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William C. Child (search for this): chapter 1
Whitaker followed Mr. Wait. That year the society purchased a house on the corner of Salem and Park streets for a parsonage, but retained it only two years when the new church enterprise demanded all available funds. In 1869 a new board of trustees was incorporated according to the General Statutes of the Commonwealth. On July 1, 1871, land for a new church was bought on Salem street near Cross street, and the work of building was entered upon at once. The building committee were William C. Child, Thomas C. Newcomb and Obed K. Doane, who did faithful service until the beautiful church was completed at a cost of $50,000. It was dedicated April 30, 1873, by Bishop Gilbert Haven, assisted by Revs. Ira G. Bidwell, D. D. (who preached the sermon), R. R. Meredith, and the pastor, Rev. Francis J. Wagner. Inasmuch as this church building was for many years a landmark in Medford, and now nothing remains of it, even its ashes having been removed, it may be well to give a short descript
N. T. Whitaker (search for this): chapter 1
Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occurred which spread through the town, embracing all the evangelical churches. During this pastorate, also, the church lost by death three of its most valued members—Joseph L. Goldthwait, Albert Butters and Ira T. Barker. In 1869 Rev. N. T. Whitaker followed Mr. Wait. That year the society purchased a house on the corner of Salem and Park streets for a parsonage, but retained it only two years when the new church enterprise demanded all available funds. In 1869 a new board of trustees was incorporated according to the General Statutes of the Commonwealth. On July 1, 1871, land for a new church was bought on Salem street near Cross street, and the work of building was entered upon at once. The building committee were William
December 23rd, 1906 AD (search for this): chapter 1
mmittee was appointed to secure a temporary place of worship. On Monday evening, August 2 1, a special Quarterly Conference was held, and it was voted to rebuild at once. A committee on location was appointed, and it was finally decided to build in a different locality. Accordingly, on October 10, 1905, land on Otis street, near Central avenue, was bought for the site of a new church, and a house and land on Central avenue were purchased for a parsonage. From September 1, 1905, to December 23, 1906, the church services were held in the Washington School Hall, kindly placed at our disposal by Mayor Dwyer. On July 7, 1906, the corner-stone of the present edifice was laid. The building committee consisted of Rev. E. C. Bridgham, A. L. Ordway, William F. Wiltshire, L. Frank Cole and Edgar A. Thomas. They labored faithfully; the architect, Lewis A. Dow of Melrose, did all that scientific skill and tireless effort could do, and on March Io, 1907, the present edifice was dedicated
William Walters (search for this): chapter 1
help of all her friends; Mrs. Mary E. Child, tireless worker and always full of zeal for missions, and many, many more. Truly the Medford Methodists may raise their rock Ebenezer, and say with Samuel and Joshua of old,Hitherto hath the Lord helped us, and The Lord our God will we serve and his voice will we obey. Church Officials. Pastor.—Rev. Edgar Cary Bridgham. Board of Trustees.—Augustus L. Ordway, Levi W. Adams, William F. Wiltshire, William H. Magoun, Edgar A. Thomas, William Walters. Board of Stewards.—Charles N. Jones, Mrs. Abby D. Saxe, L. Frank Cole, Mrs. Ida M. Smith, Joseph A. Paine. Bliss P. Boultenhouse, William Hindle, George G. Colby, Arthur W. Merrill, William G. Chanter. Superintendent Sunday-school.—Arthur W. Merrill; Secretary, Katharine D. Saxe. President Ladies' Aid Society.—Mrs. Ida M. Smith; Secretary, Ella L. Alden. President Woman's Foreign Missionary Society.— Mrs. Walter S. Rust; Secretary, Mrs. J. A. Paine. President Epwort
George Frost (search for this): chapter 1
fall of 1843, when Rev. Joseph Whitman of Malden and Rev. George Landon, pastor at North Russell street, Boston, held regular services in the chapel. During the winter a revival occurred, when ninety people were converted. The Sabbath-school was reorganized the same winter. The society soon found the chapel too small and moved to the Town Hall. At the New England Conference in 1844, Medford was made a regular station, and Rev. George Pickering was appointed pastor. The next year Rev. George Frost was sent to Medford, and Brother Pickering was appointed a special missionary agent to raise funds for the erection of a church edifice in Medford. He was successful, and a lot of land at the corner of Salem and Oakland streets was bought for $600. The church, in 1845, had forty-two members. In August, 1845, Messrs. Job Clapp, Ira Barker, William B. Stone and Noah Hathaway were chosen building committee. On December 19, 1845, the church, erected by William B. Stone, was dedicate
