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Philemon Russell (search for this): chapter 9
an occasional passer-by by its size, knotted trunk and branches. Residents are so used to it they think nothing of it, except in cherry-time, when it is besieged by boys. It measures ten feet, four inches in circumference. It is one of three fine-fruited trees which grew here, together with many other excellent varieties of fruit, on what is best known as the Hayes estate. By rough calculation, it must be about seventy-five years old. The Hayes estate of fifty acres was purchased of Philemon Russell, and was remembered by a lady, now deceased, as an extremely pleasant place to visit sixty years or more ago. The cherry trees, red and black ox-hearts, golden porters, and other delicious varieties, a well, and a waving field of mowing, with a cart-path through it, left such an impression that, in after years, when in search of a place for a home, her thoughts turned to this spot, and she was fortunate enough to be able to purchase a lot here. During the Rebellion this tract of level
Columbus Tyler (search for this): chapter 9
d landed, a cloud of dust arose. Old apple trees in the pasture known as Shute's field, on Central street, before it was cut up into house lots, were part of the Rand orchard. A very old apple tree on the easterly side of the street, the one shown in the frontispiece, which was made from a picture taken in war-time, is still cared for by a member of the Rand family. Benjamin Rand set out the row of maples next to the street, on the parsonage lawn, some time between 1850 and 1860. Columbus Tyler afterwards set out many others of different varieties on this place. Rev. Augustus R. Pope began the good work of planting trees on the estate on the corner of Summer and Central streets, now owned by Henry Baker, about 1850. When it passed into the hands of Nathan Tufts, about 1860, there were many varieties, forty, between the gate and the front door. These were thinned out in after years, and others were planted in various parts of the grounds by Mr. Tufts. The horse-chestnut in
C. E. Henderson (search for this): chapter 9
hn F. Ayer, Mrs. Ellen P. Angier, Mr. George L. Baxter, Mr. Josiah Q. Bennett, Mrs. Martha E. Bowman, Miss Alice I. Bradford, Mr. George C. Brackett, Mrs. Hannah C. Brown, Mr. Joseph H. Clark, Mr. Richard E. Cutter, Mrs. Mary J. Davis, Mrs. L. W. Dow, Miss Frances Dow, Mrs. Helen F. Edlefson, Mr. Charles D. Elliot, Mrs. Annie L. Fletcher, Mr. Ellsworth Fisk, Mr. N. E. Fitz, Hon. William H. Furber, Mrs. Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs. Juliet G. Smith, Miss Susan S. Stetson, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss M. Alice Tufts, Miss Martha Tufts, Mr. Timothy Tufts, Miss Louise A. Vinal, Mis
Samuel Tufts Frost (search for this): chapter 9
A row of ten elms of various sizes stands on Somerville avenue, between the Tube Works grounds and Park street. One of them, which appears much older than the rest, in front of the house formerly the headquarters of General Green, is one of two standing here which were of Revolutionary fame. Some of the others in the row, which in old times extended to the Middlesex Bleachery grounds, and numbered eighteen at the time of the widening of Somerville avenue in 1873-4, were set out by Samuel Tufts Frost about 1830. He carried them on his shoulder from the place where they grew. A former resident of Laurel street remembers a large elm tree which loomed up from the vicinity of Dane's ledge, not probably very old, but noticeable, springing up from such unlikely surroundings. The elm on Somerville avenue, near the foot of Central street, is one of the oldest in Somerville, and possibly the largest when in its prime. Twenty-five or thirty years ago some of the smaller branches from
Anson Titus (search for this): chapter 9
Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs. Juliet G. Smith, Miss Susan S. Stetson, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss M. Alice Tufts, Miss Martha Tufts, Mr. Timothy Tufts, Miss Louise A. Vinal, Miss Anna P. Vinal, Miss Edith A. Woodman. (read before the Somerville Historical Society November 7, 1906.) Have we any old trees in Somerville? Yes, a goodly number. It is difficult to find out the exact facts in many cases, but, counting individual trees, there are over forty which are at least 125 years old, and some of them must be older. Half of the number are red cedars, which may be found
