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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Greenville, North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
bmit the same as amended to the voters of the State for their adoption or rejection. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, offered the following, which, on motion of Mr. Chambliss, was laid on the table: Resolved, That a committee of twenty-one be appointed by the Chair, to be styled the Committee on the State Constitution, and that they report to the Convention what amendments, if any, are necessary at present to be made to the present State Constitution. Petition. Mr. Chambliss, of Greensville, presented a petition from Robert R. Collier, Esq., of Petersburg, making suggestions with regard to the present condition of the country, which was read. Mr. Nelson of Clark, moved that it be laid upon the table, but withdrew it temporarily at the request of Mr. Chambliss, who had previously asked for the reference of the petition to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Chambliss advocated the right of petition, and said the suggestions of any citizen were entitled to the co
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
ss there were a demand for it. King Spindle and King Hog, he conceived, were as potent as King Cotton. The Cotton States cannot live without manufactures, nor can they live without something to eat. With regard to secession, he took the view that it was a revolutionary remedy, and denied that Virginia had reserved to herself the right to secede.--He urged Virginia to act, without waiting for the result of the Peace Conference. With regard to the fifth resolution, he said it was probable New England would not agree to it, and he was not anxious that she should. He would welcome Georgia and Alabama back, but preferred that South Carolina should stay out until she had learned to treat us with respect. Mr. Moore proceeded to define his position at some length, expressing his desire that Virginia should be prepared for any emergency. He would go with her wherever she went, unless she went where she would be disgraced. His interest was with Virginia, now and forever. In closing, he b
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
and in this connection he alluded to the probable re-opening of the African slave trade. It was their policy to support the Government by direct taxation; and to show what would have to be thus supported, mentioned a standing army of 20,000 men, which it was believed would be necessary, making the cost of Government $50,000,000 per year, of which, according to his calculation, Virginia's portion would he $6,000,000 or $7,000,000; because indications were against the secession of Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Delaware, and Maryland. Virginia would be saddled with a burden, in addition to the completion of works in which her vital interest was involved, greater than she could bear. With reference to the threats of abolishing the inter-State slave trade, he said he did not choose to be intimidated by such threats as that.--He also scorned the imputation that Virginia would skulk under the protection of the North, and disdained a connection with a people who could make it. Th
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
Virginia State Convention.Tenth day. Monday, Feb. 25, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Minnegerode, of St. Paul's Church. Committee. The President announced the following select committee, under Mr. Tredway's resolution, adopted on Saturday, to make inquiries as to whether any movement of arms or men has been made by the General Government, indicating a purpose to coerce Virginia; Messrs. Tredway, Pendleton, Bouldin, Wilson and Mallory. Amendments to the Constitution. Mr. Haymond offered the following resolution, which, on his motion, was laid on the table and ordered to be printed: Resolved, That the Constitution of this State should be amended, and that this Convention will amend the Constitution wherein it is necessary and proper that it should be amended, and will submit the same as amended to the voters of the State for their adoption or rejection. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, offered the following
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
er week; each Doorkeeper, $28 per week; each Page, $14 per week; Superintendent of the Hall, (Mr. John D. Smith,) $5 per day, including compensation of servants, &c. The report was adopted. The National difficulties. Mr. Moobe, of Rockbridge, offered the following resolutions: 1st. Resolved, That the conduct of the so-called free States, in resisting the execution of the Fugitive Slave Law — in refusing to give up criminals fleeing from justice — and in seeking to deprive tha publication to show that England, so far from wanting to abolish slavery, was exerting a secret power for the dissolution of the Union. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, desired to enter his protest against the views submitted by the gentleman from Rockbridge, which had given him, as a member of the Virginia Convention, inexpressible pain. He (Mr. Moore) seemed to misapprehend the object of this Convention. He had aimed his big gun entirely against the gallant States of the South, and had given no
