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Charles C. Fulton (search for this): article 8
esire it, I will send it to you. It will make four or five thousand words. We have the grandest military triumph over the enemy, and Richmond must fall. C. C. Fulton, Proprietor American, and Agent Associated Press. After waiting patiently for the news, as promised above, until midnight, we were surprised at the reception e 29--11 P. M. The Secretary of War Decides that nothing can be telegraphed relative to affairs on the Peninsula. Have tried our best to get it off. C. C. Fulton, Agent Associated Press. As a commentary on this, we append the following, which was received from the War Department yesterday afternoon: War Departmenublic, whether good or bad. This dispatch is not intended for publication, but for the information of the press. The Baltimore News Sheet says that Charles C. Fulton was on Monday sent to Fort McHenry for publishing "certain unauthorized news" regarding the movements of Gen. McClellan. We take the following extracts from
news of his removal from the division created great stir, and is regretted by every officer. Last night bands from each of the regiments serenaded the General, and this morning his headquarters was thronged with officers come to say "good-bye." Gen. Pope is daily expected to arrive, though it is not yet known at what point his headquarters will be established. Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev
John Bull (search for this): article 8
advices, public and private, from England, indicate a spirit of restiveness in that country on American matter, more significant than any hitherto manifested. It is stated that the tone of the last dispatches received at the State Department is not altogether satisfactory, but that nothing is said from which it could be at all inferred that the European Powers designed taking any immediate steps toward mediation.--The defeat of the Militia bill in the Canadian Parliament has not improved John Bull's temper, and he will seize upon the reverse at Charleston with as much avidity as he did upon that in Banks department. On this subject Hon. J. A. Gurley has received a letter from a highly intelligent adopted citizen of Ohio, who has been in England for the past six months, spending much time in the cotton district. He says: Firstly — I have the best reasons for knowing that intervention in our affairs was determined upon by England and France some months ago, and for the reason
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): article 8
y. We have a variety of rumors, one of which is that Stonewall Jackson has appeared on McClellan's right, and is menacing thons for authority, there is some reason for believing that Jackson has arrived in the neighborhood of Richmond, and joined hiwing to a close, the Confederate leaders may conclude that Jackson can employ his forces in no way so well as to abandon the would be, by the diversions which the sudden appearance of Jackson, or some one else, in our rear would tend to produce. If Jackson has abandoned the Shenandoah, and is co-operating in the neighborhood of the Chickahominy, there will be, of courdone, I will say the country may rest assured that in case Jackson has made his appearance in the quarter alleged, he will fin unpleasant rumor, by way of City Point, that "Stonewall" Jackson turned the right of Gen. McClellan's line on Thursday lastn taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be a
side nearest the road and the guard tents on the other. At the upper end of this parallelogram a space a hundred feet square is marked out, constantly guarded by sentinels and upon which no one, no matter how high in position, is allowed to encroach. In the centre, of this sacred spot are two wall tents, each about twenty feet square, set alongside of one another, though with a slight intervening space. The left hand one is occupied by Gen. McClellan, the other by his father-in-law, Gen. Marey, the Chief of Staff. Both are furnished alike, each has a stove, camp stools and table, corsage camp bed, desk and toilet materials, and various wine bottles lying about denote the means used even by Major- Generals to beguile weary hours and entertain visitors. In front of the General's tent a hundred feet wide street runs to the opposite side of the camp, where two or three peaked Sibley tents are pitched to accommodate the soldiers acting as the camp guard. On each side of this Stree
rs we take sketches of three of the Federal Generals, commencing with the unhappy. Brigadier-General Silas Casey. Brigadier-General Silas Casey commanded the advance division at the battle of Fair Oaks. --General Casey was born in Rhode Island about the year 1806; entered West Point in 1822; graduated in 1826, and entered the Seventh infantry; was promoted to First Lieutenant in June, 1836, and Captain in July, 1839. In the Florida war Captain Casey served with distinction under General Worth. He served also throughout the Mexican war, and added still further to his reputation for gallantry. At Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was severely wounded. For this he received the brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. At the outbreak of the rebellion Colonel Casey was one of the first to offer his services to the Government, and obtained command of a brigade in August, 1861.
lled and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec, he again attracted attention by his gallant and meritorious conduct, and was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel. At the close of the war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated t
Stonewall (search for this): article 8
spatches to the War Department, Until he was heard from it may have been deemed inexpedient to make any publication of the disjointed facts in possession of the Government. Another and not so hopeful view of the case may be that after the telegraph agent left the ground to take his special message to Washington another battle may have taken place not so favorable to our arms, or which had not been concluded up to last evening. There is an unpleasant rumor, by way of City Point, that "Stonewall" Jackson turned the right of Gen. McClellan's line on Thursday last, but the authority for it is very bad, and then the Associated Press news must be later. We incline to the belief that a victory has been won, and that General McClellan is now in or near Richmond. In a few hours, however, we hope that the public may be relieved from its painful suspense. The Withheld news from Richmond.[from the New York times, June 30.] The public appetite, which was whetted last night, at
Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering al
ers designed taking any immediate steps toward mediation.--The defeat of the Militia bill in the Canadian Parliament has not improved John Bull's temper, and he will seize upon the reverse at Charleston with as much avidity as he did upon that in Banks department. On this subject Hon. J. A. Gurley has received a letter from a highly intelligent adopted citizen of Ohio, who has been in England for the past six months, spending much time in the cotton district. He says: Firstly — I have now willing to "whistle him down the wind." They believe that he has committed political suicide, and will never be able to recover from this last most miserable fear pas, The action of the President is university approved, and the conduct of General Banks highly commended. Important rumor from Richmond. City Point,Va, June 27. --Refugees, who have been taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be assigned
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