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this beleaguered rebellion, the echoes of which will be heard from the Mississippi overland to the Potomac, and from the Potomac to the Carolinas, and thence along the seaboard and Gulf coast to the swamps of Louisiana. Our land and naval forces are at length so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and France can agree to interfere there will be an end of Jeff. Davis and his spurious Southern Confederacy. In this view we are powerfully supported by the patriotic action of Congress, in its seasonable legislation to relieve the financial embarrassments of the Government and the country. Spee
red condition of the interior counties of East Tennessee is not improved by the lapse of time. The people apprehend an immediate advance of the Northmen, and traitors to the South evince their joy in every village and neighborhood. Johnson and Maynard have advised their friends that they would soon return to their homes, and that the "grasp of secessionism should he relaxed." The scouts of the enemy have penetrated, so dame rumor tells us, to Jamestown, within fifty miles of Knoxville. Many strong at Beech Grove, the scene of the late defeat. The Unionists are making demonstration in many of the northern counties, and even here there were exhibitions of joy on the arrival of the news from Beech Grove. Armed bands of Johnson's and Maynard's followers are prowling about in all directions through the mountains. In remote counties many have been shot at night in their own houses, who adhered to the fortunes of the South.--Men stand as sentinels by turn at every house, and the farme
M'Clellan (search for this): article 4
War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guards in Missouri and Maryland, was agreed to. Several private bills were passed. Both Houses adjourned till Monday. The Abolition War on General M'Clellan. The Abolition organs, says the New York Herald, of the 7th instant, have been taking a remarkably deep interest in the reconstruction of the English War Department lately. They have been circulating a report that the Duke of Cambridge is about to resign, and that it has been determined to abolish the post of Commander-in-Chief and vest it in the Secretary of War. Simultaneously with this appeared a statement in the Washington correspondence of one of them that the President and M
its seasonable legislation to relieve the financial embarrassments of the Government and the country. Speech of Mr. Van Wyck in Congress — important Developments. The following remarks were submitted by Mr. Van Wyck in the Federal House ofMr. Van Wyck in the Federal House of Representatives, on the 7th inst.: Mr. Van Wyck, (Rep) of New York, moved the consideration of the report; of the Committee on Government Contracts, and addressed the House, referring to the tragedy at Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861, wheMr. Van Wyck, (Rep) of New York, moved the consideration of the report; of the Committee on Government Contracts, and addressed the House, referring to the tragedy at Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861, when the pulse of the nation for a moment stood still; advantage was taken of its trembling necessities by speculators. He spoke of the cattle contract made in this city, whereby fifty thousand dollars was realized on two thousand head; of the agency oive months really belonged to the Treasury; that although the Secretary claimed that none of the sellers censured him, Mr. Van Wyck referred to the sale of the Mercedita, where the owners claimed to have been wronged by this system of purchase, and t
re of Fort Henry, has already struck a much more important blow on the Cumberland river. Gen. Fremont and the Radicals. It is currently rumored that Gen. Fremont has been completely whitewashGen. Fremont has been completely whitewashed by the radical majority in the Select Committee on the Conduct of the War. The clique of shriekers are loud and bold in their prognostications that he will be assigned to an important position in tand of the Army of the Potomac. All this is bosh and pure nonsense. It is not impossible that Fremont may be assigned to some command, but it will not be of a character to gratify the partisan viewhose examination lasted several hours, was in every respect of the most damaging character to Gen. Fremont, in both a military and civil point of view. It presented his conduct in a light so clearly the department to fix the price. That the sale of 5,000 Hall's carbines, by Simon Stevens to Gen. Fremont, was an inconceivable bargain, whereby, without any risk or investment of capital, Mr. Steven
sed great rejoicing. It is regarded, however, as only the first faint muttering of the terrific storm about to burst upon the rebels from all points of the compass. The passage of the currency bill and the glorious news of the success of the Union arms are sources of congratulation in Administration circles, only equalled by the consternation and dismay of the opposition. The military operations in Tennessee. Nothing has been received at headquarters from General Grant or Commodore Foots further than the dispatch received at the Navy Department and forwarded to the Herald early this afternoon. It is believed that the expedition, having effected the capture of Fort Henry, has already struck a much more important blow on the Cumberland river. Gen. Fremont and the Radicals. It is currently rumored that Gen. Fremont has been completely whitewashed by the radical majority in the Select Committee on the Conduct of the War. The clique of shriekers are loud and bold i
gency, showing that although he had paid less than the owners asked, he had also paid more than the vessels cost; that in some cases vessels were charged to the Government at a higher price than the owners received; that the arrangement of Mr. Secretary Welles, allowing Mr. Morgan to take two and a half per cent, from the seller, was placing him in antagonism to the Government which employed him; that the percentage was in fact taken from the Government, and the $90,000 which Morgan had received as to allow the Treasury Department, at its option, to pay the interest on Government bonds in coin or paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, the late Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing f
Tennessee Bridges (search for this): article 4
mies advance; we shall burn villages and towns; the crops and cattle must be utterly destroyed, and invading armies must be starved into helplessness. The Russians acted well and patriotically when their empire was assailed by Napoleon's irresistible hosts; but the South, when penetrated by invading armies, will leave a history which shall be as most extravagant fiction in point of self-inflicted sufferings, when contrasted with that which details the sacrifices of the Russians. Tennessee Bridges. The Memphis Avalanche says: We learn from a gentleman, who has just passed over the line, that all the bridges are up on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad--the cars having run through for the first time on Sunday. In a few days the immense quantities of flour, which have been awaiting shipment for months, will probably find its way to our city. Parson Brownlow. Parson Brownlow's case may be briefly stated. He desired to go North, but before he was ready he
of the Cabinet are in favor of the establishment of civil government under the protection of the military power, as at Port Roal and in other places in the South where the Union flag has lately been unfurled again. The recent flag of truce from the rebels. Washington, Feb. 7. --There is the highest authority for stating that there is no truth in the report that the recent rebel flag of truce brought to headquarters here a communication threatening the lives of the hostages, Col. Corcoran and others, in the event of the execution of the Missouri bridge burners. There is in the communication no allusion whatever to that subject, and it is not believed that the contents will be officially made public. Another Senatorial inquiry probable. The expulsion of Mr. Bright is likely to prove only the beginning of the war against Senators suspected of disloyalty. Attention is already being directed toward Mr. Powell, of Kentucky. It is said that shortly a resolution will
upporting Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland river, at Dover, some ten miles across the hills at this point from the Tennessee; and, next, that those railroads will be occupied which connect the rebels on the Mississippi with the rebels in Virginia; and that then, as all that section of Kentucky lying between the Cumberland and the Mississippi is attached to the department of General Halleck, there will be, under his direction, a combined movement of all his disposable forces from Fort Henry, Mayfield, Paducah, Smithland, and Cairo, including Commodore Porter's gun-boats, upon Columbus, in front, flank and rear, and that it will not be long before we shall have the pleasure of announcing a crushing defeat of the rebels in that quarter. Meantime, in accordance with the instructions of Gen. McClellan, the army of Gen. Buell is steadily encircling the great rebel camp at Bowling Green. This is a strong defensive position, the village being surrounded by a circle of abrupt and commandi
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