hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 38 0 Browse Search
Bomba Lincoln 26 0 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Arizona (Arizona, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Gen Beauregard 16 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
August 28th 13 13 Browse Search
A. S. Johnson 11 1 Browse Search
Charles Humphrey Tyler 11 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,255 total hits in 565 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
ovided for through Gen. Sumner, who has assumed the responsibility. The entire force will be provided with the well made and substantial clothing that the regular troops are entitled to. There have been a large number of rumors afloat in reference to the movements of Gen. A. S. Johnson, late in command of the Pacific Division, but the San Francisco Morning Chronicle pronounces them all untrue. It seems that Johnson started from Los Angeles with a company ostensibly for the destination of Texas. After the party left Los Angeles, a disagreement occurred and they divided. Gen. Johnson returned to this city and took passage for the East on the steamer, and a portion of the original party, under command of a resident of Los Angeles and a well-known citizen of this place, proceeded into Mexico. The reports that Gen. Johnson had arrived in Virginia, and that he had accepted the command of the late Gen. Garnett, are incorrect. Our informant is of the most reliable character.
e blockade and success in rifling our merchantmen. We cannot, nor could double the number of vessels, prevent this. Our gun-boats are really of more service in such business than the first-class frigates. --We rejoice they are fitting out so rapidly and daily arriving at their stations. The Females under arrest at Washington. The Washington correspondent of the New York Express, after noting the arrest of Mrs. Green how and Mrs. Phillips, says: Mrs. Greenhow is a sister of Mrs. Cutts, the mother of Mrs. Douglas. Mrs. Phillips is a daughter of Mr. J. C. Levy, now of Savannah, but a native, and for the greater portion of his life a resident, of Charleston; a gentleman well known at the North, and esteemed wherever known for his literary acquirements, the courtesy of his manners, and his open-handed hospitality. In the days of nullification, Mr. Levy was a firm Union man, as also was Mr. Phillips, then a young lawyer at the Charleston bar. At the close of the war of null
A. S. Johnson (search for this): article 1
py the following concerning war matters, and if it is all as incorrect as the statement about Gen. Johnson's movements, there is no reliance to be placed on it: The fifteen hundred men from Cali to. There have been a large number of rumors afloat in reference to the movements of Gen. A. S. Johnson, late in command of the Pacific Division, but the San Francisco Morning Chronicle pronounces them all untrue. It seems that Johnson started from Los Angeles with a company ostensibly for the destination of Texas. After the party left Los Angeles, a disagreement occurred and they divided. Gen. Johnson returned to this city and took passage for the East on the steamer, and a portion of the original party, under command of a resident of Los Angeles and a well-known citizen of this place, proceeded into Mexico. The reports that Gen. Johnson had arrived in Virginia, and that he had accepted the command of the late Gen. Garnett, are incorrect. Our informant is of the most relia
thin the limits of this command, whether by land or water, is called to the 56th and 57th Articles of War." Washington Items. That very corrupt paper, the Washington Star, under date of Tuesday evening, furnishes the subjoined: Mrs. Barrett, wife of the ex-Mayor of Washington, was in the Mayor's office, at the City Hall, yesterday evening about the time the Councils met, and stated to some acquaintances that the search at her husband's house for papers had been got through with, and secure them from the impertinent observation of the curious. The three ladies already arrested are confined here, and it is understood that they will have the society of three more before to-night. The female members of the family of Mayor Barrett and Mr. Phillips are all under strict surveillance, military guards being stationed in both houses. The arrest of Young Johnston. It was stated yesterday that Wm. L. Johnston, said to be a nephew of Gen. Johnston, of the Confederate
on from Old Point has sailed under command of General Butter. It consisted of the frigates Minnesota and Wabash, the ship-of-war Pawnee, gun boats. Monticello and Harriet Lane, steamers Adelaide and George Peabody, propellers Fanny and Adriatic, with a large number of schooners, barges, &c. The Quaker City will follow in a few hours. The vessels carded over one hundred guns and about 4,000 min. Several powerful gun-boats remain at Old Point and Newport News. Cols. Max Weber and Hawkins take part in the expedition. Order from Gen. Wool. Since his arrival at Fortress Monroe, Gen. Wool has issued an order, from which we copy: "Many of the inhabitants of Elizabeth City county complain of depredations having been committed on their property by soldiers stationed in their neighborhoods. All such persons or others residing in the pale of this command engaged in farming, cultivating their fields and gardens, tending their flocks of herds, or bringing provisions or
