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Doolittle (search for this): article 3
e. He is the son of Zadoc Pratt, Greene county, N. Y., which he represented two years in the State Senate. Col. Pratt was a man of fortune and of education, and had traveled extensively in Europe. Captain Easton was a most capable artillerist, and as brave as he was capable. He won honorable mention in the battle at Drainesville, as also did Lieut. Prime, who was killed with him. He lost all his pieces, but not until he had lost his life in trying to keep them from the enemy. Dr. Doolittle, of Duryea's Zouaves, who was wounded in the ankle, had six men of his regiment captured by the rebels. They were taken just this side of Gaines's Mill. A few moments earlier and the enemy would have captured two officers. A Puff from the gallows. A negro named Hawkins was hung in New York on the 27th ult. In his address to the crowd around the gallows he gave "Old Abe" a "first rate notice," saying he believed him to be the "best President since the days of Washington." The H
, Stonewall Jack son's advance to Richmond, &c. The Department either had no news, or would give none out; and the former was probably true, as the wires were either out or not working well. The rumors, therefore, run riot, commencing as soon as the morning services were over at church and continuing till midnight. This circulation of rumors, however, was a game that two sides could as well play at as one, and accordingly a great Union victory was recorded on both sides of the bulletin at Willard's, concluding with a notice that an excursion pleasure party would set out from Washington for Richmond on the 4th of July! This childish trifling in the midst of a known battle and the certain loss of life, was a most disgusting piece of levity, and met with the contempt it deserved. Federal officers killed. a correspondent of the Herald furnishes the following sketch of several of the Federal officers who were reported to have been killed: Colonel Samuel N. Black, of t
dopt a law of confiscation against those persons in the South who refuse to lay down their arms within two months. The most bitter civil war never affects the obligation to respect property. It is pitiful to see the American Republic borrow from the ancient regime one of its most iniquitous laws, without remembering that the press of the U. States has over and again, and most justly, accused Austria and Prussia of high treason against civilization, for having used that weapon in the case of Poland and against Lombardy and Venice." We hope that this will convince the advocates of confiscation that one need not be an enemy of the Federal cause to repudiate their system, and that, on the contrary, the truest friends of that cause are those who are clear-headed enough to point out the errors into which it is likely to fall. Third Gathering of the Emancipation League. With a grand flourish, the Emancipation League paraded the name of Senator Wilson as the orator who would ad
enough and to spare to finish the rebellion. Gen. Hunter's Negro Brigade, &C. [From the New York Express.]or from Port Royal by the arrival to-day is, that Gen. Hunter ordered his newly- organized Negro Brigade to Jamrgeons are on board of the Ericsson, sent home by Gen. Hunter for refusing to act as Brigade Surgeons to the neat from the indispensable force of circumstances, Gen. Hunter will be obliged to leave a great many plantationsthat the negroes, therefore, will be abandoned by Gen. Hunter, as were the white Union men of Jacksonville, Flo. This ill-timed movement cannot be charged on General Hunter; it was in violation of his express orders. GeGeneral Hunter is a soldier; he knows that the success of troops depends on the skill with which they are handle of showing that the order did not proceed from General Hunter, and was not a consequence of the disaster. Ifpt, which never would have been made at all had General Hunter's orders been followed. Judging from the prese
son of Zadoc Pratt, Greene county, N. Y., which he represented two years in the State Senate. Col. Pratt was a man of fortune and of education, and had traveled extensively in Europe. Captain Easton was a most capable artillerist, and as brave as he was capable. He won honorable mention in the battle at Drainesville, as also did Lieut. Prime, who was killed with him. He lost all his pieces, but not until he had lost his life in trying to keep them from the enemy. Dr. Doolittle, of Duryea's Zouaves, who was wounded in the ankle, had six men of his regiment captured by the rebels. They were taken just this side of Gaines's Mill. A few moments earlier and the enemy would have captured two officers. A Puff from the gallows. A negro named Hawkins was hung in New York on the 27th ult. In his address to the crowd around the gallows he gave "Old Abe" a "first rate notice," saying he believed him to be the "best President since the days of Washington." The Herald says:
eat risks in a subordinate and disconnected operation, while so much is staked on the main movement before Richmond. General Benham's violation of orders and rash attack on the Confederate batteries, may be fairly regarded as one of the fruits, if not of Mr. Stanton's anti-strategic order, certainly of the same order of military ideas. Benham had been ordered, through the Adjutant-General, to report at Washington; he stated in this city yesterday that the order had reached him previous to the on James Island will still further rekindle their confidence, and make their resistance more determined at Richmond. Gen. Benham's attack is a costly and inexcusable blunder. Until the fate of the Confederate capital is decided, no risks shou would have been made at all had General Hunter's orders been followed. Judging from the present aspect of the facts, Gen. Benham ought to be cashiered for misconduct. The confiscation measures. [From the Courier des Etats Unis, of New York.]
