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Samuel Sloan (search for this): article 6
Later from the North. Northern papers of the 23d say that Gen. Lee is retiring from Winchester. They give the following items of interest: Democratic meeting in New York. A very large Democratic meeting was held in Brooklyn on the 22d inst. Samuel Sloan, President of the Hudson River Railroad, presided. The New York Herald, in its summary of the proceedings, says: One of the resolutions "arraigned and denounced" the proclamation of the President emancipating the slaves, and this resolution was loudly cheered and adopted. The first speaker — after a few remarks by the President — was the Hon. Horatio Seymour. He declared that the events of the last few weeks had essentially changed the relationship of the Democratic party to the Government, and that that party was now the "master of the situation." An allusion in his speech to the Governor of Massachusetts brought down hisses for Governor Andrew, while another allusion to General McClellan brought down rounds of
Later from the North. Northern papers of the 23d say that Gen. Lee is retiring from Winchester. They give the following items of interest: Democratic meeting in New York. A very large Democratic meeting was held in Brooklyn on the 22d inst. Samuel Sloan, President of the Hudson River Railroad, presided. The New York Herald, in its summary of the proceedings, says: One of the resolutions "arraigned and denounced" the proclamation of the President emancipating the slaves, and this resolution was loudly cheered and adopted. The first speaker — after a few remarks by the President — was the Hon. Horatio Seymour. He declared that the events of the last few weeks had essentially changed the relationship of the Democratic party to the Government, and that that party was now the "master of the situation." An allusion in his speech to the Governor of Massachusetts brought down hisses for Governor Andrew, while another allusion to General McClellan brought down rounds of
October 22nd (search for this): article 6
Movements in the west. Dispatches from Cincinnati state that Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, who recently shot Gen. Nelson, at Louisville, has been placed in command of the Union forces in Covington, Ky. Humphrey Marshall is said to be retreating from Mount Sterling towards East Tennessee, with a force of 3,000 men. The Federal troops were in pursuit. Gen. Bragg is moving through Cumberland Gap and Gen. Buell is lying with his main army at Crab Orchard. Money Market. New York, Oct. 22 --P. M.--Virginia 6's 68 to 68½; North Carolina 6's 68½. The Board of Brokers this morning, by a very large majority, decided not to allow transactions within the Board in gold or demand notes, after Monday next. As soon as the vote was known, gold, which had risen from 132 to 134, fell to 199. At this figure everybody rushed in to buy, and the price rose steadily to 130, 131, 132 and 132½. The last price of the day was 132½ Demand notes fluctuated about as rapidly between 127 and
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