Ellen P. Angier (search for this): chapter 9
Some old trees.—number 2 By Sara A. Stone The following persons have aided the writer of this paper by suggestions and information: Mr. John F. Ayer, Mrs. Ellen P. Angier, Mr. George L. Baxter, Mr. Josiah Q. Bennett, Mrs. Martha E. Bowman, Miss Alice I. Bradford, Mr. George C. Brackett, Mrs. Hannah C. Brown, Mr. Joseph H. Clark, Mr. Richard E. Cutter, Mrs. Mary J. Davis, Mrs. L. W. Dow, Miss Frances Dow, Mrs. Helen F. Edlefson, Mr. Charles D. Elliot, Mrs. Annie L. Fletcher, Mr. Ellsworth Fisk, Mr. N. E. Fitz, Hon. William H. Furber, Mrs. Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs
Annie L. Fletcher (search for this): chapter 9
Some old trees.—number 2 By Sara A. Stone The following persons have aided the writer of this paper by suggestions and information: Mr. John F. Ayer, Mrs. Ellen P. Angier, Mr. George L. Baxter, Mr. Josiah Q. Bennett, Mrs. Martha E. Bowman, Miss Alice I. Bradford, Mr. George C. Brackett, Mrs. Hannah C. Brown, Mr. Joseph H. Clark, Mr. Richard E. Cutter, Mrs. Mary J. Davis, Mrs. L. W. Dow, Miss Frances Dow, Mrs. Helen F. Edlefson, Mr. Charles D. Elliot, Mrs. Annie L. Fletcher, Mr. Ellsworth Fisk, Mr. N. E. Fitz, Hon. William H. Furber, Mrs. Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs
Ellen M. Sawyer (search for this): chapter 9
, Mrs. Annie L. Fletcher, Mr. Ellsworth Fisk, Mr. N. E. Fitz, Hon. William H. Furber, Mrs. Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs. Juliet G. Smith, Miss Susan S. Stetson, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss M. Alice Tufts, Miss Martha Tufts, Mr. Timothy Tufts, Miss Louise A. Vinal, Miss Anna P. Vinal, Miss Edith A. Woodman. (read before the Somerville Historical Society November 7, 1906.) Have we any old trees in Somerville? Yes, a goodly number. It is difficult to find out the exact facts in many cases, but, counting individual trees, there are over forty which are at least 125 years o
Susan S. Stetson (search for this): chapter 9
iam H. Furber, Mrs. Martha J. H. Gerry, Mr. Albert L. Haskell, Mr. Frank M. Hawes, Mrs. Helen E. Heald, Mrs. C. E. Henderson, Miss Bertha E. Holden, Mrs. Fannie C. Jaques, Mr. A. M. Kidder, Mr. George A. Kimball, Mrs. Eleanor G. Kirkpatrick, Miss Georgia Lears, Mrs. Martha E. Libby, Mr. Jairus Mann, Mr. David L. Maulsby, Mr. Henry C. Rand, Hon. Francis H. Raymond, Mrs. Raymond, Mr. Edwin F. Read, Mr. Aaron Sargent, Miss Ellen M. Sawyer, Miss Margaret A. Simpson, Mrs. Juliet G. Smith, Miss Susan S. Stetson, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss M. Alice Tufts, Miss Martha Tufts, Mr. Timothy Tufts, Miss Louise A. Vinal, Miss Anna P. Vinal, Miss Edith A. Woodman. (read before the Somerville Historical Society November 7, 1906.) Have we any old trees in Somerville? Yes, a goodly number. It is difficult to find out the exact facts in many cases, but, counting individual trees, there are over forty which are at least 125 years old, and some of them must be older. Half of the number are red cedars
Lewis C. Flanagan (search for this): chapter 9
ys of the neighborhood. As is often the case, at one time they wished to build a fire. The tree was still small, and, with unusual thoughtfulness, they inverted a barrel over it to protect it from the heat. Pond, tree, and island are now things of the past, and looking at the spot, now built over with houses, it is difficult to see where a local poet drew his inspiration for the following poem, one of many dainty productions from the pen of a lifelong resident of Somerville, nearly, Lewis C. Flanagan:— Pine Island Pond. Tis even so; within our city's bounds We have a pond; not one with bottom paved And edges curbed with stone, but rough and plain From Nature's hand; nor large, nor deep, yet still A pond; and equi-distant from its shores An island stands; and though a modest lump Of earth, that may not be compared with those On which the salt waves lay their angry hands, By geographic rule as much an isle As Cuba's slope or Iceland's stormy pile. The urchin small, when asked to
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