hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
France (France) 516 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 454 0 Browse Search
Virginia Washington 326 0 Browse Search
Vergennes 289 5 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 206 0 Browse Search
Greene 194 6 Browse Search
Henry Clinton 189 23 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 170 0 Browse Search
William Franklin 166 0 Browse Search
1780 AD 160 160 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

Found 580 total hits in 147 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Hamilton, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
shonorable, as no motive could be mine but the service of my king, and as I was unvoluntarily an impostor. This request was granted in its full extent, and in the whole progress of the affair he was treated with the most scrupulous delicacy. Hamilton's Account of Arnold's Affair, in Works, i. 176. Andre further wrote: Gentlemen at Charleston on parole were engaged in a conspiracy against us; they are objects who may be set in exchange for me, or are persons whom the treatment I receive mightClinton's report to Lord Amherst of 16 Oct., 1780; Extract from Clinton's Journal in Mahon's England, VII., Appendix VII. to XI.; Journal of General Matthews; Trial of Joshua Hett Smith, edited by Henry B. Dawson, New York, 1866; and especially Hamilton's Account of Andreas Affair in Works, i. 172-182. This last is particularly valuable, as Hamilton had the best opportunities to be well informed; and in his narrative, if there are any traces of partiality, it is towards Andre that he leaned.
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ernay with a squadron of ten Chap. XVIII.} 1780. July 10. ships of war, three of them ships of the line, convoyed the detachment of about six thousand men with Rochambeau into the harbor of Newport. To an address from the general assembly of Rhode Island, then sitting in Newport, the count answered: The French troops are restrained by the strictest discipline; and, acting under General Washington, will live with the Americans as their brethren. I assure the general assembly that, as brethren, symbol of affection for their allies. The British fleet at New York having received a large re-enforcement, so that it had now a great superiority, Sir Henry Clinton embarked about eight thousand men for an expedition against the French in Rhode Island. Supported by militia from Massachusetts and Connecticut, the French longed for the threatened attack; but the expedition proceeded no further than Huntington Bay in Long Island, where it idled away several days, and then returned to New York
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
em an den Generallieutenant von Kniephausen ├╝bertrage nen Commando ereignet hat. The refugees insisted that the men of New Jersey, weary Chap. XVIII.} 1780. May. of compulsory requisitions of supplies, longed to return to their old form of governmld desert to the English and the other half disperse. The moment seemed opportune for setting up the royal standard in New Jersey. Strengthening the post at Kingsbridge, and leaving only three regiments in New York, Knyphausen formed nineteen regimar the several states would comply with the requisitions made on them. While awarding liberal praise to the militia of New Jersey, he renewed his constant plea for regular troops: Perseverance in enduring the rigors of military service is not to be mp in Marshall, i. 362. On the nineteenth of June, two days after his 19. arrival in New York, Clinton repaired to New Jersey. He had now at his disposition nearly four times as many regular troops as were opposed to him; but he fretted at the
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
o have inspired his people with his own patriotic zeal. A British soldier, putting his gun to Chap. XVIII.} 1780 June. the window of the house where Caldwell's wife was sitting with her children, one of them a nursling, shot her fatally through the breast. Scarcely was time allowed to remove the children and the corpse from the house when it was set on fire. The presbyterian meeting-house and the houses and barns of the village were burned down. In the winter the presbyterian church at Newark had in like manner been burned to the ground. From Connecticut Farms, Maxwell, with the remnant of a brigade, retreated to strong ground near Springfield, where he awaited and repelled repeated attacks made by Colonel Wurmb with a Hessian regiment. Thrice did the Americans charge with fixed bayonets; and they retired only on the arrival of a British brigade, the Hessian yagers alone having lost more than fifty killed or wounded. Instead of men eager to return to their old allegiance, th
Long Island City (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
rs desired the American officers to wear white and black cockades as a symbol of affection for their allies. The British fleet at New York having received a large re-enforcement, so that it had now a great superiority, Sir Henry Clinton embarked about eight thousand men for an expedition against the French in Rhode Island. Supported by militia from Massachusetts and Connecticut, the French longed for the threatened attack; but the expedition proceeded no further than Huntington Bay in Long Island, where it idled away several days, and then returned to New York. Of the incapacity of Arbuthnot, the admiral, Clinton sent home bitter complaints, which were little heeded. There were those who censured the general as equally wanting energy. The sixth summer during which the British had vainly endeavored to reduce the United States was passing away, and after the arrival of French auxiliaries the British commander-in-chief was more than ever disheartened. On the twenty-fifth of Aug
