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E. P. McCrea (search for this): article 8
the pilot-house was carried away, together with two iron plates; in fact, my upper works are completely riddled. One shot struck the steam valve, bending it, which slowed us down — fortunately not stopping the engine. As you ordered me to return after delivering the dispatches, I passed the batteries again at night, but was not fired at. Ten shots struck the vessel in all, to say nothing of the bullets in the wood work from the sharpshooters. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't. E. P. McCrea, Lieutenant Commanding. Commander J. M. Gillis, commanding naval forces, James river. The great battle before Richmond,[from the N. Y. World, June 30.] A battle, which resulted, as we are informed by a trustworthy authority, in the grandest Union triumph of the war, and which would probably insure the capture of Richmond, took place at the close of last week, but the particulars we are not permitted to publish, Secretary Stanton having taken upon himself to prohibit the send
John Pope (search for this): article 8
All true friends of the country will rejoice at the recent act of the President in placing Gen. Pope, a true soldier of proved military skill and efficiency, over General Fremont, the mere politignation of the office seeker, whose place is not the field of battle, at the head of an army. Gen. Pope is a man of military knowledge and genius. He has shown his energy and talent in the Western General, and this morning his headquarters was thronged with officers come to say "good-bye." Gen. Pope is daily expected to arrive, though it is not yet known at what point his headquarters will beClellan was getting his army into trim. This difficult duty he performed admirably. Maj. Gen. John Pope. Major-Gen. John Pope is a man about forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. HeMajor-Gen. John Pope is a man about forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after living in Kentucky a few years removed to Illinois John, the son, entered the West Point Ac
Heintzelman (search for this): article 8
t Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was severely wounded. For this he received the brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. At the outbreak of the rebellion Colonel Casey was one of the first to offer his services to the Government, and obtained command of a brigade in August, 1861. On the reorganization of the army under Gen. McClellan he was appointed to the command of a division in Gen. Heintzelman's corps. General McClellan's first dispatch, written hastily on the field of battle, did some injustice to General Casey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly a
ful and impressive language of our esteemed neighbor of the Courant, "loose the bonds of every slave upon this continent, and make the whole Southern region a live hell for one generation at least. " News from Fredericksburg — Departure of Gen. King for the Shenandoah Valley. Fredericksburg, Va., June 28. --Gen. King and staff left Fredericksburg to day for the Valley of the Shenandoah, where he assumes command of General Fremont's corps. The news of his removal from the division Gen. King and staff left Fredericksburg to day for the Valley of the Shenandoah, where he assumes command of General Fremont's corps. The news of his removal from the division created great stir, and is regretted by every officer. Last night bands from each of the regiments serenaded the General, and this morning his headquarters was thronged with officers come to say "good-bye." Gen. Pope is daily expected to arrive, though it is not yet known at what point his headquarters will be established. Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oat
Warwick Beauregard (search for this): article 8
rumor from Richmond. City Point,Va, June 27. --Refugees, who have been taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be assigned to important commands shortly. A rumor prevailed in the rebel camp yesterday to the effect that Jackson's forces had ist the Union forces. Davis and Lee, retreating into North Carolina or the Gulf States, with perish in a given period of time from want of animal food, just as Beauregard's army is scattering in Mississippi from the same cause. Before evacuating Corinth, Beauregard contracted for the delivery to his army in Mississippi of 200,00Beauregard contracted for the delivery to his army in Mississippi of 200,000 head of cattle and sheep from the States lying west of the Mississippi. It is in order to transport these cattle across the river that Vicksburg is so resolutely holding out. By this time Fasragut has probably given a good account of that obstinate city, and not another head of cattle will cross the river. The result will
ed, as we are informed by a trustworthy authority, in the grandest Union triumph of the war, and which would probably insure the capture of Richmond, took place at the close of last week, but the particulars we are not permitted to publish, Secretary Stanton having taken upon himself to prohibit the sending of all dispatches from Washington giving the details of the fight. This decision of the Secretary of War will profoundly incense an anxious public. The people who are waging this war h a right to know the news as soon after it is known at Washington as is consistent with the public interest. There may be some good and sufficient reason for keeping back the news; and it is well, perhaps, not to be too hasty in condemning Secretary Stanton; but enough is known to excite the keenest anxiety until the particulars are published and the result understood. There are several obvious theories to account for this suppression of the news. The first and most probable is that the f
at what point his headquarters will be established. Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this ci
Associated Press (search for this): article 8
icate with the President. If you desire it, I will send it to you. It will make four or five thousand words. We have the grandest military triumph over the enemy, and Richmond must fall. C. C. Fulton, Proprietor American, and Agent Associated Press. After waiting patiently for the news, as promised above, until midnight, we were surprised at the reception of the following dispatch: Baltimore, Sunday, June 29--11 P. M. The Secretary of War Decides that nothing can be telegraphed relative to affairs on the Peninsula. Have tried our best to get it off. C. C. Fulton, Agent Associated Press. As a commentary on this, we append the following, which was received from the War Department yesterday afternoon: War Department, Washington, June 29, 2 o'clock P. M. As soon as the Department can obtain exact in formation of the state of affairs in front of Richmond, it will be imparted to the public, whether good or bad. This dispatch is not intended for
thing definite upon which to base it, be it good or bad. Resignation of Gen. Fremont.[from the Hartford (Conn.) times, June 28.] All true friends of the counng Gen. Pope, a true soldier of proved military skill and efficiency, over General Fremont, the mere political Abolition aspirant for the Presidency; and they will sedge and genius. He has shown his energy and talent in the Western campaign. Fremont has exhibited no military skill, but has proved himself to be incompetent to csburg to day for the Valley of the Shenandoah, where he assumes command of General Fremont's corps. The news of his removal from the division created great stir, anck placed here want for nothing which money can procure. What is said of Fremont's conduct. The conduct of Gen. Fremont has forfeited the support of nearlyGen. Fremont has forfeited the support of nearly all of those, who were ardently supporting him. Many who were his strongest friends are now willing to "whistle him down the wind." They believe that he has committe
M'Clellan (search for this): article 8
tion of the President is university approved, and the conduct of General Banks highly commended. Important rumor from Richmond. City Point,Va, June 27. --Refugees, who have been taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be assigned to important commands shortly. A rumor prevailed in the rebel camp yesterday to the effect that Jackson's forces had arrived and had turned McClellan's fight wing. M'Clellan's headquarters. The army correspondent of the Philadelphia Press thus describes the headquarters of the commander of the army of the Potomac: "In the corner of a field of five hundred acres surrounded on two sides by woodland, the tents are pitched. The camp is on a hill, a quarter of a railed from any road, and the whole covers a space of four acres. The ground plan of the camp is a parallelogram, with the staff tents on the long sides, the General's tent on the short side near
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