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d and 5,000 killed. Brashear City, La., was re-occupied by the yankees on the 23d of July. The C. S. steamer Florida sailed from Bermuda on the 25th ult., after receiving coal and all necessary repairs. The coal she received was brought by the steamer Harriet Pinckney from Halifax. The expedition which left Vicksburg a few days ago has arrived at Port Hudson. Gen. Grant, it is said, commands in person. Its destination is unknown. The recent cavalry raid from Norfolk to Jackson. N. C., found the Confederates entrenched strongly at Jackson, which commands the approaches to Weldon, and was forced to return. Claims for damages to the total amount of over seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, for losses resulting from the recent riots in New York, have already been presented. It has been decided that it will be safe and expedient to send the Washington and New York mails to New Orleans via the Mississippi river. Arrangements have been made for a convoy
the enrollment in the 13th district of this State, and is prepared to make a draft as soon as directed. He enrolled about 18,000 names, and arrested a large number of deserters. He was obliged to place the town of Marion, the residence of Congressman Allen, under martial law. Pickets were stationed around the town, and orders issued preventing persons leaving the place without passes. Mr. Allen attempted to pass the guards, and was brought before Provost Marshal Phillips, where he demanded tMr. Allen attempted to pass the guards, and was brought before Provost Marshal Phillips, where he demanded to know if a Congressman was obliged to obey the orders of a petty Provost-Marshal. He was told all were subject to enrollment, and no one could receive a pass without taking the oath of allegiance to the United States Government, which he refused to do on the ground that it would compromise him with his constituents and force him to violate certain pledges he had made. He therefore remains an involuntary prisoner within the limits of Marion. A dispatch from Washington, dated the 2d inst
est reduced. Advices from Charleston to the 29th ult., received in New York by the transport Belvidere, state that Gen. Gilmore had succeeded in creating a long line of batteries within 250 yards of Fort Wagner. He had also mounted three heavy s assault of the 19th of July upon Fort Wagner. Our losses since that time have not averaged more than four per day. General Gilmore has now fourteen Parrott guns and mortars in position on Morris's island. For the present, the idea of taking Fort e sand of which that work is composed; the breach made by one shall being soon filled up by the explosion of another. Gen. Gilmore is confident that with his heavy siege guns he can breach Fort Sumter. The 10th Connecticut regiment occupies the, Eldridge, from Port Royal, S. C., July 31st, reached here last evening. The siege of Fort Wagner still continued. Gen. Gilmore has mounted a number of 200 pounder siege guns within one mile of Fort Sumter. He is confident of reducing both Sumte
ed up by the explosion of another. Gen. Gilmore is confident that with his heavy siege guns he can breach Fort Sumter. The 10th Connecticut regiment occupies the riffe-pite within 250 yards of Fort Wagnes. --Col. Otin, of this regiment, came here on the Belvidere for the purpose of taking drafted men. The Belvidere has on board the 174th Pennsylvania regiment numbering 417 noncommissioned and privates, whose term of service has expired. The United States steam transport Fulton, Eldridge, from Port Royal, S. C., July 31st, reached here last evening. The siege of Fort Wagner still continued. Gen. Gilmore has mounted a number of 200 pounder siege guns within one mile of Fort Sumter. He is confident of reducing both Sumter and Wagner in a short time. Outrage on Confederate officers — Morgat treated as a Convict. The New York World, of Monday, has an editorial on the conduct of Gen. Burnsides, from which we learn that Morgan and his officers, now in the Ohio penite
ent. Miscellaneous. A surgeon who is engaged at Gettysburg, ascertains the Federal loss to be 14,200 wounded and 5,000 killed. Brashear City, La., was re-occupied by the yankees on the 23d of July. The C. S. steamer Florida sailed from Bermuda on the 25th ult., after receiving coal and all necessary repairs. The coal she received was brought by the steamer Harriet Pinckney from Halifax. The expedition which left Vicksburg a few days ago has arrived at Port Hudson. Gen. Grant, it is said, commands in person. Its destination is unknown. The recent cavalry raid from Norfolk to Jackson. N. C., found the Confederates entrenched strongly at Jackson, which commands the approaches to Weldon, and was forced to return. Claims for damages to the total amount of over seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, for losses resulting from the recent riots in New York, have already been presented. It has been decided that it will be safe and expedient to send t
ady been presented. It has been decided that it will be safe and expedient to send the Washington and New York mails to New Orleans via the Mississippi river. Arrangements have been made for a convoy at least once a week from Vicksburg to New Orleans, and convoys can be more frequent when required by the necessities of trade or public interest. Gold was quoted in New York Saturday at 129¾. By way of San Francisco we learn that the latest news from Japan stated that war with France and England was certain, and that the Japanese were much better prepared for it than had been supposed. The following is a dispatch from Cincinnati, dated August 2d: The rebels burned sixty wagon loaded with forage at Stamford, Ky., yesterday. Colonel Sanders reports to Gen Burnside having captured three hundred and fifty rebels near the Cumberland river, including Colonel Ashby. The balance of the raiders are rapidly retreating, having abandoned their plunder at Irvin, Ky.
