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Crompond (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
d with loud cries calling him their father. Pressing the hand of Dumas, he said to him: We may be beaten by the English in the field; it is the lot of arms: but see there the army which they will never conquer. At this very time Andre, conducted by Smith, crossed the Hudson river at King's ferry. It was already dark before they passed the American post at Verplanck's point under the excuse that they were going up the river, and to keep up that pretence they turned in for the night near Crompond. Very 23. early on the twenty-third, they were in the saddle. Two miles and a half north of Pine's Bridge, over the Croton, Smith, assuring Andre that the rest of the way he would meet only British parties, or cow boys as they were called, and having charged him to take the inner route to New York through the valley of the Bronx by way of White Plains, near which the British had an outpost, bade him farewell and rode up to Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 23. dine with Arnold at his quarters
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
forwarded to Arnold, he determined to go as far as Dobbs Ferry and meet the flag. As he was approaching the vessel in which Andre came up the river, the British guard-boats whose officers were not in the secret fired upon his barge and prevented the interview. Clinton became only more interested in the project, for of a sudden he gained a great fellow-helper. At the breaking out of the war between France and England, Sir George Rodney, a British naval officer, chanced to be detained in Paris by debt. But the aged Marshal de Biron advanced him money to set himself free, and he hastened to England to ask employment of the king. He was not a member of parliament, and was devoted to no political party; he reverenced the memory of Chatham, and yet held the war against the United States to be just. A man of action, quick-sighted, great in power of execution, he was just the officer whom a wise government would employ, and whom by luck the British admiralty of that day, tired of th
West Indies (search for this): chapter 19
mutinous and the incompetent, put in command of the expedition that was to relieve Gibraltar and rule the seas of the West Indies. One of the king's younger sons served on board his fleet as midshipman. He took his squadron to sea on the twenty-niictualled the garrison of Gibraltar, and relieved Minorca, on the thirteenth Feb. 13. of February he set sail for the West Indies. At St. Lucie he received letters from his wife, saying: Everybody is beyond measure delighted as well as astonished n-chief. Time pressed on. Besides; Sir George Rodney had only looked in upon New York, and would soon return to the West Indies. On the evening of the eighteenth, Arnold, giving information that Washing- Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 18. ton on th Chap. XVIII.} 1780. and eventually their names were placed on the pension list. Sir George Rodney returned to the West Indies, and, so far as related to himself, let the unsuccessful conspiracy sink into oblivion. For Clinton, the cup of humil
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
my life, but the lives of the troops under my command, are entirely devoted to their service. Washington in general orders desired the American officers to wear white and black cockades as a symbol of affection for their allies. The British fleet at New York having received a large re-enforcement, so that it had now a great superiority, Sir Henry Clinton embarked about eight thousand men for an expedition against the French in Rhode Island. Supported by militia from Massachusetts and Connecticut, the French longed for the threatened attack; but the expedition proceeded no further than Huntington Bay in Long Island, where it idled away several days, and then returned to New York. Of the incapacity of Arbuthnot, the admiral, Clinton sent home bitter complaints, which were little heeded. There were those who censured the general as equally wanting energy. The sixth summer during which the British had vainly endeavored to reduce the United States was passing away, and after the ar
Dobbs Ferry (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
of intelligence. On the same day, Andre, disguising his name, wrote to Sheldon from Chap. XVIII.} 1780. New York by order of Clinton: A flag will be sent to Dobbs Ferry on Monday next, the eleventh, at twelve o'clock. Let me entreat you, sir, to favor a matter which is of so private a nature that the public on neither side can uce, and lull the suspicions of the American officer by statements the most false. The letter of Andre being forwarded to Arnold, he determined to go as far as Dobbs Ferry and meet the flag. As he was approaching the vessel in which Andre came up the river, the British guard-boats whose officers were not in the secret fired upon sh the dangers to which the service exposed him, the commanderin-chief, before his departure, cautioned him not to change his dress, and not to take papers. At Dobbs Ferry, he embarked on the river, and, as the tide was favorable, reached the Vulture at about an hour after sunset, and declared to its captain that he was ready to a
Tarrytown (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
