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E. T. Taylor (search for this): chapter 1
cember 19, 1845, the church, erected by William B. Stone, was dedicated to the service of God. In the records of the society there is preserved a program of the dedicatory services of the Pickering Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford. This name clung to the church for many years; in fact, until the third edifice was built, in 1872, there were many who still spoke of the Methodist Church as the Pickering Church. Bishop Janes preached the dedication sermon, and prayer was offered by Rev. E. T. Taylor, the Father Taylor of the Seamen's Bethel in Boston. Upon the program mentioned above also appear two hymns, one of six stanzas and one of four, which were written especially for the occasion, although the name of the author is unknown. The church was built in accordance with the rules of church architecture existing at that timeā€”the pews were square and had doors which buttoned the occupants in. The choir was at the rear of the audience and facing the pulpit, and the singers were le
J. A. Adams (search for this): chapter 1
adies' Aid Society, which has had an uninterrupted existence, though under various names, ever since. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence L
Thomas W. Tucker (search for this): chapter 1
an uninterrupted existence, though under various names, ever since. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three
A. D. Merrill (search for this): chapter 1
ugh under various names, ever since. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service at the front, an
John W. Perkins (search for this): chapter 1
s names, ever since. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service at the front, and Mr. Ames offer
E. S. Best (search for this): chapter 1
Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service at the front, and Mr. Ames offered the farewell prayer as the compan
William A. Braman (search for this): chapter 1
6 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in AMr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service at the front, and Mr. Ames offered the farewell prayer as the company gathered around him in Medford square. He proved himself a loyal citizen and ardent patriot in the two years he remained at Medford. One of his chief characteristics was his fearless outspokenness for what he believed to be right and the uncompromising attitude he too
A. F. Herrick (search for this): chapter 1
nto the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service at the front, and Mr. Ames offered the farewell prayer as the company gathered around him in Medford square. He proved himself a loyal citizen and ardent patriot in the two years he remained at Medford. One of his chief characteristics wa
George F. Kittredge (search for this): chapter 1
ing attitude he took in the matter of slavery and State rights. During his pastorate he wrote a history of the church from its earliest beginnings in Medford, and the book containing his history, in his own handwriting, is still preserved in our archives. Among those who fought for the Union from the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford were: William H. S. Barker; Edward Gustine (killed at the battle of Malvern Hill); Daniel S. Cheney (killed at the battle before Richmond); George F. Kittredge; William B. Parker; Charles O. Alley; Henry G. Currell (died a prisoner at Andersonville); Edward F. Crockett; Henry Hathaway; Benjamin Ellis (who starved in a Southern prison, was exchanged among other prisoners, and reached Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occur
William B. Parker (search for this): chapter 1
in the matter of slavery and State rights. During his pastorate he wrote a history of the church from its earliest beginnings in Medford, and the book containing his history, in his own handwriting, is still preserved in our archives. Among those who fought for the Union from the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford were: William H. S. Barker; Edward Gustine (killed at the battle of Malvern Hill); Daniel S. Cheney (killed at the battle before Richmond); George F. Kittredge; William B. Parker; Charles O. Alley; Henry G. Currell (died a prisoner at Andersonville); Edward F. Crockett; Henry Hathaway; Benjamin Ellis (who starved in a Southern prison, was exchanged among other prisoners, and reached Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occurred which spread thr
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