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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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d ever saw. McClellan is "a barren rascal," as Malvolio says, and never invented anything but a lie in his life. Yet he is unrivalled in this, his peculiar talent. Even his lies, however, want all the incidents that render fiction tolerable. They are dull, flat, prosaic, and constructed with so little ingenuity that the smallest capacity can detect them. They very much resemble his tactics, in which we vainly look for a spark of that genius which illuminate the campaigns of Frederic and Napoleon, and make us half forget the misery they inflicted in our admiration of the consummate skill with which they were conducted. His strategy consists simply, in the eternal use of the spade and shovel, and with the exception of Rich Mountain his victories were all gained upon paper. The New York Tribune is preparing to sift the forthcoming report to the bottom. The Herald having asserted that the near prospect of the publication made the radical editors a little nervous, Greeley retorts
nt to know how he can apologize for lying still, without striking a blow, throughout the dreary autumn of 61, and the still drearier winter of--'61 --62, with an army of 100,000 men under canvas, in front of an army not numbering 40,000, and permitting that army at last to march off with all its baggage and artillery, leaving behind only a few Quaker guns to reward the patient endurance of the larger host. They want to know why, with an army of 115,000 men, he halted before the lines of Gen. Magruder, which were guarded by but 10,000.-- They want to know why he suffered a portion of his troops to engage in the bloody and useless combat of Williamsburg, when his whole force was near enough to be precipitated upon the enemy. They want to know why he permitted one wing of his army to be utterly destroyed at Gaines's Mill, while the rest of it was but four or five miles off. They want to know, why he abandoned the lines which he had been all the summer fortifying, and retreated, or rath
but four or five miles off. They want to know, why he abandoned the lines which he had been all the summer fortifying, and retreated, or rather fled, to Malvern Hill, which was not fortified at all, abandoning and burning in his flight property valued at millions of dollars. Lastly, they want to know why, if he really gained a victory at Sharpsburg, he permitted Lee to retreat at his leisure, and to recruit his forces for the battle of Fredericksburg. Such are the subjects upon which the radical press, according to Greeley, are extremely curious, and upon which they hope to be enlightened by the forthcoming publication. Our own curiosity is of the same character with that of Points with regard to the tales which Falstaff would tell to cover his ignominious flight from the scene of his midnight robbery. We are desirous to hear "what monstrous lies he will tell." They will no doubt be of the first magnitude, but so clumsily contrived as to carry their own refutation with them.
enemy. They want to know why he permitted one wing of his army to be utterly destroyed at Gaines's Mill, while the rest of it was but four or five miles off. They want to know, why he abandoned the lines which he had been all the summer fortifying, and retreated, or rather fled, to Malvern Hill, which was not fortified at all, abandoning and burning in his flight property valued at millions of dollars. Lastly, they want to know why, if he really gained a victory at Sharpsburg, he permitted Lee to retreat at his leisure, and to recruit his forces for the battle of Fredericksburg. Such are the subjects upon which the radical press, according to Greeley, are extremely curious, and upon which they hope to be enlightened by the forthcoming publication. Our own curiosity is of the same character with that of Points with regard to the tales which Falstaff would tell to cover his ignominious flight from the scene of his midnight robbery. We are desirous to hear "what monstrous lies
ntain his victories were all gained upon paper. The New York Tribune is preparing to sift the forthcoming report to the bottom. The Herald having asserted that the near prospect of the publication made the radical editors a little nervous, Greeley retorts by giving the Herald the lie direct, declaring at the same time that the publication in question is so exactly the very thing that the aforesaid radicals are desirous of seeing that, while they are doubtful of the propriety of making it Lastly, they want to know why, if he really gained a victory at Sharpsburg, he permitted Lee to retreat at his leisure, and to recruit his forces for the battle of Fredericksburg. Such are the subjects upon which the radical press, according to Greeley, are extremely curious, and upon which they hope to be enlightened by the forthcoming publication. Our own curiosity is of the same character with that of Points with regard to the tales which Falstaff would tell to cover his ignominious fl
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