he Croton, Andre, quitting the road to White Plains, took that which led over the hills and entered the highway from Albany to New York at a short distance above Tarrytown. He now thought himself beyond all danger, and according to his own account he believed himself to be the bearer of a plan that would bring the civil war to an ons to New York, or otherwise doing service to the British. On that morning, after setting a reserve of four to keep watch in the rear, he and David Williams of Tarrytown and Isaac van Wart of Greenburg seated themselves in the thicket by the wayside, just above Tarrytown, and whiled away the time by playing cards. At an hour befTarrytown, and whiled away the time by playing cards. At an hour before noon, Andre was just rising the hill out of Sleepy Hollow, within fifteen miles of the strong British post at King's Bridge, when Paulding got up, presented a firelock at his breast, and asked which way he was going. Full of the idea that he could meet none but friends to the English, he answered: Gentlemen, I hope you belong
Clinton, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
e winter of 1778-1779, he was taken into the pay of Clinton, to whom he gave on every occasion most material in cheerfully submitted to. Lord George Germain to Clinton, 27 Sept., 1779. Extract. It will not, I am persua Germain was, no doubt, cognizant of the plot; for Clinton, who was too prudent to communicate it in official d a flag of truce. This letter of Arnold reached Clinton on Tuesday 19. evening, and he took his measures whe unsuccessful conspiracy sink into oblivion. For Clinton, the cup of humiliation was filled to the brim. Th: The proceedings of the American court of inquiry; Clinton's elaborate letters to Lord George Germain of 11 anTwo letters of Clinton to Germain of 12 Oct., 1780; Clinton's secret letter of 30 Oct., 1780; Clinton's report Clinton's report to Lord Amherst of 16 Oct., 1780; Extract from Clinton's Journal in Mahon's England, VII., Appendix VII. to XIere is an extract of an order of the subordinate of Clinton, which met his acquiescent approval, and which he f
White Plains (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
s Bridge, over the Croton, Smith, assuring Andre that the rest of the way he would meet only British parties, or cow boys as they were called, and having charged him to take the inner route to New York through the valley of the Bronx by way of White Plains, near which the British had an outpost, bade him farewell and rode up to Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 23. dine with Arnold at his quarters. At a fork in the road about six miles below the Croton, Andre, quitting the road to White Plains, took White Plains, took that which led over the hills and entered the highway from Albany to New York at a short distance above Tarrytown. He now thought himself beyond all danger, and according to his own account he believed himself to be the bearer of a plan that would bring the civil war to an immediate end. The British troops, embarked by Sir George Rodney, lay waiting for Clinton to give the word and to lead them in person. It happened that John Paulding, a poor man, then about forty-six years old, a zealous p
St. Clair, Mich. (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ved no support from Sir Henry Clinton. Andre was without loss of time conducted to the headquarters of the army at Tappan. His offence was so clear that it would have justified the promptest action; but, to prevent all possibility of complaint from any quarter, he was, on the twenty-ninth, brought before a numerous and very able board of 29. officers. On his own confession and without the examination of a witness, the board, on which sat Greene, second only to Washington in the service; St. Clair, afterwards president of congress; Lafayette, of the French army; Steuben, from the staff of Frederic the Second; Parsons, Clinton, Glover, Knox, Huntingdon, and others, all well known for their uprightness,—made their unanimous report that Major Andre, adjutant-general of the British army, ought to be considered as a spy from the enemy and to suffer death. Throughout the inquiry Andre was penetrated with the liberality of the members of the court, who showed him every mark of indulgence,
Gibraltar (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
officer whom a wise government would employ, and whom by luck the British admiralty of that day, tired of the Keppels and the Palisers, the Chap. XVIII.} 1780. mutinous and the incompetent, put in command of the expedition that was to relieve Gibraltar and rule the seas of the West Indies. One of the king's younger sons served on board his fleet as midshipman. He took his squadron to sea on the twenty-ninth of December, 1779. On the eighth of January, 1780, Jan. 8. he captured seven vessel of war and fifteen sail of merchantmen. On the sixteenth, he encountered off 16. Cape St. Vincent, the Spanish squadron of Languara, very inferior to his own, and easily took or destroyed a great part of it. Having victualled the garrison of Gibraltar, and relieved Minorca, on the thirteenth Feb. 13. of February he set sail for the West Indies. At St. Lucie he received letters from his wife, saying: Everybody is beyond measure delighted as well as astonished at your success; from his daugh
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