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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1865., [Electronic resource].

Found 532 total hits in 314 results.

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Jordan L. Mott (search for this): article 6
The New York Millionaires. --A letter from New York says: We are in a fair way of finding out who are the wealthiest men in New York, according to their own affidavits before the internal revenue commissioners. Some of these were specified in my letter of yesterday, and, as a matter of general interest, I append a few more: Income for 1864. A. T. Stewart.$1,843,639 Moses Taylor573,494 Ex-Mayor Opdyke112,800 Judge Roosevelt34,486 August Belmont100,930 W. H. Appleton65,147 Judge Betts.15,030 Ex-Collector Barney30,025 John D. Wolfe57,780 Daniel Drew101,290 Ex-Mayor Kingsland60,000 C. Delmonico70,650 Daniel Parrish62,768 S. L. Mitchell109,324 W. O'Briert.90,000 John O'Brien90,000 Rufus T. Andrews22,616 John Jacob Astor, Jr.20,504 John A. Stevens20,385 J. Sturges135,000 T. M.Taylor105,000 George Law68,444 Jordan L. Mott16,615 All these are in the Sixteenth, Eighteenth and Twenty-second Wards, comprising the Eighth District.
Archer B. Smith (search for this): article 8
A very talkative little girl used often to annoy her mother by making remarks about the visitors that came to the house. On one occasion a gentleman was expected, whose nose had been accidentally flattened to his face. The mother cautioned her child particularly to say nothing about this feature. Imagine her consternation when the little one exclaimed, "Ma, you told me not to say anything about Mr. Smith's nose; why, he hasn't got any !"
2d of October, 1864, with an amendment making it more comprehensive. Both of which were unanimously adopted. The House passed a Senate bill to regulate the pay of lieutenants of the navy while commanding on shore, giving them the same pay as when on board ship. The Chair announced the following as the Special Committee on the Exchange of Prisoners: Messrs. Marshall, of Kentucky; Perkins, of Louisiana; Gilmer, of North Carolina; Clark, of Missouri, and Funsten, of Virginia. Mr. Branch, of Texas, introduced a series of patriotic resolutions, adopted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, concerning peace reconstruction and independence, and endorsed them in a series of eloquent and appropriate remarks; at the close of which he moved to lay the resolutions on the table and have them printed. On motion of Mr. Cluskey, of Tennessee, the resolutions were ordered to be spread upon the Journal. On motion of Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, Captain Raphael Semmes, of
Patterson (search for this): article 1
efore them providing for the consolidation of companies, etc., it will be with very radical modifications. The bill, as adopted, will probably be a compromise between the House bill and the bill proposed as an amendment by the Senate Military Committee. When passed, we shall publish it in full. The present shape of either bill would fail to give an idea of what will be the result of the Senate's deliberations. House of Representatives. The House met at 11 o'clock. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Patterson, of the Episcopal Church. The House took up the bill to provide for laying a specie export duty on cotton and tobacco. The question was, on the motion of Mr. Marshall, of Kentucky, to recommit the bill, with instructions to report a bill seizing all the cotton and tobacco in the country on Government account. It was adopted. Yeas, 43; nays, 31. Mr. Miles, from the Military Committee, reported back the Senate joint resolutions of thanks to General Stand Watie and Colone
commended, by way of an amendment, by the Senate Military Committee. While an amendment of Mr. Vest's to the first section of the Senate bill was still under discussion, on motion, by Mr. Johnson, of Missouri, the Senate bill was dropped and House bill considered by sections. When it had been gone through with, Senate bill was again taken up and considered by sections so far as the fifth section. At this time, the majority of Senators having left the hall, Mr. Wigfall moved that the Senaand he wanted to see what could be done. He also stated that he had written a letter to the Speaker of the House, resigning his seat. Mr. Snead, of Missouri, offered the following resolution: "Whereas, Henry S. Foote, a member of this House from the State of Tennessee, having absented himself from it without leave, and having, by his own admission, written and forwarded to the Speaker a letter tendering his resignation as a member of the House, and was thereafter arrested whilat unl
Andrew Johnson (search for this): article 1
