hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Rowson 73 1 Browse Search
Jonathan Wade 31 11 Browse Search
Mathew Cradock 29 1 Browse Search
John Hall 28 4 Browse Search
Isaac Royall 25 1 Browse Search
Anna 22 0 Browse Search
Nathaniel Thomas 21 1 Browse Search
Hannah 21 1 Browse Search
Loammi Baldwin 21 1 Browse Search
Hepzibah Jones 18 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7.. Search the whole document.

Found 445 total hits in 170 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he earliest of these, conceded to have originated with James Sullivan, afterward governor of Massachusetts, was the great enterprise of its time, the Middlesex Canal. So comprehensive was the idea o, they reposed confidence in a citizen of their own. His works declare his praise. . . .Even Massachusetts, a state already proud in science, will in some future age feel an increase of pride to ackn his duties were increased by the action of the General Court, which authorized the sale in Massachusetts of tickets of the Amoskeag Canal Lottery, but exercised a thrifty oversight by directing tha payment of dividends. In the year 1808, both the president, who was then the governor of Massachusetts, and the agent, Col. Baldwin, died, and the outlook for the future of the canal was dark indbore no small part in the progress of the time, this owing to the energy and perseverance of Massachusetts and New Hampshire men, and was out-stripped in public service only by the power of steam, al
Billerica (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
, John Hancock and the corporators organized by the choice of James Sullivan for President, and Col. Loammi Baldwin of Woburn and Gen. John Brooks of Medford as vice-presidents, while several other Medford men served its interests as directors. In these later years it has been rather facetiously remarked that in the case of railroads, ground is broken with much ceremony, and that afterward the stockholders are broken without ceremony. So in the case of the canal, Col. Baldwin removed (at Billerica) the first turf, when the work of excavation actually commenced nearly sixteen months after the granting of the charter, the intervening time having been occupied in acquiring title to the land and surveying in the route. Samuel Thompson of Woburn made the preliminary survey, and the work was under the charge of Col. Baldwin, whose interest the enterprise only ceased with his life in 1808. During work in Wilmington, was discovered the tree from which the famous Baldwin apple originated.
Carmans River (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ne was needed, so little did people journey a century ago. All boats were limited by the Rules, to within a certain size, this made requisite by the locks, while the rafts of logs bound for the ship-yards of Medford, were towed in bands and passed the locks singly. Steam navigation had become an assured fact on the Hudson river in 1807, one year before Mr. Sullivan took charge of the canal, but years before the canal went into operation a steamboat was successfully operated upon the Connecticut river, and its owner and inventor was interviewed by Fulton, who, it seems, only made successful application of the inventions of John Fitch in Delaware and Samuel Morey in New Hampshire, assisted by the wealth of Livingston. Morey, to his dying day, complained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen his invention. Not despairing, however, he invented a new form of engine, for which he secured a patent. This was acquired by Sullivan, after his experience with
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763ApprStoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (Stoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   AbigailChildren And Andrew Greenough.   Elizabeth   Mary   Anna   Rebeckah   Eunice   Susannah Hall JohnPortsmouth,Apr. 14, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Single man. In employ of Col. Royall. Hall, JohnBoston,
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Canal at Amoskeag. Allusion has been made to the breaking ground with ceremony. In the construction of these locks and canals, a necessity if the capital of New Hampshire was to be reached, the canal stockholders realized the unceremonious breaking process also alluded to. Over $80,000 was paid by the Middlesex to assist in ts owner and inventor was interviewed by Fulton, who, it seems, only made successful application of the inventions of John Fitch in Delaware and Samuel Morey in New Hampshire, assisted by the wealth of Livingston. Morey, to his dying day, complained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen his inventionance. It accomplished in a way its mission, and bore no small part in the progress of the time, this owing to the energy and perseverance of Massachusetts and New Hampshire men, and was out-stripped in public service only by the power of steam, also in the hands of New England men. This question is often asked, what will, or wi
