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J. N. Maffitt (search for this): chapter 1
tt's preaching, a Methodist class was formed which met every Sabbath afternoon, and weekly prayer-meetings were held. These meetings continued until 1823, when the first revival ever known in Medford occurred, and a Methodist Society of forty members was organized. A building adjoining Cradock bridge called Mead's Hall was leased and fitted up, and a Sunday-school of about twenty members was formed. For seven years Brother Brackett continued to hold services in Medford, assisted by Revs. J. N. Maffitt and C. K. True. In 1828 a second revival occurred, in which many of the Sunday-school scholars were converted and joined the class. The same year the society was incorporated as The First Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford, with Josiah Brackett, Isaac McElroy, Jonathan Gross, George Williams, William James, James D. Yates, Alvah Smith and Louis Janson as trustees, and a house of worship, 25 × 40 feet, was built on Cross street. This building now stands on Salem street, two doors
Peter C. Brooks (search for this): chapter 1
nce doors were near its corners, and a broad platform with steps descending toward Salem street extended entirely across its front. These were, in 1854, removed, as also the slightly elevated alcove within, between the entries, that contained the singing seats. More seating capacity was thus gained, and an enlargement was made in front for a vestibule, with a gallery above for the choir and the excellent organ then procured. Externally the building then presented the appearance shown in Brooks'History of Medford, and a few other changes were made within, notably the removal of the pew doors. In the year 1847 a society known as the Ladies' Parsonage Furnishing and Stewards' Relief Society was formed. This was the beginning of the organization now known as the Ladies' Aid Society, which has had an uninterrupted existence, though under various names, ever since. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their wee
Nathan W. Wait (search for this): chapter 1
oners, and reached Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occurred which spread through the town, embracing all the evangelical churches. During this pastorate, also, the church lost by death three of its most valued members—Joseph L. Goldthwait, Albert Butters and Ira T. Barker. In 1869 Rev. N. T. Whitaker followed Mr. Wait. That year the society purchased a house on the corner of Salem and Park streets for a parsonage, but retained it only two years when the new church enterprise demanded all available funds. In 1869 a new board of trustees was incorporated according to the General Statutes of the Commonwealth. On July 1, 1871, land for a new church was bought on Salem street near Cross street, and the work of building was entered upon at once. The building comm
Willard Smith (search for this): chapter 1
existence, though under various names, ever since. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service a
Charles Noble (search for this): chapter 1
. At first the Ladies' Society took the form of a sewing circle. The ladies took in sewing, working on it at their weekly meetings, and the money received for the work done there went into the treasury. Any member bringing her own sewing to the meeting was fined six cents. From 1846 to 1854 the following able and consecrated pastors served the Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford: Revs. J. A. Adams, James Shepard, Thomas W. Tucker, Willard Smith, A. D. Merrill, John W. Perkins and Charles Noble. Revs. E. S. Best and William A. Braman followed. During Mr. Braman's ministry the vestry was repaired and improved, and a gracious revival of religion was experienced. Rev. A. F. Herrick followed, and was succeeded by Rev. Jarvis A. Ames. Mr. Ames was appointed to Medford in April, 1861, and on the day he arrived news came of the attack on Fort Sumter. The next Wednesday the Lawrence Light Guard left Medford for three months service at the front, and Mr. Ames offered the farewell pra
Noah Hathaway (search for this): chapter 1
rch edifice in Medford. He was successful, and a lot of land at the corner of Salem and Oakland streets was bought for $600. The church, in 1845, had forty-two members. In August, 1845, Messrs. Job Clapp, Ira Barker, William B. Stone and Noah Hathaway were chosen building committee. On December 19, 1845, the church, erected by William B. Stone, was dedicated to the service of God. In the records of the society there is preserved a program of the dedicatory services of the Pickering Methath-school was also discontinued for a time. In 1843 it was reorganized, with Ira T. Barker as superintendent, and from that time until the present has had a continuous existence. The superintendents have been as follows:— Ira T. Barker, Noah Hathaway, Thomas Emerson, Joseph L. Goldthwait, Charles F. Newcomb, Thomas C. Newcomb, S. B. Harrington, Charles N. Jones, Bailey T. Mills, Augustus L. Ordway, S. N. Mayo, W. T. Such are the bare facts of the history of the First Methodist Episco
August, 1845 AD (search for this): chapter 1
o small and moved to the Town Hall. At the New England Conference in 1844, Medford was made a regular station, and Rev. George Pickering was appointed pastor. The next year Rev. George Frost was sent to Medford, and Brother Pickering was appointed a special missionary agent to raise funds for the erection of a church edifice in Medford. He was successful, and a lot of land at the corner of Salem and Oakland streets was bought for $600. The church, in 1845, had forty-two members. In August, 1845, Messrs. Job Clapp, Ira Barker, William B. Stone and Noah Hathaway were chosen building committee. On December 19, 1845, the church, erected by William B. Stone, was dedicated to the service of God. In the records of the society there is preserved a program of the dedicatory services of the Pickering Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford. This name clung to the church for many years; in fact, until the third edifice was built, in 1872, there were many who still spoke of the Methodist
Charles Ellis (search for this): chapter 1
e First Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford were: William H. S. Barker; Edward Gustine (killed at the battle of Malvern Hill); Daniel S. Cheney (killed at the battle before Richmond); George F. Kittredge; William B. Parker; Charles O. Alley; Henry G. Currell (died a prisoner at Andersonville); Edward F. Crockett; Henry Hathaway; Benjamin Ellis (who starved in a Southern prison, was exchanged among other prisoners, and reached Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occurred which spread through the town, embracing all the evangelical churches. During this pastorate, also, the church lost by death three of its most valued members—Joseph L. Goldthwait, Albert Butters and Ira T. Barker. In 1869 Rev. N. T. Whitaker followed Mr. Wait. That year the society purchased a ho
October, 1878 AD (search for this): chapter 1
contained one of the Medford town clocks and a 1,800-pound bell of the key of F. If this edifice lacked the present-day requirements of church housekeeping, it was at least up to date at its erection, and was built with the idea of accommodating a growing church in a growing community. The winter of 1874 was blessed with a glorious revival, in which many were converted and brought into the church. Mr. Wagner was followed by Rev. T. Berton Smith, and he by Rev. T. Corwin Watkins. In October, 1878, the semi-centennial of the church was held, it being fifty years from the date of incorporation. The celebration lasted one week, and many former pastors were present. When Mr. Watkins left us he took with him as his wife one of our members, Miss E. D. Hadley. Mr. Watkins was followed by Rev. Gilbert C. Osgood. Mr. Osgood employed no evangelist during his three years pastorate, but union meetings with the Baptist and Congregational churches were held in January of each year, continuin
Gilbert Haven (search for this): chapter 1
erprise demanded all available funds. In 1869 a new board of trustees was incorporated according to the General Statutes of the Commonwealth. On July 1, 1871, land for a new church was bought on Salem street near Cross street, and the work of building was entered upon at once. The building committee were William C. Child, Thomas C. Newcomb and Obed K. Doane, who did faithful service until the beautiful church was completed at a cost of $50,000. It was dedicated April 30, 1873, by Bishop Gilbert Haven, assisted by Revs. Ira G. Bidwell, D. D. (who preached the sermon), R. R. Meredith, and the pastor, Rev. Francis J. Wagner. Inasmuch as this church building was for many years a landmark in Medford, and now nothing remains of it, even its ashes having been removed, it may be well to give a short description of its distinguishing characteristics. It was of open timber construction, its interior finish was of chestnut, and the organ pipes and frescoing in blue and gold. The auditor
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