rable determination of Congress to continue, with all its energy, the struggle for independence, etc, was concurred in. The Senate proceeded to consider the House bill to authorize the consolidation of companies, battalions and regiments, the pending question being on the adoption of a substitute recommended, by way of an amendment, by the Senate Military Committee. While an amendment of Mr. Vest's to the first section of the Senate bill was still under discussion, on motion, by Mr. Johnson, of Missouri, the Senate bill was dropped and House bill considered by sections. When it had been gone through with, Senate bill was again taken up and considered by sections so far as the fifth section. At this time, the majority of Senators having left the hall, Mr. Wigfall moved that the Senate adjourn until Senators should find leisure to attend to their business. Pending Mr. Wigfall's motion, the Senate, on motion, by Mr. Sparrow, resolved into secret session. Note.--If t
lieutenants of the navy while commanding on shore, giving them the same pay as when on board ship. The Chair announced the following as the Special Committee on the Exchange of Prisoners: Messrs. Marshall, of Kentucky; Perkins, of Louisiana; Gilmer, of North Carolina; Clark, of Missouri, and Funsten, of Virginia. Mr. Branch, of Texas, introduced a series of patriotic resolutions, adopted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, concerning peace reconstruction and independence, and endmission, written and forwarded to the Speaker a letter tendering his resignation as a member of the House, and was thereafter arrested whilat unlawfully attempting to pass to the enemy's capital. "Resolved, That said Henry S. Foote is unworthy to occupy a seat upon the floor of the House, and is hereby expelled." On motion of Mr. Gilmer, it was referred to the Committee on Elections by the following vote: Ayes, 44; noes, 36. The House then, on motion of Mr. Wickham, adjourned.
Representatives. The House met at 11 o'clock. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Patterson, of the Episcopal Church. The House took up the bill to provide for laying a specie export duty on cotton and tobacco. The question was, on the motion of Mr. Marshall, of Kentucky, to recommit the bill, with instructions to report a bill seizing all the cotton and tobacco in the country on Government account. It was adopted. Yeas, 43; nays, 31. Mr. Miles, from the Military Committee, reported back thouse passed a Senate bill to regulate the pay of lieutenants of the navy while commanding on shore, giving them the same pay as when on board ship. The Chair announced the following as the Special Committee on the Exchange of Prisoners: Messrs. Marshall, of Kentucky; Perkins, of Louisiana; Gilmer, of North Carolina; Clark, of Missouri, and Funsten, of Virginia. Mr. Branch, of Texas, introduced a series of patriotic resolutions, adopted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, concerni
e bill was dropped and House bill considered by sections. When it had been gone through with, Senate bill was again taken up and considered by sections so far as the fifth section. At this time, the majority of Senators having left the hall, Mr. Wigfall moved that the Senate adjourn until Senators should find leisure to attend to their business. Pending Mr. Wigfall's motion, the Senate, on motion, by Mr. Sparrow, resolved into secret session. Note.--If the Senate pass either of the Mr. Wigfall's motion, the Senate, on motion, by Mr. Sparrow, resolved into secret session. Note.--If the Senate pass either of the bills now before them providing for the consolidation of companies, etc., it will be with very radical modifications. The bill, as adopted, will probably be a compromise between the House bill and the bill proposed as an amendment by the Senate Military Committee. When passed, we shall publish it in full. The present shape of either bill would fail to give an idea of what will be the result of the Senate's deliberations. House of Representatives. The House met at 11 o'clock. Prayer
k, of Missouri, and Funsten, of Virginia. Mr. Branch, of Texas, introduced a series of patriotic resolutions, adopted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, concerning peace reconstruction and independence, and endorsed them in a series of eloquent and appropriate remarks; at the close of which he moved to lay the resolutions on the table and have them printed. On motion of Mr. Cluskey, of Tennessee, the resolutions were ordered to be spread upon the Journal. On motion of Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, Captain Raphael Semmes, of the Confederate States Navy, was invited to occupy a seat upon the floor of the House during his sojourn in the city. The morning hour having expired, Mr. Foote, of Tennessee, arose to a question of privilege. Mr. Foote said that his rights had been assailed as the representative of a sovereign people, and he desired to vindicate himself. He had been forcibly detained from the House by the interference of certain parties. He would
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