precipitated upon the enemy. They want to know why he permitted one wing of his army to be utterly destroyed at Gaines's Mill, while the rest of it was but four or five miles off. They want to know, why he abandoned the lines which he had been all the summer fortifying, and retreated, or rather fled, to Malvern Hill, which was not fortified at all, abandoning and burning in his flight property valued at millions of dollars. Lastly, they want to know why, if he really gained a victory at Sharpsburg, he permitted Lee to retreat at his leisure, and to recruit his forces for the battle of Fredericksburg. Such are the subjects upon which the radical press, according to Greeley, are extremely curious, and upon which they hope to be enlightened by the forthcoming publication. Our own curiosity is of the same character with that of Points with regard to the tales which Falstaff would tell to cover his ignominious flight from the scene of his midnight robbery. We are desirous to hear
Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
able. They are dull, flat, prosaic, and constructed with so little ingenuity that the smallest capacity can detect them. They very much resemble his tactics, in which we vainly look for a spark of that genius which illuminate the campaigns of Frederic and Napoleon, and make us half forget the misery they inflicted in our admiration of the consummate skill with which they were conducted. His strategy consists simply, in the eternal use of the spade and shovel, and with the exception of Rich Mountain his victories were all gained upon paper. The New York Tribune is preparing to sift the forthcoming report to the bottom. The Herald having asserted that the near prospect of the publication made the radical editors a little nervous, Greeley retorts by giving the Herald the lie direct, declaring at the same time that the publication in question is so exactly the very thing that the aforesaid radicals are desirous of seeing that, while they are doubtful of the propriety of making it
Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ng behind only a few Quaker guns to reward the patient endurance of the larger host. They want to know why, with an army of 115,000 men, he halted before the lines of Gen. Magruder, which were guarded by but 10,000.-- They want to know why he suffered a portion of his troops to engage in the bloody and useless combat of Williamsburg, when his whole force was near enough to be precipitated upon the enemy. They want to know why he permitted one wing of his army to be utterly destroyed at Gaines's Mill, while the rest of it was but four or five miles off. They want to know, why he abandoned the lines which he had been all the summer fortifying, and retreated, or rather fled, to Malvern Hill, which was not fortified at all, abandoning and burning in his flight property valued at millions of dollars. Lastly, they want to know why, if he really gained a victory at Sharpsburg, he permitted Lee to retreat at his leisure, and to recruit his forces for the battle of Fredericksburg. Such are
Quaker (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
. They have a curiosity to see what defence can be made of conduct which at present appears utterly beyond the reach of any possible apology. They want to know how he can apologize for lying still, without striking a blow, throughout the dreary autumn of 61, and the still drearier winter of--'61 --62, with an army of 100,000 men under canvas, in front of an army not numbering 40,000, and permitting that army at last to march off with all its baggage and artillery, leaving behind only a few Quaker guns to reward the patient endurance of the larger host. They want to know why, with an army of 115,000 men, he halted before the lines of Gen. Magruder, which were guarded by but 10,000.-- They want to know why he suffered a portion of his troops to engage in the bloody and useless combat of Williamsburg, when his whole force was near enough to be precipitated upon the enemy. They want to know why he permitted one wing of his army to be utterly destroyed at Gaines's Mill, while the rest o
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
e guarded by but 10,000.-- They want to know why he suffered a portion of his troops to engage in the bloody and useless combat of Williamsburg, when his whole force was near enough to be precipitated upon the enemy. They want to know why he permitted one wing of his army to be utterly destroyed at Gaines's Mill, while the rest of it was but four or five miles off. They want to know, why he abandoned the lines which he had been all the summer fortifying, and retreated, or rather fled, to Malvern Hill, which was not fortified at all, abandoning and burning in his flight property valued at millions of dollars. Lastly, they want to know why, if he really gained a victory at Sharpsburg, he permitted Lee to retreat at his leisure, and to recruit his forces for the battle of Fredericksburg. Such are the subjects upon which the radical press, according to Greeley, are extremely curious, and upon which they hope to be enlightened by the forthcoming publication. Our own curiosity is of
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