover was a symbol of religious toleration, the British constitution another word for the security of liberty and property under a representative government. They were not yet enemies of monarchy; they had as yet turned away from considering whether well or- Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. ganized civil institutions could be framed for wide territories without a king; and in the very moment of resistance they longed to escape the necessity of a revolution. Zubly, a delegate from Georgia, a Swiss by b
Richard Penn (search for this): chapter 9
The king and the second petition of congress. August, September, in Europe. November in America—1775. The zeal of Richard Penn appeared from his Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Aug. celerity. Four days after the petition to the king had been adopted by con parliament. The progress of these discussions was closely watched by the agents of France. Its ambassador, just after Penn's arrival, wrote of the king and his ministers to Vergennes: These people appear to me in a delirium; that there can be noonents. It was known that, two days before the king issued his proclamation, his secretary of state had received from Richard Penn a copy of the second petition of congress; and that Penn and Arthur Lee, who had pressed earnestly to obtain an answerPenn and Arthur Lee, who had pressed earnestly to obtain an answer, had been told that as his majesty did not receive it on the throne, no answer would be given. The proclamation included Dickinson among the dangerous and designing men, rebels and traitors, whom the civil and military officers were ordered to brin
James Warren (search for this): chapter 9
, manned them with sea captains and sailors from his camp, and sent them to take vessels laden with soldiers or stores for the British army, now urged on congress the appointment of prize courts for the condemnation of prizes; the legislature of Massachusetts, without waiting for further authority, of themselves, in an act drawn by Elbridge Gerry to encourage the fitting out of armed vessels, instituted such tribunals. The king's silly proclamation will put an end to petitioning, wrote James Warren, the speaker, to Samuel Adams; movements worthy of your august body are expected; a declaration of independence, and treaties with foreign powers. Hawley was the first to discern through the darkness the coming national government of the republic, even while it still lay far below the horizon; and he wrote from Watertown to Samuel Adams: The eyes of all the continent are fastened on your body, to see whether you act with firmness and intrepidity, with the spirit and dispatch which our
ust, September, in Europe. November in America—1775. The zeal of Richard Penn appeared from his Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Aug. celerity. Four days after the petition to the king had been adopted by con to apprehend that such rebellion Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Aug. hath been much promoted and encouraged byarged with the sole care of their Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. little brood of children; managing their o longer parent state, but tyrant Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. state, and these colonies. Let us separament of Pennsylvania. The legis- Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. lature of that colony was in session; it rd, and preparing for Dickinson a Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. life of regrets. Had it done no more thafrom considering whether well or- Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. ganized civil institutions could be framea better hope of unanimity. They Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. became more resolute, more thorough, and hole empire, wrote Jefferson to a Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. refugee, to have a king of such a disposi[5 more...]
November 29th (search for this): chapter 9
nhabitants of the colonies to seize all ships employed as carriers for the British fleet or army; and sanctioned tribunals instituted in the separate colonies to confiscate their cargoes. The captures already made under the authority of Washington they confirmed. To meet the further expenses of the war, they voted bills of credit to the amount of three millions more. A motion by Chase of Maryland to send envoys to France with conditional instructions did not prevail; but on the twenty ninth of November Harrison, Franklin, Johnson, Dickinson, and Jay were appointed a secret committee for the sole purpose of corresponding with friends in Great Britain, Ireland, and other parts of the world; and funds were set aside for the payment of such agents as they might send on this service. It is an immense misfortune to the whole empire, wrote Jefferson to a Chap. XLIX.} 1775. Nov. refugee, to have a king of such a disposition at such a time. We are told, and every thing proves it true,
m of government, as, in their judgment, will best produce the happiness of the people, and most effectually secure peace and good order in the province, during the continuance of the present dispute between Great Britain and the colonies. On the fourth the same advice was extended to South Carolina. Here was, indeed, the daybreak of revolution; two peoples were summoned to come together and create governments with a single view to their own happiness. A limit seemed to be set to the duration still confided in his integrity, by loyalists who looked upon him as their last hope, by the Quakers who knew his regard for peace, by the proprietary party, whose cause he had always espoused. Now was the crisis of his fame. That body, on the fourth, elected nine delegates to the continental congress. Of these one was too ill to serve; of the rest, Franklin stood alone as the unhesitating champion of independence; the majority remained to the last its unyielding opponents. It was known tha
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