Charles N. Jones (search for this): chapter 1
edged. Since 1905, the church has lost by death several of her oldest members, among them being Mrs. L. W. Adams, Mrs. C. N. Jones, Mrs. Mary E. Child and Miss Frances Taylor. The present membership is two hundred and twenty-one. The other orgarker, Noah Hathaway, Thomas Emerson, Joseph L. Goldthwait, Charles F. Newcomb, Thomas C. Newcomb, S. B. Harrington, Charles N. Jones, Bailey T. Mills, Augustus L. Ordway, S. N. Mayo, W. T. Such are the bare facts of the history of the First Metach by our Quarterly Conference, and going out from us to a useful and honorable career as a preacher of the gospel; Mrs. C. N. Jones, gifted, sympathetic, her well-balanced judgment and wise counsel were the support and help of all her friends; Mrs.way, Levi W. Adams, William F. Wiltshire, William H. Magoun, Edgar A. Thomas, William Walters. Board of Stewards.—Charles N. Jones, Mrs. Abby D. Saxe, L. Frank Cole, Mrs. Ida M. Smith, Joseph A. Paine. Bliss P. Boultenhouse, William Hindle, George
Mary Hall (search for this): chapter 1
treet, Boston, held regular services in the chapel. During the winter a revival occurred, when ninety people were converted. The Sabbath-school was reorganized the same winter. The society soon found the chapel too small and moved to the Town Hall. At the New England Conference in 1844, Medford was made a regular station, and Rev. George Pickering was appointed pastor. The next year Rev. George Frost was sent to Medford, and Brother Pickering was appointed a special missionary agent to raOtis street, near Central avenue, was bought for the site of a new church, and a house and land on Central avenue were purchased for a parsonage. From September 1, 1905, to December 23, 1906, the church services were held in the Washington School Hall, kindly placed at our disposal by Mayor Dwyer. On July 7, 1906, the corner-stone of the present edifice was laid. The building committee consisted of Rev. E. C. Bridgham, A. L. Ordway, William F. Wiltshire, L. Frank Cole and Edgar A. Thomas.
Edgar A. Thomas (search for this): chapter 1
corner-stone of the present edifice was laid. The building committee consisted of Rev. E. C. Bridgham, A. L. Ordway, William F. Wiltshire, L. Frank Cole and Edgar A. Thomas. They labored faithfully; the architect, Lewis A. Dow of Melrose, did all that scientific skill and tireless effort could do, and on March Io, 1907, the pres later built a substantial home in our town. For over twenty years Father and Mother Newcomb were pillars of strength, and were worthily succeeded by their sons, Thomas, Charles and John. Thomas C. Newcomb, sunny tempered, charitable in all his judgments; Franklin Rand, optimistic, loyal, and deeply pious; William H. Miller, clas Church Officials. Pastor.—Rev. Edgar Cary Bridgham. Board of Trustees.—Augustus L. Ordway, Levi W. Adams, William F. Wiltshire, William H. Magoun, Edgar A. Thomas, William Walters. Board of Stewards.—Charles N. Jones, Mrs. Abby D. Saxe, L. Frank Cole, Mrs. Ida M. Smith, Joseph A. Paine. Bliss P. Boultenhouse, William<
Rodney Hathaway (search for this): chapter 1
in Medford were: William H. S. Barker; Edward Gustine (killed at the battle of Malvern Hill); Daniel S. Cheney (killed at the battle before Richmond); George F. Kittredge; William B. Parker; Charles O. Alley; Henry G. Currell (died a prisoner at Andersonville); Edward F. Crockett; Henry Hathaway; Benjamin Ellis (who starved in a Southern prison, was exchanged among other prisoners, and reached Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occurred which spread through the town, embracing all the evangelical churches. During this pastorate, also, the church lost by death three of its most valued members—Joseph L. Goldthwait, Albert Butters and Ira T. Barker. In 1869 Rev. N. T. Whitaker followed Mr. Wait. That year the society purchased a house on the corner of Salem and Park
Benjamin Ellis (search for this): chapter 1
gs in Medford, and the book containing his history, in his own handwriting, is still preserved in our archives. Among those who fought for the Union from the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford were: William H. S. Barker; Edward Gustine (killed at the battle of Malvern Hill); Daniel S. Cheney (killed at the battle before Richmond); George F. Kittredge; William B. Parker; Charles O. Alley; Henry G. Currell (died a prisoner at Andersonville); Edward F. Crockett; Henry Hathaway; Benjamin Ellis (who starved in a Southern prison, was exchanged among other prisoners, and reached Medford only to die); Antipas Newton, Jr.; Austin F. Clark; Charles Ellis; George A. Newcomb; Rodney Hathaway and Nelson Hathaway. Mr. Ames was followed by Revs. Henry M. Loud, David Sherman, D. D., and Daniel Wait. During Mr. Wait's ministry a revival occurred which spread through the town, embracing all the evangelical churches. During this pastorate, also, the church lost by death three of its mos
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