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at Mr. Starke, the Senator from Oregon, whose loyalty has been questioned was entitled to take the constitutional oath. A minority report was, however, presented, and the papers were ordered to be printed. In the House of Representatives, the Treasury Note bill was by consent amended so as to allow the Treasury Department, at its option, to pay the interest on Government bonds in coin or paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, the late Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guards in Missouri and Maryland, was agreed to. Several private bills were passed. Both Houses adjourned till Monday.
William B. Smith (search for this): article 4
of this, we would strongly recommend an amalgamation of the Tribune and the Independent --that the Tribunes swallow up the Independent, or the Independent the Tribune --it makes no matter which. By this arrangement both will probably disappear some fine morning before the end of the war, and never be heard of again. "Treachery of the rebels to one another." The New York Herald, of the 8th instant, says: By our latest reports from Paducah, it appears that General Grant and Gen. Smith were pursuing the flying rebels, to the amount of four or five thousand, on each side of the river, and it was reported that many of the garrison of Fort Henry abandoned the fight, leaving the artillery corps alone to defend it, not having much sympathy with the cause of rebellion. Several gun- boats left Paducah yesterday for the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, and Gen. Grant was to attack. Fort Donelson to-day. It is thus evident that the blow struck at Fort Henry is to be vigorously
Jonathan E. Develin (search for this): article 4
oons, London porter, Scotch ale, and Dutch herring, for the use of the army. He next spoke of the character of the steamer Cataline, whereby a vessel worth $15,000 was chartered to the Government for $10,000 per month, and fifty thousand dollars to be paid in the event of her loss by war risks, intimating, also, that she was loaded for private speculation, to be run at the expense of the Government. He showed that her purchase was secured by four separate notes, signed respectively by Jno. E. Develin, Thurlow Weed, G. C. Davidson, and C. B. Matteson. He next alluded to a horse contract at Huntingdon, Pa., when, on the purchase of 1,000 horses, the Treasury was the capital.--He then spoke of Mr. Morgan's agency, showing that although he had paid less than the owners asked, he had also paid more than the vessels cost; that in some cases vessels were charged to the Government at a higher price than the owners received; that the arrangement of Mr. Secretary Welles, allowing Mr. Morgan
erful fleet of Dupont and the co-operating land forces of Sherman will be idle; or that our land and naval forces in Florida and on Ship Island, within convenient distance of New Orleans and Mobile. Will remain resting upon their oars; or that Gen. Wool will be limited to the daily routine of Fortress Monroe; or that our great Army of the Potomac will be continued much longer in the monotonous service of an army of observation. On the contrary, we expect that this whole immense circle of fleeamps of Louisiana. Our land and naval forces are at length so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and Fr
any might be disposed to favor, under the mistaken notion that it was based on the results of English military experience. Sad Effects of the War upon Newspapers. The New York Herald, of the 8th inst., says editorially: We have it upon the highest authority, no less than that of the Tribune itself, that that journal has been losing money ever since the beginning of the war. We now learn that the owners, some thirty of them, all with long, lank hair, and shaggy beards, except Greeley, have held a meeting to take into consideration the propriety of suspending publication till the war is over, as the rapid rate at which they are losing their capital just now will soon clear them out, whereas by suspending they could save something out of the wreck to start afresh with when peace is restored. Now, instead of this, we would strongly recommend an amalgamation of the Tribune and the Independent --that the Tribunes swallow up the Independent, or the Independent the Tribune --
nts will be officially made public. Another Senatorial inquiry probable. The expulsion of Mr. Bright is likely to prove only the beginning of the war against Senators suspected of disloyalty. Attention is already being directed toward Mr. Powell, of Kentucky. It is said that shortly a resolution will be introduced into the Senate directing the Superintendent of the Document room to inform that body what public documents Mr. Powell has ordered to be sent to members of the Southern ConfMr. Powell has ordered to be sent to members of the Southern Confederacy since the formation of the Provisional Government. Threatening aspect of things in East Tennessee. Our Tennessee exchanges give us gloomy prospects for the future in that part of the Confederacy. Several of the leading journals intimate very plainly that there is "really a threatening state of affairs in East Tennessee," growing out of the "idolatrous love" of many of these people "for the old Union." A correspondent of the Avalanche writes thus of this feeling: The rumo
ravagant fiction in point of self-inflicted sufferings, when contrasted with that which details the sacrifices of the Russians. Tennessee Bridges. The Memphis Avalanche says: We learn from a gentleman, who has just passed over the line, that all the bridges are up on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad--the cars having run through for the first time on Sunday. In a few days the immense quantities of flour, which have been awaiting shipment for months, will probably find its way to our city. Parson Brownlow. Parson Brownlow's case may be briefly stated. He desired to go North, but before he was ready he was taken sick. He was arrested to protect him from violence. He still continues sick at his own house, being too unwell to be removed. When he recovers he will probably be suffered to depart "to the other side of Jordan," together with his family. He can do no harm there to our cause, while his presence among us might do injury.--Memphis Avalanche.
-There is the highest authority for stating that there is no truth in the report that the recent rebel flag of truce brought to headquarters here a communication threatening the lives of the hostages, Col. Corcoran and others, in the event of the execution of the Missouri bridge burners. There is in the communication no allusion whatever to that subject, and it is not believed that the contents will be officially made public. Another Senatorial inquiry probable. The expulsion of Mr. Bright is likely to prove only the beginning of the war against Senators suspected of disloyalty. Attention is already being directed toward Mr. Powell, of Kentucky. It is said that shortly a resolution will be introduced into the Senate directing the Superintendent of the Document room to inform that body what public documents Mr. Powell has ordered to be sent to members of the Southern Confederacy since the formation of the Provisional Government. Threatening aspect of things in East Ten
Ministers (search for this): article 4
o have been asked for this vessel $130,000, and the owners testify they allowed the department to fix the price. That the sale of 5,000 Hall's carbines, by Simon Stevens to Gen. Fremont, was an inconceivable bargain, whereby, without any risk or investment of capital, Mr. Stevens was in one day to realize $50,000. That in the Department of the West, through the agency of Quartermaster McKinstry and his inspectors, Government was plundered of many thousands. That although Generals and Cabinet Ministers were buried beneath the weight of increasing responsibility, this rock less horde were undermining the very ground on which they trod. He commented on the subject of army transportation, that by an order of the late Secretary of War, railroads were allowed two cents per mile for soldiers and local rates for freight; and so great were the profits, that the Western roads paid a bonus of from $1,500 to $2,500 for the privilege of transporting a single regiment. He considered the pirates
McKinstry (search for this): article 4
rgan claimed and took $2,500 commissions, when he did nothing towards negotiating the sale. Mr. Morgan claimed to have been asked for this vessel $130,000, and the owners testify they allowed the department to fix the price. That the sale of 5,000 Hall's carbines, by Simon Stevens to Gen. Fremont, was an inconceivable bargain, whereby, without any risk or investment of capital, Mr. Stevens was in one day to realize $50,000. That in the Department of the West, through the agency of Quartermaster McKinstry and his inspectors, Government was plundered of many thousands. That although Generals and Cabinet Ministers were buried beneath the weight of increasing responsibility, this rock less horde were undermining the very ground on which they trod. He commented on the subject of army transportation, that by an order of the late Secretary of War, railroads were allowed two cents per mile for soldiers and local rates for freight; and so great were the profits, that the Western roads paid
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