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
d learned to treat us with respect. Mr. Moore proceeded to define his position at some length, expressing his desire that Virginia should be prepared for any emergency. He would go with her wherever she went, unless she went where she would be disgraced. His interest was with Virginia, now and forever. In closing, he brought forward a publication to show that England, so far from wanting to abolish slavery, was exerting a secret power for the dissolution of the Union. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, desired to enter his protest against the views submitted by the gentleman from Rockbridge, which had given him, as a member of the Virginia Convention, inexpressible pain. He (Mr. Moore) seemed to misapprehend the object of this Convention. He had aimed his big gun entirely against the gallant States of the South, and had given not a word of rebuke to those who had brought the sad disasters upon the country — the people of the Northern States, the destroyers of the fairest temple of free
Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
, moved that the resolutions under consideration be laid on the table until morning, as Mr. Goode did not desire to proceed with his remarks this afternoon. The motion was agreed to. Mr. Montague called the attention of the President to the fact, that an individual had been taken into custody in compliance with an order from the Chair, and asked that the matter be disposed of. The President said he gave no such order, and went on to explain what had occurred. Mr. Wysor, of Pulaski, said that the gentleman who made the disturbance had refused to leave, and was, in consequence, taken into custody by the Sergeant- at-Arms. After some further conversational debate, Mr. R. Y. Conrad moved that the prisoner be discharged from custody, which was carried in the affirmative. Mr. Burdett, of Taylor, offered a resolution, that in view of the disturbance that had just occurred, a committee be appointed to take into consideration the expediency of adjourning to Staunton
Correctional police. --Messrs. Williams and Kimbrough, Overseers of the Chain-Gang, were summoned before the Mayor yesterday to receive some instructions as to the mode of managing that penal institution. He said that formerly he had nothing to do but assign suitable parties to positions of labor and to discharge them therefrom for good and sufficient cause. It was incumbent on the Superintendent of Streets to say where they should work, but in no case was it to be beyond the limits of the corporation, and was to be on public works owned by the city. The Superintendent of Streets, who was present, said that the ordinance was silent as to who should direct where the gang must work, but that he had assumed occasionally to direct in conjunction with the City Engineer.--The Mayor said it was his duty to appoint persons to take charge of the gang, and that the duty of providing balls and chains for the members devolved on the Superintendent of Streets. The latter said the articles
Kimbrough (search for this): article 1
Correctional police. --Messrs. Williams and Kimbrough, Overseers of the Chain-Gang, were summoned before the Mayor yesterday to receive some instructions as to the mode of managing that penal institution. He said that formerly he had nothing to do but assign suitable parties to positions of labor and to discharge them therefrom for good and sufficient cause. It was incumbent on the Superintendent of Streets to say where they should work, but in no case was it to be beyond the limits of the corporation, and was to be on public works owned by the city. The Superintendent of Streets, who was present, said that the ordinance was silent as to who should direct where the gang must work, but that he had assumed occasionally to direct in conjunction with the City Engineer.--The Mayor said it was his duty to appoint persons to take charge of the gang, and that the duty of providing balls and chains for the members devolved on the Superintendent of Streets. The latter said the article
William Booth (search for this): article 1
of Streets, who was present, said that the ordinance was silent as to who should direct where the gang must work, but that he had assumed occasionally to direct in conjunction with the City Engineer.--The Mayor said it was his duty to appoint persons to take charge of the gang, and that the duty of providing balls and chains for the members devolved on the Superintendent of Streets. The latter said the articles could be had in quantities to suit. The Mayor alluded to the recent escape of Wm. Booth, a member of the gang, and the circumstances connected therewith as reported, the accuracy of which the overseers denied in some particulars, and inquired what they must do when parties refused to work. In reply, he said there must be no more escapes, there need be none, and when such an event did occur it must be reported instantly to him or some other magistrate. He said in reference to the government of refractory subjects, power was given him by a law passed March 27th, 1860, to orde
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