Gen Stuart (search for this): article 6
at Stevensburg, four miles from Culpeper. The Confederates have a very strong picket line across the Rappahannock, but do not seem to be in any considerable force as far up as Fredericksburg. The following dispatch from Washington, August 2d, gives an account of the reconnaissance: General Buford's cavalry, artillery, and a supporting infantry force, yesterday crossed the Rappahannock at the railroad station.--Thence with his cavalry and artillery he proceeded toward Culpeper, driving Stuart's cavalry before him. When near Culpeper Gen'l Raford encountered a large rebel force of infantry and artillery, and a fierce light ensued, lasting until dark, when he withdrew to a strong position east of Beandy Station. The losses on both sides was considerable. This reconnaissance confirms the concentration of Lee's forces near Culpeper, and indicates that his present headquarters are at Stevensburg, four miles southeast of Culpeper. The twenty nine sutler wagon captured near Fairf
red two others of Mosby's band near New Baltimore, and were engaged in ferreting out others.--Yesterday and to-day the weather has been by far the hottest of the season. All quiet to-night. Another dispatch says: The rebel forces are still between the Rapidan and the Rappahannock, and have made no movement eastward. It is not true that our forces occupy the city of Fredericksburg. The weather has been intensely hot where the army is stationed during the past two days. Lieut Col. Lovell, of the Second Massachusetts regiment, has recaptured all prisoners, wagons, supplies, &c., taken by Mosby's guerillas at Fairfax on Thursday night. The rebel escape was out off, and for the first time Mosby has been thwarted in his bold and desperate raids. The value of the goods, horses, &c., recaptured, which mostly belonged to suiters, is estimated at $150,000. Protection to negro soldiers — retaliation. A telegram from Washington gives the following official order of Li
ederates have a very strong picket line across the Rappahannock, but do not seem to be in any considerable force as far up as Fredericksburg. The following dispatch from Washington, August 2d, gives an account of the reconnaissance: General Buford's cavalry, artillery, and a supporting infantry force, yesterday crossed the Rappahannock at the railroad station.--Thence with his cavalry and artillery he proceeded toward Culpeper, driving Stuart's cavalry before him. When near Culpeper Gen'l Raford encountered a large rebel force of infantry and artillery, and a fierce light ensued, lasting until dark, when he withdrew to a strong position east of Beandy Station. The losses on both sides was considerable. This reconnaissance confirms the concentration of Lee's forces near Culpeper, and indicates that his present headquarters are at Stevensburg, four miles southeast of Culpeper. The twenty nine sutler wagon captured near Fairfax Thursday night by Mosby and his band were recapt
New York Saturday (search for this): article 6
f over seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, for losses resulting from the recent riots in New York, have already been presented. It has been decided that it will be safe and expedient to send the Washington and New York mails to New Orleans via the Mississippi river. Arrangements have been made for a convoy at least once a week from Vicksburg to New Orleans, and convoys can be more frequent when required by the necessities of trade or public interest. Gold was quoted in New York Saturday at 129¾. By way of San Francisco we learn that the latest news from Japan stated that war with France and England was certain, and that the Japanese were much better prepared for it than had been supposed. The following is a dispatch from Cincinnati, dated August 2d: The rebels burned sixty wagon loaded with forage at Stamford, Ky., yesterday. Colonel Sanders reports to Gen Burnside having captured three hundred and fifty rebels near the Cumberland river, including
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