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Huntington Bay (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
n in general orders desired the American officers to wear white and black cockades as a symbol of affection for their allies. The British fleet at New York having received a large re-enforcement, so that it had now a great superiority, Sir Henry Clinton embarked about eight thousand men for an expedition against the French in Rhode Island. Supported by militia from Massachusetts and Connecticut, the French longed for the threatened attack; but the expedition proceeded no further than Huntington Bay in Long Island, where it idled away several days, and then returned to New York. Of the incapacity of Arbuthnot, the admiral, Clinton sent home bitter complaints, which were little heeded. There were those who censured the general as equally wanting energy. The sixth summer during which the British had vainly endeavored to reduce the United States was passing away, and after the arrival of French auxiliaries the British commander-in-chief was more than ever disheartened. On the twe
Hudson (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
rseverance in enduring the rigors of military service is not to be expected from those who are not by profession obliged to it. Our force, from your own observation, is totally inadequate to our safety. Washington to the committee in camp in Marshall, i. 362. On the nineteenth of June, two days after his 19. arrival in New York, Clinton repaired to New Jersey. He had now at his disposition nearly four times as many regular troops as were opposed to him; but he fretted at the move in Jersey as premature, and what he least expected. Ms. note of Clinton to Stedman's History, II. 213. With civil words to the German officers, he resolved to give up the expedition; but he chose to mask his retreat by a feint, and to give it the air of a military manoeuvre. Troops sent up the Hudson river as if to take the Americans in the rear induced Washington to move his camp to Rockaway bridge, confiding the post at Short Hills to two brigades under the command of Greene. Early on the twen
North River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
where he vexed the weak Admiral Arbuthnot by taking command of the station of New York during his short stay. To the vast superiority of the British on land, was now added the undisputed dominion of the water. In aid of the enterprise by which Sir Henry Clinton expected to bring the war to an immediate close, Rodney contributed his own rare powers; and perfect harmony prevailed between the two branches of the service. On the eighteenth of September, Washington Sept. 18. crossed the North River on his way from headquarters near Tappan to Hartford, where, attended by Lafayette and Hamilton, he was to hold his first interview with General Rochambeau. He was joined on the river by Arnold, who accompanied him as far as Peekskill, and endeavored, though in vain, to obtain his consent for the reception of an agent on pretended business relating to confiscated property. Had the consent been given, the interview with Andre would have taken place under a flag of truce, seemingly author
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
alty as the reason, that his flag had not been properly supported by some of his officers. With indifference to neutral rights, he sent frigates to seize or destroy all American vessels in St. Eustatius. In June, he received a check by a Junc- June. tion of the Spanish squadron under Solano with the Chap. XVIII.} 1780. French. But the two admirals could not agree how their forces should be employed. Contagious fever attacked the Spaniards, and reached the French. Solano returned to Havana; Guichen, whose squadron was anxiously awaited in the north, sailed for France. Rodney alone, passing to the north and recapturing a ship from Charleston, anchored off Sandy Hook, where he vexed the weak Admiral Arbuthnot by taking command of the station of New York during his short stay. To the vast superiority of the British on land, was now added the undisputed dominion of the water. In aid of the enterprise by which Sir Henry Clinton expected to bring the war to an immediate close, Ro
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
the penalty of death, he used these threats: I shall think myself bound by every tie of duty and honor to retaliate on such unhappy persons of your army as may fall within my Chap. XVIII.} 1780. power. Forty of the principal inhabitants of South Carolina have justly forfeited their lives; Sir Henry Clinton cannot in justice extend his mercy to them any longer, if Major Andre suffers. Meantime Andre entreated with touching earnestness that he might not die on the gibbet. Washington and evethe gallows. At the beginning of the war, their officers in America threatened the highest American officers and statesmen with the cord. It was the only mode of execution authorized by them. Under the orders of Clinton, Lord Cornwallis in South Carolina had set up the gallows for those whom he styled deserters, without regard to rank. Neither the sentence of the court nor the order of Washington names death on the gallows; the execution took place in the manner that was alone in use on both
