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the river, near Cross street to the Charlestown Wood Lots, now Middlesex Fells; the course from Salem street to the river is not positively known. In 1836, after the death of Mrs. Sarah Fulton, Medford Historical Register, Vol. 1, Page 53. who lived for nearly forty years on a lonely farm at the top of Kidders' hill, above the present Fellsway West, the street was renamed in her honor. The house where Benjamin Tufts lived, on the northeast corner of Fulton and Salem streets, is standing [1904] and within a comparatively few years was occupied by his family. The burying ground on Cross street, new in 1829, has within its crowded boundaries the dust of many of the ship building mechanics who were laid to rest within hearing of the Sound of hammers, blow on blow Knocking away the shores and spurs. Furness' corner is now officially named Winthrop square. The Furness homestead was the old home of Parson Turell, and after the Furness family left, it was owned and occupied by Jo
ty years; and at the southern terminus mingled with the salt tides of old ocean, twenty-seven miles from its entrance into the Merrimack. The charter gave the directors power to lay assessments upon the stockholders. This from time to time, as the work progressed, was done, until over a half million dollars were expended in its construction, which in the spring of 1802 was so far advanced as to allow the admission of water as far as Wilmington, once known as the Land of Nod, and on the fifth of July (Independence Day fell on Sunday that year), still further, to Woburn. The Columbian Centinel of that week gave the following— On Monday last, water was admitted to the Middlesex Canal, as far as Woburn meeting-house. More than one hundred and twenty ladies and gentlemen embarked upon its waters. Although the party was numerous, the construction of the boat was such that the accommodations were convenient. This new mode of passing through a country diversified by almost every v
August 23rd, 1766 AD (search for this): chapter 1
Royall.   Charity (wife)   Children Gould, AbrahamMar. court, 1758Servant of Benj. Peirce. Gould, ElizabethReading, April 12, 1762In house of Nathan Tufts. Gray, John, and familyDec. 28, 1750 Green, Francis (?)Aug. 31, 1797 Green, IsaacApr. 16, 1784(Wife and family.) Greenleaf, Stephen   Maria (wife)Brookline, Mayor June, 1764Dec. 3, 1764 Greenough, Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener
e 1678 Goodman: Hall Jr by money:0-15-0 Tho: willows in money0-07-6 Goodman: whitcomb & Daniell woodward0-05-0 mr Nathaniel wade0-05-0 Steven willows0-02-6 Jno. whitmore0-2-6 peter Tuft0.02-6 Goodman ffillebrowne0-05-0 John Bradfho0-02-6 —— 17-6 Strangers in Medford, (continued from Vol. 6, no. 4). Names.From. Date.Warned out.Remarks. Goldthwait, Benjamin Major. Tavern keeper.Boston, June 2, 1760Tenant of Col. Royall.   Charity (wife)   Children Gould, AbrahamMar. court, 1758Servant of Benj. Peirce. Gould, ElizabethReading, April 12, 1762In house of Nathan Tufts. Gray, John, and familyDec. 28, 1750 Green, Francis (?)Aug. 31, 1797 Green, IsaacApr. 16, 1784(Wife and family.) Greenleaf, Stephen   Maria (wife)Brookline, Mayor June, 1764Dec. 3, 1764 Greenough, Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, Dav
April 6th, 1768 AD (search for this): chapter 1
Mayor June, 1764Dec. 3, 1764 Greenough, Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   AbigailChildren And Andrew Greenough.   Elizabeth   Mary   Anna   Rebeckah   Eunice   Susannah Hall JohnPortsmouth,Apr. 14, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Single man. In employ of Col. Roya
April 21st, 1769 AD (search for this): chapter 1
adley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   AbigailChildren And Andrew Greenough.   Elizabeth   Mary   Anna   Rebeckah   Eunice   Susannah Hall JohnPortsmouth,Apr. 14, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Single man. In employ of Col. Royall. Hall, JohnBoston,Oct. 7, 1766Mar. 2, 1767 Hall, JosephJan. 30, 1791Hatter.   Joseph PattenJan. 30, 1791 Hall, MosesAnnapolis, abt.Nov. 1, 1770Jan. 30, 1791Boarder in house of Isaac Hall. Hall, WilliamBostonApr.
m Tyngsborough, and the framing done at Billerica in 1827. Eight days sufficed to remove the timbers of the lock and aqueduct with the piling that supported the latter. All the iron was saved, and the wood sawed into four foot lengths, piled in lots, and sold at auction. The old abutments of great boulders needed no repair. The wooden piling was replaced by three pieces of split granite, and the season being favorable, the work had progressed so rapidly that these neared completion in January. The total cost of the aqueduct and lock thus rebuilt was nearly $7,000. The stone was sunk into the river's bed, and so well did these men perform their work that no repairs were needed, when forty-five years later the Boston avenue bridge was built upon it and served the public for twenty-seven years. Those who may have witnessed its demolition and the construction of the graceful granite arch now spanning the river, and remember the difficulties then encountered, can readily see that wi
tow path, the fresh waters of the Concord floated the numerous boats, laden with merchandise from the north country for over forty years; and at the southern terminus mingled with the salt tides of old ocean, twenty-seven miles from its entrance into the Merrimack. The charter gave the directors power to lay assessments upon the stockholders. This from time to time, as the work progressed, was done, until over a half million dollars were expended in its construction, which in the spring of 1802 was so far advanced as to allow the admission of water as far as Wilmington, once known as the Land of Nod, and on the fifth of July (Independence Day fell on Sunday that year), still further, to Woburn. The Columbian Centinel of that week gave the following— On Monday last, water was admitted to the Middlesex Canal, as far as Woburn meeting-house. More than one hundred and twenty ladies and gentlemen embarked upon its waters. Although the party was numerous, the construction of the
June 24th, 1835 AD (search for this): chapter 1
y thirties the work on the railway progressed, the canal company, to quote Mr. Dame, assisting in the preparation for its own obsequies, not only in the delivery of the stone ties on which the rails were laid, but in the transportation to Lowell of the two locomotives (Hercules and Stevenson), purchased in England. There they were set up; and as thirty-three years before, the waters of the Concord flowed southward toward Boston, so did the first steam train take the same direction on June 24, 1835. In '38 the dividends of the canal dropped to $20 per share, but still hopeful, the managers kept the canal in order, and in '41 built, at a cost of $5,000, what remains today a monument in granite, the aqueduct at Shawsheen river. While we may wonder at such outlay under existing conditions, we can but admire the courage and faith in the enterprise the corporation had. It seems that soon after Mr. Eddy took charge that he scented the coming danger, and in an early report said: Rail
and all but one below its course. The Concord River at North Billerica crossed it at grade and being at its highest level, would supply it in either direction with water. Here, in the seventeenth century, a mill was erected and thither came the colonists with their corn to be ground. Later woolen mills were established, but the ancient terms of the grant required the maintenance of the grist mill; which requirement the canal company carried out, strengthening and making tighter the dam in 1798, and thirty years later, building the present stone dam. This still holds the flood of water, and supplies power to the great factories of the Talbot and the Faulkner companies. Over all the other streams the canal had to be carried and due regard paid to their changeful moods. A brook that in summer is insignificant, in spring may assume threatening proportions, or carry destruction in its track. Some were but slightly lower; while the Shawsheen was spanned by a wooden aqueduct one hund
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