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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 12, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Thurlow Weed (search for this): article 4
rter, Scotch ale, and Dutch herring, for the use of the army. He next spoke of the character of the steamer Cataline, whereby a vessel worth $15,000 was chartered to the Government for $10,000 per month, and fifty thousand dollars to be paid in the event of her loss by war risks, intimating, also, that she was loaded for private speculation, to be run at the expense of the Government. He showed that her purchase was secured by four separate notes, signed respectively by Jno. E. Develin, Thurlow Weed, G. C. Davidson, and C. B. Matteson. He next alluded to a horse contract at Huntingdon, Pa., when, on the purchase of 1,000 horses, the Treasury was the capital.--He then spoke of Mr. Morgan's agency, showing that although he had paid less than the owners asked, he had also paid more than the vessels cost; that in some cases vessels were charged to the Government at a higher price than the owners received; that the arrangement of Mr. Secretary Welles, allowing Mr. Morgan to take two and
C. B. Matteson (search for this): article 4
, for the use of the army. He next spoke of the character of the steamer Cataline, whereby a vessel worth $15,000 was chartered to the Government for $10,000 per month, and fifty thousand dollars to be paid in the event of her loss by war risks, intimating, also, that she was loaded for private speculation, to be run at the expense of the Government. He showed that her purchase was secured by four separate notes, signed respectively by Jno. E. Develin, Thurlow Weed, G. C. Davidson, and C. B. Matteson. He next alluded to a horse contract at Huntingdon, Pa., when, on the purchase of 1,000 horses, the Treasury was the capital.--He then spoke of Mr. Morgan's agency, showing that although he had paid less than the owners asked, he had also paid more than the vessels cost; that in some cases vessels were charged to the Government at a higher price than the owners received; that the arrangement of Mr. Secretary Welles, allowing Mr. Morgan to take two and a half per cent, from the seller, w
he East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad--the cars having run through for the first time on Sunday. In a few days the immense quantities of flour, which have been awaiting shipment for months, will probably find its way to our city. Parson Brownlow. Parson Brownlow's case may be briefly stated. He desired to go North, but before he was ready he was taken sick. He was arrested to protect him from violence. He still continues sick at his own house, being too unwell to be removed. When way to our city. Parson Brownlow. Parson Brownlow's case may be briefly stated. He desired to go North, but before he was ready he was taken sick. He was arrested to protect him from violence. He still continues sick at his own house, being too unwell to be removed. When he recovers he will probably be suffered to depart "to the other side of Jordan," together with his family. He can do no harm there to our cause, while his presence among us might do injury.--Memphis Avalanche.
llan. The Abolition organs, says the New York Herald, of the 7th instant, have been taking a remarkably deep interest in the reconstruction of the English War Department lately. They have been circulating a report that the Duke of Cambridge is about to resign, and that it has been determined to abolish the post of Commander-in-Chief and vest it in the Secretary of War. Simultaneously with this appeared a statement in the Washington correspondence of one of them that the President and Mr. Stanton had determined upon assuming the complete direction of the affairs of the army, and confining Gen. McClellan to the command of the Army of the Potomac. In yesterday's Tribune we again find a paragraph which was followed up by an attack on the General-in-Chief in the Post. The Tribune says: General McClellan's New Rank.--The better opinion is that General McClellan will not resign in consequence of the change which the censor allowed us partially to indicate last night, but will str
James B. Grant (search for this): article 4
smay of the opposition. The military operations in Tennessee. Nothing has been received at headquarters from General Grant or Commodore Foots further than the dispatch received at the Navy Department and forwarded to the Herald early this a We congratulate our readers upon another important Union victory in the West. Our splendid Western soldiers, under Generals Grant and McClernand, who, in their first encounter with the rebels at Belmont, exhibited the fighting qualities of Napoleonother." The New York Herald, of the 8th instant, says: By our latest reports from Paducah, it appears that General Grant and Gen. Smith were pursuing the flying rebels, to the amount of four or five thousand, on each side of the river, anhy with the cause of rebellion. Several gun- boats left Paducah yesterday for the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, and Gen. Grant was to attack. Fort Donelson to-day. It is thus evident that the blow struck at Fort Henry is to be vigorously follow