h inst. in lat. 29.45, long. 67, his vessel was boarded by the privateer Jeff. Davis, and released after a brief examination-of her papers. The officer in charge of the boarding party gave his name as B. H. Stuart. Stoxles made a Brigadier. The President has directed that a commission of Brigadier General should be issued to Daniel E. Sickies. Release ordered. The Baltimore Sun learns that orders have gone from Washington to Philadelphia for the release of Messrs, Carson, Kelley and Pegram, arrested at Harrisburg a few days since by order or the Government. It is said to have been satisfactorily proved to the Government that the visit of these gentleman to the South was purely on private business, and that the funds found in their possession are the proceeds of collections of money due them. Rumored arrest of W. W. Corcoran, the Banker. It is currently reported that W. W. Corcoran has been arrested for treason by the Provost Marshal; he has been supp
Richard Wallach (search for this): article 1
me as Arbert Bruen. He was taken by a policeman before Marshal Murray, who was asked for the proof against him; and Capt. Quinn replied he would have to proceed in quest of it. The prisoner was then remanded to the police headquarters. Mayor Wallach and his brother "Dug." The new Mayor of Washington, Richard Wallach, was serenaded last Monday night, and in return he made a speech in the course of which he declared himself for the Lincoln Government. He was followed by his brother, tRichard Wallach, was serenaded last Monday night, and in return he made a speech in the course of which he declared himself for the Lincoln Government. He was followed by his brother, the editor of the Star, W. D. Wallach, who declared himself an exile from Virginia, his home and his family and property, but in favor forever of the Federal Government. Mrs. Greenhow. A Washington dispatch to the New York Herald says: Since the arrest of the females who have made themselves conspicuous by their efforts to obtain and transmit valuable information to the rebels, in addition to the charges upon which their arrest was based, a number of facts have been discovered sho
John G. Walker (search for this): article 1
l Hunter, in Illinois.--2d Lieutenant T. W. Stockton, 2d Cavalry, has also been ordered to duty on General Hunter's staff. Sir John Murray, of England, has been appointed an Assistant Adjutant General of volunteers in the army of the United States. He is a young gentleman of great military experience for his age and of great wealth, we hear. The resignations of the following officers have been accepted by the President, viz: Captain Frank C. Armstrong, Second Cavalry; Captain John G. Walker, Third Cavalry; First Lieutenant M. M. Kimmel, Fifth Cavalry. The following officers have been ordered to duty as the staff of General Robert Anderson: Captain O. D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain W. S. Hancock, Assistant Quartermaster; Captain H. L. Symonds, Commissary of Subsistence; Captain P. E. Prime, Corps of Engineers; First Lieutenant N. Michser, Topographical Engineers; Surgeon J. M. Coyler, Medical Staff. This morning the steamer Ben Deford, Capt. Halle
J. B. Fry (search for this): article 1
ington Star, under date of Tuesday evening, furnishes the subjoined: Mrs. Barrett, wife of the ex-Mayor of Washington, was in the Mayor's office, at the City Hall, yesterday evening about the time the Councils met, and stated to some acquaintances that the search at her husband's house for papers had been got through with, and she was now expecting them to search the office, and she wished to reclaim from the officers any of her husband's private papers which might be found. Captain J. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General, has been relieved from duty on the staff of General McDowell, and ordered to duty on that of Major General Hunter, in Illinois.--2d Lieutenant T. W. Stockton, 2d Cavalry, has also been ordered to duty on General Hunter's staff. Sir John Murray, of England, has been appointed an Assistant Adjutant General of volunteers in the army of the United States. He is a young gentleman of great military experience for his age and of great wealth, we hear. T
Martin Green (search for this): article 1
reckless that this is the most probable theory of their managing to run the blockade and success in rifling our merchantmen. We cannot, nor could double the number of vessels, prevent this. Our gun-boats are really of more service in such business than the first-class frigates. --We rejoice they are fitting out so rapidly and daily arriving at their stations. The Females under arrest at Washington. The Washington correspondent of the New York Express, after noting the arrest of Mrs. Green how and Mrs. Phillips, says: Mrs. Greenhow is a sister of Mrs. Cutts, the mother of Mrs. Douglas. Mrs. Phillips is a daughter of Mr. J. C. Levy, now of Savannah, but a native, and for the greater portion of his life a resident, of Charleston; a gentleman well known at the North, and esteemed wherever known for his literary acquirements, the courtesy of his manners, and his open-handed hospitality. In the days of nullification, Mr. Levy was a firm Union man, as also was Mr. Phillips,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...