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Marshfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
thout breaking down on the first day's march, and even to that arm of the service it would be very fatiguing. We have positive information from General Price's army up to the 3d instant. It evacuated Springfield on New Year's day, and encamped on Wilson creek, near the old battle ground, also taking a position at Pond Spring, twelve miles west of Springfield, where Gen. Lyon's army waited for several days on its arrival from Roonville. A picket and foraging party held possession of Marshfield on the 5th, but a force of our troops had gone from Major Wright's command, and will probably succeed in driving them out. A party less than 200 strong were at Bolivar, on the road from Springfield to Warsaw, engaged in procuring flour and other supplies for the rebel army. The Secessionists of Springfield and vicinity have nearly all gone South, taking with them their negroes and all their moveable property. A portion of Fort-Smith is reported destroyed by fire about a month since.
Humphrey Marshall (search for this): article 1
strongly entrenched camp and fled. I sent my cavalry to the mouth of Jennies Creek, where they attacked and drove the rebel cavalry, which had been left as a vanguard, a distance of five miles, killing three and wounding a considerable number. Marshall's whole army is now flying in utter confusion. He had abandoned and burned a large quantity of stores. We have taken fifteen prisoners. Our loss was two killed and one wounded. I start in pursuit to-morrow morning. J. A. Garfield, Coday noon with 1,100 men, and drove in the enemy's pickets two miles below Prestonsburg The men slept on their arms. At four o'clock yesterday morning we moved towards the main body of the enemy at the forks of Middle creek, under the command of Marshall. Skirmishing with his outposts began at eight o'clock, and at one o'clock P. M. we engaged his force of 2,500, with three cannon posted on the hill. We fought them until dark, having been reinforced by about 700 men from Paintsville, and drove
Edward N. Kellogg (search for this): article 1
atrick McGinnley and John Hirst, company C; Michael Dowting, company F; Adolphus Keller, company C; Jas. H. Hart, company B; Ferd. Kelley, company B; Michael McGrain, company B; Luther L. Mills, company A; Jas. A. Coburn, company K; Ed. Sweeney, company G; Henry Hege, company G; Hugh F. Dunnigan, company H; Chas Redecker, company G; John Tyler, company D; Samuel Van Duger, company I; Wm. Fielding, company F; Wm. H. Brees, company l; Henry Van Orman, company K; Augustus Gauss, company C; Ed. N. Kellogg, company B, and Edw. L. Marsh, company E. Total, twenty-four. Another letter from Dempsey, the Yankee prisoner. From the New York Herald, of the 15th instant, we copy the following letter, from J. W. Dempsey, who, it will be remembered, wrote a letter from the Charleston prison some time since, in which he took occasion to utter many falsehoods with regard to the treatment of Federal prisoners in the South: Columbia, S. C., Jan. 4, 1862. My Dear Wife --Before this
ous impediment to the march of infantry or the movement of transportation trains. Cavalry alone could get through it without breaking down on the first day's march, and even to that arm of the service it would be very fatiguing. We have positive information from General Price's army up to the 3d instant. It evacuated Springfield on New Year's day, and encamped on Wilson creek, near the old battle ground, also taking a position at Pond Spring, twelve miles west of Springfield, where Gen. Lyon's army waited for several days on its arrival from Roonville. A picket and foraging party held possession of Marshfield on the 5th, but a force of our troops had gone from Major Wright's command, and will probably succeed in driving them out. A party less than 200 strong were at Bolivar, on the road from Springfield to Warsaw, engaged in procuring flour and other supplies for the rebel army. The Secessionists of Springfield and vicinity have nearly all gone South, taking with them th
McClellan (search for this): article 1
e. My love to mother, sister and the little boys. Your affectionate husband. J. W. Dempsey. Recovery of Gen. M'Clellan. The Washington telegraphic correspondent of the New York Herald, under date of the 14th inst., says: General McClellan has quite recovered from his recent illness, and is now able to devote himself to business. Those whose impatience had induced them to murmur at the to them apparently unreasonable delay of any great military movement, will soon have occasion to acknowledge their error.--General McClellan confides his plans to none, except as they are to be executed. His purpose is to effectually crush out the rebellion, and restore the public peace and the integrity of the Union. Within the last few days those who have been admitted even to a partial confidence, and among them some who have looked gloomily upon the future, are elated at the prospect presented, and express satisfaction that all will soon be convinced of the wisdom of the cours
