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O. M. Price (search for this): article 8
y supporting him. Many who were his strongest friends are now willing to "whistle him down the wind." They believe that he has committed political suicide, and will never be able to recover from this last most miserable fear pas, The action of the President is university approved, and the conduct of General Banks highly commended. Important rumor from Richmond. City Point,Va, June 27. --Refugees, who have been taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be assigned to important commands shortly. A rumor prevailed in the rebel camp yesterday to the effect that Jackson's forces had arrived and had turned McClellan's fight wing. M'Clellan's headquarters. The army correspondent of the Philadelphia Press thus describes the headquarters of the commander of the army of the Potomac: "In the corner of a field of five hundred acres surrounded on two sides by woodland, the tents are pitched
of foreigners who can not speak English. It is indeed fortunate if the Administration has got rid of this office-seeking Abolitionist. It is fortunate for the country; for his ignorance of military operations would certainly have brought further and greater disasters upon the army of that department. Let him be commander- in-chief of the Abolitionists, with "no subordinate," since he has resigned his military commission for being placed in a subordinate position. He is fit only for Garrison's army of destructive, who desire to live under an "unwritten Constitution, " so that they may, to use the beautiful and impressive language of our esteemed neighbor of the Courant, "loose the bonds of every slave upon this continent, and make the whole Southern region a live hell for one generation at least. " News from Fredericksburg — Departure of Gen. King for the Shenandoah Valley. Fredericksburg, Va., June 28. --Gen. King and staff left Fredericksburg to day for the Valle
led. In the event of success before Richmond, the war on the Atlantic, like the war on the Mississippi, will virtually be over. There will still remain small armies to be dispersed here and there, forts to be taken, guerrillas to be shot. But the critical question of the division of the Union will have been determined. For there is no section of country south of Virginia and Tennessee in which the rebels can subsist such an army as could hope to resist the Union forces. Davis and Lee, retreating into North Carolina or the Gulf States, with perish in a given period of time from want of animal food, just as Beauregard's army is scattering in Mississippi from the same cause. Before evacuating Corinth, Beauregard contracted for the delivery to his army in Mississippi of 200,000 head of cattle and sheep from the States lying west of the Mississippi. It is in order to transport these cattle across the river that Vicksburg is so resolutely holding out. By this time Fasragut ha
Washington (search for this): article 8
war, and which would probably insure the capture of Richmond, took place at the close of last week, but the particulars we are not permitted to publish, Secretary Stanton having taken upon himself to prohibit the sending of all dispatches from Washington giving the details of the fight. This decision of the Secretary of War will profoundly incense an anxious public. The people who are waging this war have a right to know the news as soon after it is known at Washington as is consistent wi have been deemed inexpedient to make any publication of the disjointed facts in possession of the Government. Another and not so hopeful view of the case may be that after the telegraph agent left the ground to take his special message to Washington another battle may have taken place not so favorable to our arms, or which had not been concluded up to last evening. There is an unpleasant rumor, by way of City Point, that "Stonewall" Jackson turned the right of Gen. McClellan's line on Thu
ments serenaded the General, and this morning his headquarters was thronged with officers come to say "good-bye." Gen. Pope is daily expected to arrive, though it is not yet known at what point his headquarters will be established. Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Ale
g exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering altogether some 1,800. The buildings are kept clear and well ventilated, and the patients receive the best care and attention. Yesterday delegations of citizens from nearly every loyal State visited these and were escorted through the different reatas of each building. Although no State excepting
men in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering altogether some 1,800. The
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 8
nd was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec, he again attracted attention by his gallant and meritorious conduct, and was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel. At the close of the war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated to California. The outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861. to February, 1862. he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his duty being to prevent the rebels crossing the river, and to amuse them with their river stockade while McClellan was getting his army into trim. This difficult duty he performed admirably. Maj. Gen. John Pope. Major-Gen. John Pope
Hendricks (search for this): article 8
nson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering altogether some 1,800. The buildings are kept clear and well ventilated, and the patients receive the best care and attention. Yesterday de
erence of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering altogether some 1,800. The buildings are kept clear and well ventilated, and the patients receive the
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