a grand flourish, the Emancipation League paraded the name of Senator Wilson as the orator who would address them at Cooper Institute on last night. It being ascertained that Mr. Wilson could not come, they advertised Rev. Dr. Cheever and Mr. O. A. Brownson. The fame of these gentlemen attracted exactly 216 persons to Cooper Institute, 41 of whom occupied the platform. As the clock told the hour of 81, the audience aforesaid manifested, in the usual manner, signs of impatience, whereupon Mr. Hart advanced to the desk, and apologized for the non-appearance of Mr. Wilson, on the ground of public duty; for the absence of Mr. Brownson, because he had not promised to come; and for the absence of Dr. Cheever, who is in "delicate health. " He then read the following letter from Senator Wilson: Senate Chamber, June 18, 1862. Dear Sir: I deeply regret that I cannot fulfill my engagement to speak on the 19th for your Association. When I made the engagement I thought we should be
chusetts regiment, also fell at the head of his command. He was a graduate of West Point, and took an active part in the Utah. campaign. He was a man of fine scholarly attainments, a splendid disciplinarian, and much beloved by his associate officers and regiment. Colonel Roberts, First Michigan regiment, is also reported among the killed. He was, I believe, a graduate of West Point. His regiment was the one commanded by Col. Wilcox at Bull Run, now held a prisoner of war, with Colonel Corcoran, by the rebels. Col. McQuade, Fourteenth New York Volunteers, was seen to fall from his horse. He is reported killed, but it is more probable that he was taken prisoner, as his body was not afterwards discovered, although his horse was found. The Colonel is well known in New York politics, having served in the New York Legislature two terms, and officiated as clerk of the House several years. For some time he has been Acting Brigadier-General of the Second Brigade, in General Mo
was a gallant officer. He was severely wounded in front of Yorktown, but refused to take a furlough. The above is only the beginning of the list of officers killed. I have given the names of those occurring to my mind whom I knew personally. The list of wounded is very much larger of course. At Savage's Station alone, I am told, four hundred have been taken, all the buildings about here having been filled to repletion. It is certain that the wounded are well taken care of. Major Russell is a relative of Gen. McClellan. He was an able, popular and efficient officer. Col. Pratt was reckoned among the most capable and trusty volunteer officers in the service. He is the son of Zadoc Pratt, Greene county, N. Y., which he represented two years in the State Senate. Col. Pratt was a man of fortune and of education, and had traveled extensively in Europe. Captain Easton was a most capable artillerist, and as brave as he was capable. He won honorable mention in the b
H. Wilson (search for this): article 3
Emancipation League. With a grand flourish, the Emancipation League paraded the name of Senator Wilson as the orator who would address them at Cooper Institute on last night. It being ascertained that Mr. Wilson could not come, they advertised Rev. Dr. Cheever and Mr. O. A. Brownson. The fame of these gentlemen attracted exactly 216 persons to Cooper Institute, 41 of whom occupied the platf impatience, whereupon Mr. Hart advanced to the desk, and apologized for the non-appearance of Mr. Wilson, on the ground of public duty; for the absence of Mr. Brownson, because he had not promised toabsence of Dr. Cheever, who is in "delicate health. " He then read the following letter from Senator Wilson: Senate Chamber, June 18, 1862. Dear Sir: I deeply regret that I cannot fulfillect of duty. After the adjournment I will fulfill this engagement if desired. Yours, truly, H. Wilson. The letter was received in profound silence by the audience, and in the same dolefu
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