George D. Morgan (search for this): article 4
the purchase of 1,000 horses, the Treasury was the capital.--He then spoke of Mr. Morgan's agency, showing that although he had paid less than the owners asked, he han the owners received; that the arrangement of Mr. Secretary Welles, allowing Mr. Morgan to take two and a half per cent, from the seller, was placing him in antagonihat the percentage was in fact taken from the Government, and the $90,000 which Morgan had received in five months really belonged to the Treasury; that although the y this system of purchase, and they had notified the Secretary. In this case Mr. Morgan claimed and took $2,500 commissions, when he did nothing towards negotiating the sale. Mr. Morgan claimed to have been asked for this vessel $130,000, and the owners testify they allowed the department to fix the price. That the sale of 5,00ecretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 4
ength so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and France can agree to interfere there will be an end of Jeff. Davis and his spurious Southern Confederacy. In this view we are powerfully supported by the patriotic action of Congress, in its seasonable legislation to relieve the financial embarrassments of the Government and the country. Speech of Mr. Van Wyck in Congress — important Developments. The following remarks were submitted by Mr. Van Wyck in the Federal House of Representatives, on the 7th inst.: Mr. Van Wyck, (Rep) of New York, moved the consideration of the report; of the Co
The rumored condition of the interior counties of East Tennessee is not improved by the lapse of time. The people apprehend an immediate advance of the Northmen, and traitors to the South evince their joy in every village and neighborhood. Johnson and Maynard have advised their friends that they would soon return to their homes, and that the "grasp of secessionism should he relaxed." The scouts of the enemy have penetrated, so dame rumor tells us, to Jamestown, within fifty miles of Knoxvported 35,000 strong at Beech Grove, the scene of the late defeat. The Unionists are making demonstration in many of the northern counties, and even here there were exhibitions of joy on the arrival of the news from Beech Grove. Armed bands of Johnson's and Maynard's followers are prowling about in all directions through the mountains. In remote counties many have been shot at night in their own houses, who adhered to the fortunes of the South.--Men stand as sentinels by turn at every house,
on the soil of Missouri; or that the Burnside expedition will be confined to reconnaissances of the inland waters of North Carolina; or that the powerful fleet of Dupont and the co-operating land forces of Sherman will be idle; or that our land and naval forces in Florida and on Ship Island, within convenient distance of New Orleaipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthef Rhode Island, urging the propriety of permanently locating the Naval Academy at Newport was presented. A joint resolution, giving the thanks of Congress to Captain Dupont and his officers and seamen for the victory at Port Royal, was adopted. The Judiciary Committee reported that Mr. Starke, the Senator from Oregon, whose loya
Simon Stevens (search for this): article 4
0 commissions, when he did nothing towards negotiating the sale. Mr. Morgan claimed to have been asked for this vessel $130,000, and the owners testify they allowed the department to fix the price. That the sale of 5,000 Hall's carbines, by Simon Stevens to Gen. Fremont, was an inconceivable bargain, whereby, without any risk or investment of capital, Mr. Stevens was in one day to realize $50,000. That in the Department of the West, through the agency of Quartermaster McKinstry and his inspecMr. Stevens was in one day to realize $50,000. That in the Department of the West, through the agency of Quartermaster McKinstry and his inspectors, Government was plundered of many thousands. That although Generals and Cabinet Ministers were buried beneath the weight of increasing responsibility, this rock less horde were undermining the very ground on which they trod. He commented on the subject of army transportation, that by an order of the late Secretary of War, railroads were allowed two cents per mile for soldiers and local rates for freight; and so great were the profits, that the Western roads paid a bonus of from $1,500 to
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