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
te close, Rodney contributed his own rare powers; and perfect harmony prevailed between the two branches of the service. On the eighteenth of September, Washington Sept. 18. crossed the North River on his way from headquarters near Tappan to Hartford, where, attended by Lafayette and Hamilton, he was to hold his first interview with General Rochambeau. He was joined on the river by Arnold, who accompanied him as far as Peekskill, and endeavored, though in vain, to obtain his consent for theted patriotism, were to be betrayed to the enemy with all their garrison. On that same evening Washington, free from suspicion, was returning to his army. He had met General Rochambeau and Admiral de Ternay at Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 22. Hartford. The interview was a genuine festival for the French, who were impatient to see the hero of liberty. His noble mien, the simplicity of his manners, his mild gravity, surpassed their expectations and gained for him their hearts. All agreed tha
Peekskill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
by which Sir Henry Clinton expected to bring the war to an immediate close, Rodney contributed his own rare powers; and perfect harmony prevailed between the two branches of the service. On the eighteenth of September, Washington Sept. 18. crossed the North River on his way from headquarters near Tappan to Hartford, where, attended by Lafayette and Hamilton, he was to hold his first interview with General Rochambeau. He was joined on the river by Arnold, who accompanied him as far as Peekskill, and endeavored, though in vain, to obtain his consent for the reception of an agent on pretended business relating to confiscated property. Had the consent been given, the interview with Andre would have taken place under a flag of truce, seemingly authorized by the American commanderin-chief. Time pressed on. Besides; Sir George Rodney had only looked in upon New York, and would soon return to the West Indies. On the evening of the eighteenth, Arnold, giving information that Washin
Cape St. Vincent (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 19
day, tired of the Keppels and the Palisers, the Chap. XVIII.} 1780. mutinous and the incompetent, put in command of the expedition that was to relieve Gibraltar and rule the seas of the West Indies. One of the king's younger sons served on board his fleet as midshipman. He took his squadron to sea on the twenty-ninth of December, 1779. On the eighth of January, 1780, Jan. 8. he captured seven vessels of war and fifteen sail of merchantmen. On the sixteenth, he encountered off 16. Cape St. Vincent, the Spanish squadron of Languara, very inferior to his own, and easily took or destroyed a great part of it. Having victualled the garrison of Gibraltar, and relieved Minorca, on the thirteenth Feb. 13. of February he set sail for the West Indies. At St. Lucie he received letters from his wife, saying: Everybody is beyond measure delighted as well as astonished at your success; from his daughter: Everybody almost adores you, and every mouth is full of your praise; come back when you
Chastellux (search for this): chapter 19
rising into notice, seemingly represented a vast outlay in money. With prodigious labor, huge trunks of trees and enormous hewn stones were piled up on steep rocks. All this had been done without cost to the state by the hands of the American soldiers, who were pervaded by a spirit as enthusiastic and as determined as that of the bravest and most cultivated of their leaders; and who received for their work not the smallest gratification, even when their stated pay remained in arrear. Chastellux, Travels. Am. ed. 46 and 50. And these works, of which every stone was a monument of humble, disinterested patriotism, were to be betrayed to the enemy with all their garrison. On that same evening Washington, free from suspicion, was returning to his army. He had met General Rochambeau and Admiral de Ternay at Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 22. Hartford. The interview was a genuine festival for the French, who were impatient to see the hero of liberty. His noble mien, the simplicity o
erience must obliterate them. Hamilton, i. 178. On the thirtieth the sentence was approved by Washington, and ordered to be carried into effect the next day. Clinton had already in a note to Chap. XVIII.} 1780 Sept. 30. Washington asked Andreas release, as one who had been protected by a flag of truce and passports granted for his return. Andre had himself, in his examination before the board of officers, repelled the excuse which Clinton made for him; and indeed to have used a flag o The others are yet on the way. Though it is too late to have the advantage of novelty, to comply with my promise I send you my account of Arnold's affair; and to justify myself to your sentiments I must inform you that I urged a compliance with Andreas request to be shot. It has been said that, as a return for clemency, Andre should have been spared. Here is an extract of an order of the subordinate of Clinton, which met his acquiescent approval, and which he forwarded to Lord George Germa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...