Horn Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
igh street at West Medford. This was built at Mr. Peter C. Brooks' expense, at about 1820. The engineer who designed it was George Rumford Baldwin (son of Col. B.), and it is a fitting monument to his skill, as well as a gravestone to mark where the highway of the waters is buried. The towpath in summer became a favorite walk out from Boston and from the several villages, a veritable Lovers' Lane, and some of the taverns were noted as the resort of pleasure parties, notably the one at Horn Pond in Woburn. In the winter the pleasure seekers forsook the path, for with the closing of the season by the frost king, began the sport of skating. Without exception, every man with whom the writer has conversed as to his recollections of the old waterway, refers with pleasure to the long skating trips he enjoyed. These sometimes became strenuous, as when the boys of Charlestown and Medford met near the old toll-house to the slogan of Charlestown figs put on your wigs And up to Medfor
North Billerica (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
that other water than that of the Merrimack must fill the canal in its course through the Middlesex towns to the Charles, in Charlestown. Eleven streams of varying size flowed across, and all but one below its course. The Concord River at North Billerica crossed it at grade and being at its highest level, would supply it in either direction with water. Here, in the seventeenth century, a mill was erected and thither came the colonists with their corn to be ground. Later woolen mills were eto see. Though the wooden trough of the aqueduct has long since succumbed to the forces of nature, the same silent forces have invested the granite walls (innocent of mortar in their building), with a dignity that impresses the beholder. At North Billerica one guard lock remains with its gates, and conveys the water to the wheel-pits of the Talbot mills, while a little below is the ruin of the lock into the lower river, with a fragment of the gate still in the water. At Middlesex village, whe
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   AbigailChildren And Andrew Greenough.   Elizabeth   Mary   Anna   Rebeckah   Eunice   Susannah Hall JohnPortsmouth,Apr. 14, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Single man. In employ of Col. Royall. Hall, JohnBoston,Oct. 7, 1766Mar. 2, 1767 Hall, JosephJan. 30, 1791Hatter.   Joseph PattenJan. 30, 1791 Hall, MosesAnnapolis, abt.Nov. 1, 1770Jan. 30, 1791Boarder in house of Isaac Hall. Hall, WilliamBostonApr. 3, 1762Single man. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. July 23, 1766 Hall, WilliamJan. 30, 1791Laborer. Hall, ZacheriahHaverhill, abt.Mar. 13, 1754In family of his brother, Samuel Hall. Hall, ZacheriahGranville, N. S.,June, 1770Oct. 8, 1770   (wife)   JosephChildren   William History told by names of streets. At an adjourned meeting of the Town of Medford, held May 4, 1
Brookline (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Strangers in Medford, (continued from Vol. 6, no. 4). Names.From. Date.Warned out.Remarks. Goldthwait, Benjamin Major. Tavern keeper.Boston, June 2, 1760Tenant of Col. Royall.   Charity (wife)   Children Gould, AbrahamMar. court, 1758Servant of Benj. Peirce. Gould, ElizabethReading, April 12, 1762In house of Nathan Tufts. Gray, John, and familyDec. 28, 1750 Green, Francis (?)Aug. 31, 1797 Green, IsaacApr. 16, 1784(Wife and family.) Greenleaf, Stephen   Maria (wife)Brookline, Mayor June, 1764Dec. 3, 1764 Greenough, Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
first supposed; so that other water than that of the Merrimack must fill the canal in its course through the Middlesex towns to the Charles, in Charlestown. Eleven streams of varying size flowed across, and all but one below its course. The Concord River at North Billerica crossed it at grade and being at its highest level, would supply it in either direction with water. Here, in the seventeenth century, a mill was erected and thither came the colonists with their corn to be ground. Later w finally caused its disuse. Nor was the river more favorable, as sunken logs proved a continual menace, sometimes impaling boats and causing wrecks. Mr. Sullivan believed in the use of printers' ink; for having made the successful passage to Concord and returned to Chelmsford, he immediately wrote an account of his doings to the Boston Advertiser, which published the same, and in whose editorial notice may be found a brief description of the boat and engine, which worked under all the disad
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...