hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 38 0 Browse Search
Bomba Lincoln 26 0 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Arizona (Arizona, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Gen Beauregard 16 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
August 28th 13 13 Browse Search
A. S. Johnson 11 1 Browse Search
Charles Humphrey Tyler 11 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,255 total hits in 565 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
the Confederate privateers. As the object of sending the flag of truce at this time was deemed to be rather requisite, Gen. Wool decided to detain the flag until late to-morrow. It is high time that an end should be put to this constant intrusion arshal of the entire department of Virginia. He yesterday arrested the crew of the schooner Chirgarora, from New York. Gen.Wool has sent them to the Rip Raps. Seven spies have recently been discovered here and placed in confinement. The much-ats remain at Old Point and Newport News. Cols. Max Weber and Hawkins take part in the expedition. Order from Gen. Wool. Since his arrival at Fortress Monroe, Gen. Wool has issued an order, from which we copy: "Many of the inhabiGen. Wool has issued an order, from which we copy: "Many of the inhabitants of Elizabeth City county complain of depredations having been committed on their property by soldiers stationed in their neighborhoods. All such persons or others residing in the pale of this command engaged in farming, cultivating their fiel
August 27th (search for this): article 1
leet. She carries two 32 pounders, one 24 pound boat howitzer and one rifled cannon. Federal Accounts of Affairs South of the Potomac. Lewensville, Va., Aug. 27. --The enemy has occupied Bailey's Cross Roads in considerable force and are entrenching. Farmers are not allowed to come through to Washington now, and thherman is in command of the enemy at Bailey's Cross-Roads. Secessionists hereabouts profess to expect lively times soon in this neighborhood. Chain Bridge, Aug. 27.--Five of our men, while out scouting about three miles above here yesterday, were in a corn-field, and to their dismay discovered that about thirty "secede" cava did not stop to investigate, however, but scampered off in one direction, while the cavalry, just as much frightened, dashed off in the other. Fort Albany, Aug. 27.--We hear that our most advanced entrenchment in the direction of Balley's Cross-Roads was taken possession of by "secesh" night before last. The work was intend
k, having in his custody as a prisoner of State, William M. Fisk, said to belong to the State of Louisiana, who is charged with uttering seditious and treasonable sentiments while enjoying the society of the fashionable hotels at Newport, R. I. He was dispatched to the retirement of Fort Lafayette, in accordance with orders from the Secretary of State at Washington. A British vessel boarded. Captain De Wolfe, of the British brig Ann Lovett, which arrived at Yarmouth, N. S., on the 19th inst., reports that on the 9th inst. in lat. 29.45, long. 67, his vessel was boarded by the privateer Jeff. Davis, and released after a brief examination-of her papers. The officer in charge of the boarding party gave his name as B. H. Stuart. Stoxles made a Brigadier. The President has directed that a commission of Brigadier General should be issued to Daniel E. Sickies. Release ordered. The Baltimore Sun learns that orders have gone from Washington to Philadelphia for the r
n John G. Walker, Third Cavalry; First Lieutenant M. M. Kimmel, Fifth Cavalry. The following officers have been ordered to duty as the staff of General Robert Anderson: Captain O. D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain W. S. Hancock, Assistant Quartermaster; Captain H. L. Symonds, Commissary of Subsistence; Captain P. E. Prime, Corps of Engineers; First Lieutenant N. Michser, Topographical Engineers; Surgeon J. M. Coyler, Medical Staff. This morning the steamer Ben Deford, Capt. Hallet, arrived at the Navy-Yard from Boston, with 240 seamen. The steamer immediately discharged her load, and expected to leave for Baltimore this evening. She reports all quiet along the river and at Old Point. Two or three of the large U. S. steamers left Fortress Monroe, going in a southerly direction as the Ben Deford passed. The Live Yankee is about ready for service, and will join the flotilla this evening, when she will again become flag-ship of the Potomac fleet. She carries tw
New York Express, after noting the arrest of Mrs. Green how and Mrs. Phillips, says: Mrs. Greenhow is a sister of Mrs. Cutts, the mother of Mrs. Douglas. Mrs. Phillips is a daughter of Mr. J. C. Levy, now of Savannah, but a native, and for the greater portion of his life a reays of nullification, Mr. Levy was a firm Union man, as also was Mr. Phillips, then a young lawyer at the Charleston bar. At the close of the war of nullification Mr. Phillips removed to Mobile, where he soon acquired a large practice. On his election to Congress, in 1853, he removeuccessful result of his mission was chronicled at the time. Mr. Phillips is a most estimable man and enjoys the respect of his legal totelomatists of France or Russia. It is a little singular that Mr. Phillips occupies the house in I street which, for the last two or three night. The female members of the family of Mayor Barrett and Mr. Phillips are all under strict surveillance, military guards being station