J. W. Dempsey (search for this): article 1
y l; Henry Van Orman, company K; Augustus Gauss, company C; Ed. N. Kellogg, company B, and Edw. L. Marsh, company E. Total, twenty-four. Another letter from Dempsey, the Yankee prisoner. From the New York Herald, of the 15th instant, we copy the following letter, from J. W. Dempsey, who, it will be remembered, wrote a letJ. W. Dempsey, who, it will be remembered, wrote a letter from the Charleston prison some time since, in which he took occasion to utter many falsehoods with regard to the treatment of Federal prisoners in the South: Columbia, S. C., Jan. 4, 1862. My Dear Wife --Before this reaches you the papers, no doubt, will have informed you of our removal from Charleston to this citnever was better. Be of good cheer; all will be right. Kiss little Mary for me. My love to mother, sister and the little boys. Your affectionate husband. J. W. Dempsey. Recovery of Gen. M'Clellan. The Washington telegraphic correspondent of the New York Herald, under date of the 14th inst., says: General McCl
Patrick McGinnley (search for this): article 1
is speaks well for the character of our soldiers. Sixty-five members of this regiment are yet held as prisoners of war in various portions of the South, including Major J. D. Potter and Lieutenant Thomas Hamblin. Surgeon Griswold and Captain Hugh McQuade, who were also prisoners, have both died, the latter of wounds received at Bull Run. The following are the names of the returned prisoners; Serg't Chas W. Fairfield, company D; Frederick Hoefer company C; W, H. Millett, company G; Patrick McGinnley and John Hirst, company C; Michael Dowting, company F; Adolphus Keller, company C; Jas. H. Hart, company B; Ferd. Kelley, company B; Michael McGrain, company B; Luther L. Mills, company A; Jas. A. Coburn, company K; Ed. Sweeney, company G; Henry Hege, company G; Hugh F. Dunnigan, company H; Chas Redecker, company G; John Tyler, company D; Samuel Van Duger, company I; Wm. Fielding, company F; Wm. H. Brees, company l; Henry Van Orman, company K; Augustus Gauss, company C; Ed. N. Kellogg
ed and drove the rebel cavalry, which had been left as a vanguard, a distance of five miles, killing three and wounding a considerable number. Marshall's whole army is now flying in utter confusion. He had abandoned and burned a large quantity of stores. We have taken fifteen prisoners. Our loss was two killed and one wounded. I start in pursuit to-morrow morning. J. A. Garfield, Commanding Brigade, Brigade, Prestonsburg, Ky,. Jan. 11, 1862. Capt. J. B. Fry, Assistant Adj't-Gen: I left Paintsville on Thursday noon with 1,100 men, and drove in the enemy's pickets two miles below Prestonsburg The men slept on their arms. At four o'clock yesterday morning we moved towards the main body of the enemy at the forks of Middle creek, under the command of Marshall. Skirmishing with his outposts began at eight o'clock, and at one o'clock P. M. we engaged his force of 2,500, with three cannon posted on the hill. We fought them until dark, having been reinforced by about
Fifth Ohio rapidly into the mountain, to which the rebels had fled. There a sharp engagement ensued; whole voifeys of musketry were heard, and it was soon discovered that the rebels were firing from behind a breastwork on the top of the mountain. As soon as Col. Dunning discovered this he ordered his men to fix bayonets and charge.--While this was being done the rebels left in haste for their camp, at the foot of the mountain and back of the Gap. While the above action was going on Col. Mason charged up the mountain to the right with the Fourth Ohio, and drove the rebels from the rocks on that side. Some sharp firing occurred in that direction. In the meantime, but when the firing had nearly ceased on the mountains, the Eighth Ohio led the way down the Gap, followed by the First Virginia, Seventh Ohio and the Fourth Indiana. Colonel Dunning having passed on and taken the two pieces of artillery, with their caissons and horses also a wagon and horses, with the Ohio regime
Jacob Smith (search for this): article 1
A picket and foraging party held possession of Marshfield on the 5th, but a force of our troops had gone from Major Wright's command, and will probably succeed in driving them out. A party less than 200 strong were at Bolivar, on the road from Springfield to Warsaw, engaged in procuring flour and other supplies for the rebel army. The Secessionists of Springfield and vicinity have nearly all gone South, taking with them their negroes and all their moveable property. A portion of Fort-Smith is reported destroyed by fire about a month since. A few refuges have lately come in who state that the rebels are greatly enrage at the outrages committed by Jennison and his men, and will retaliate severely at the earliest opportunity. I have what I consider reliable information from spies just arrived, and who saw and talked with Price five days since, that the rebels intend to return to some point on the sage, above Warsaw, as soon as their forces are properly organized. The h
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