Hudson River (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ays after his 19. arrival in New York, Clinton repaired to New Jersey. He had now at his disposition nearly four times as many regular troops as were opposed to him; but he fretted at the move in Jersey as premature, and what he least expected. Ms. note of Clinton to Stedman's History, II. 213. With civil words to the German officers, he resolved to give up the expedition; but he chose to mask his retreat by a feint, and to give it the air of a military manoeuvre. Troops sent up the Hudson river as if to take the Americans in the rear induced Washington to move his camp to Rockaway bridge, confiding the post at Short Hills to two brigades under the command of Greene. Early on the twenty-third, the British Chap. XVIII.} 1780. June 23. advanced in two compact divisions from Elizabethtown Point to Springfield. The column on the right had to ford the river before they could drive Major Lee from one of the bridges over the Passaic. At the other, Colonel Angel with his regiment he
Hudson River (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
in Haverstraw bay, promising on Wednesday evening to send a person on board with a boat and a flag of truce. This letter of Arnold reached Clinton on Tuesday 19. evening, and he took his measures without delay. Troops were embarked on the Hudson river under the superintendence of Sir George Rodney, and the embarkation disguised by a rumor of an intended expedition into the Chesapeake. On the morning of the twentieth, the British ad- 20. jutant-general, taking his life in his hand, prepam their father. Pressing the hand of Dumas, he said to him: We may be beaten by the English in the field; it is the lot of arms: but see there the army which they will never conquer. At this very time Andre, conducted by Smith, crossed the Hudson river at King's ferry. It was already dark before they passed the American post at Verplanck's point under the excuse that they were going up the river, and to keep up that pretence they turned in for the night near Crompond. Very 23. early on th
Greensburg (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
happened that John Paulding, a poor man, then about forty-six years old, a zealous patriot who had served his country from the breaking out of the war, and had twice suffered captivity, had lately escaped from New York and had formed a little corps of partisans to annoy roving parties, taking provisions to New York, or otherwise doing service to the British. On that morning, after setting a reserve of four to keep watch in the rear, he and David Williams of Tarrytown and Isaac van Wart of Greenburg seated themselves in the thicket by the wayside, just above Tarrytown, and whiled away the time by playing cards. At an hour before noon, Andre was just rising the hill out of Sleepy Hollow, within fifteen miles of the strong British post at King's Bridge, when Paulding got up, presented a firelock at his breast, and asked which way he was going. Full of the idea that he could meet none but friends to the English, he answered: Gentlemen, I hope you belong to our party? Which party? ask
Staten Island (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ugh it was drawn up and began a heavy cannonade, had no design to engage; and at four in the afternoon, after burning the houses in Springfield, it began its return. All the way back to Elizabethtown, it was annoyed by an incessant fire from American skirmishers and militia. Its total loss is not known; once more the Hessian yagers lost fifty in killed or wounded, among the latter one colonel, two captains, and a lieutenant. From Elizabethtown Point the fruitless expedition crossed to Staten Island by a bridge of boats, which at midnight was taken away. Clinton was never again to have so good an opportunity for offensive operations as that which he had now rejected. On the return of d'estaing from America, he urged the French ministry to send twelve thousand men to the United States, as the best way of pursuing the war actively; and Lafayette had of his own motion given the like advice to Vergennes, with whom he had formed relations of friendship. The cabinet adopted the measu
Haverstraw (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
his safety and success. The moon, which had just passed into the third quarter, shone in a clear sky when the boat pushed for the landing-place near the upper edge of the Haverstraw mountains. It was very near the time for day to appear, when Andre, dressed in regimentals, which a large blue cloak concealed, landed at the point of the Long Clove, where Arnold was waiting in the bushes to receive him. The general had brought with him a spare horse; and the two rode through the village of Haverstraw within the American lines to the house of Smith, which lay a few miles from the river. At the dawn of day, the noise of artillery was heard. An American party had brought field-pieces to bear on the Vulture; and Arnold, as he looked out from the window, saw her compelled to shift her anchorage. The negotiations of the two parties continued for several hours. Clinton was in person to bring his army to the siege of Fort Defiance, which enclosed about seven acres of land. The garrison wa
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