Henry D. Gilpin (search for this): article 1
s further: "A number of letters directed to prominent people in the South, and a map of the seat of war in Virginia, were found. He is a grandson of Mrs. Henry D. Gilpin, of this city. Upon the breaking out of the war he received a Lieutenant's commission in the Confederate army, and he was with Beauregard at Manassas.--This fact caused much uneasiness to his grandmother, and she determined to procure his discharge, if possible. A lady friend of Mrs. Gilpin attempted to accomplish this object, and, in a carriage, she succeeded in working her way through both lines, and into the rebel camp. Here she had an interview with Beauregard, who received he him from the service. He then joined his mother, at Warrenton, Va., and three weeks ago he succeeded in reaching Philadelphia, where he has made his home with Mrs. Gilpin." Boston harbor defence. The Boston Post states that the efforts of Mayor Wightman to have the forts in Boston harbor properly armed, have been succes
Robert Anderson (search for this): article 1
d, has been appointed an Assistant Adjutant General of volunteers in the army of the United States. He is a young gentleman of great military experience for his age and of great wealth, we hear. The resignations of the following officers have been accepted by the President, viz: Captain Frank C. Armstrong, Second Cavalry; Captain John G. Walker, Third Cavalry; First Lieutenant M. M. Kimmel, Fifth Cavalry. The following officers have been ordered to duty as the staff of General Robert Anderson: Captain O. D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain W. S. Hancock, Assistant Quartermaster; Captain H. L. Symonds, Commissary of Subsistence; Captain P. E. Prime, Corps of Engineers; First Lieutenant N. Michser, Topographical Engineers; Surgeon J. M. Coyler, Medical Staff. This morning the steamer Ben Deford, Capt. Hallet, arrived at the Navy-Yard from Boston, with 240 seamen. The steamer immediately discharged her load, and expected to leave for Baltimore this evening.
or the greater portion of his life a resident, of Charleston; a gentleman well known at the North, and esteemed wherever known for his literary acquirements, the courtesy of his manners, and his open-handed hospitality. In the days of nullification, Mr. Levy was a firm Union man, as also was Mr. Phillips, then a young lawyer at the Charleston bar. At the close of the war of nullification Mr. Phillips removed to Mobile, where he soon acquired a large practice. On his election to Congress, in 1853, he removed to this city, where he has since resided, and where his fine legal abilities have secured him a lucrative practice in the Supreme Court. He has always been regarded here as a Union man, and was sent fast winter by Mr. Buchanan on a quast diplomatic mission to the South to ascertain if it were possible to get up a reactionary movement in Georgia and Alabama against the Secessionists. The unsuccessful result of his mission was chronicled at the time. Mr. Phillips is a most es
d lately proceeded to Richmond, where he remained three weeks, systematized the business of the armory at that place, (a time table of which was found in his truck,) and returned to Philadelphia a few weeks ago to buy material and get a force of mechanics. The Charleston blockade — how the privateers Elude the squadron. We take the following from a letter published ed in the Philadelphia Ledger, from an officer of the U. S. ship Vandalla, off Charleston harbor, and written on the 10th inst.: Affairs on this blockade are but little changed; a laborious and monotonous existence at best, with but little prospect of improvement. The latter portion of our time has been devoted to guarding Bull's Bay, a small port of entrance, about 22 miles north of Charleston harbor. When under sail we have ventured as close to the shore as the ship's draft would admit. At such times we observed extensive military encampments and sand batteries erected, but could see few soldiers. We a
ife of the ex-Mayor of Washington, was in the Mayor's office, at the City Hall, yesterday evening about the time the Councils met, and stated to some acquaintances that the search at her husband's house for papers had been got through with, and she was now expecting them to search the office, and she wished to reclaim from the officers any of her husband's private papers which might be found. Captain J. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General, has been relieved from duty on the staff of General McDowell, and ordered to duty on that of Major General Hunter, in Illinois.--2d Lieutenant T. W. Stockton, 2d Cavalry, has also been ordered to duty on General Hunter's staff. Sir John Murray, of England, has been appointed an Assistant Adjutant General of volunteers in the army of the United States. He is a young gentleman of great military experience for his age and of great wealth, we hear. The resignations of the following officers have been accepted by the President, viz: Ca
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...