hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Emory Upton 164 4 Browse Search
G. W. C. Lee 147 1 Browse Search
Clinton Beckwith 129 5 Browse Search
Henry Upton 63 1 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 56 2 Browse Search
Horatio G. Wright 53 3 Browse Search
James W. Cronkite 50 4 Browse Search
John B. Gordon 47 1 Browse Search
John Sedgwick 44 2 Browse Search
Egbert Olcott 44 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry. Search the whole document.

Found 81 total hits in 35 results.

1 2 3 4
John R. Adams (search for this): chapter 4
we do of them to-night. How well we remember the old days, and how pleasant to recall the many thrilling incidents which connected us so closely! With our two regiments on the front line facing the enemy, led by the gallant Colonels Upton and Edwards, we had that feeling that the Japs must have had when facing the Russians in the present Eastern war, that we can whip everything before us, and we generally did it, too. We do not forget the life and services of the faithful Chaplain, John R. Adams, who remained with us after the return home of the 5th Maine. The death of this honored officer only increases our affection for them all. We love to let our memories run back to those days and call up in our minds those strong, sturdy Maine boys. By reason of their few months' previous service they were in a position to be very useful to us, as we, fresh from our homes, tried to get accustomed to a campaign life. We learned rapidly from them. They taught us just what a new regiment
ttalion movements, when all of a sudden we were astonished by news that McClellan had fallen back from Harrison's Landing, Pope was falling back from Culpeper Court House, Jackson was on Pope's flank, and Lee was partially between Pope and McClellan,Pope's flank, and Lee was partially between Pope and McClellan, and Washington. Everything was magnified in the most outrageous manner. What really had happened was serious enough. McClellan's army was concentrated at Harrison's Landing, discouraged by defeat, the defeat of its commander, not of its constitPope and McClellan, and Washington. Everything was magnified in the most outrageous manner. What really had happened was serious enough. McClellan's army was concentrated at Harrison's Landing, discouraged by defeat, the defeat of its commander, not of its constituency, destitute of equipment and supplies on account of the capture and destruction of artillery and trains. Pope, with the forces able to be gathered for the purpose, was not able to resist the attack of the victorious Confederate army, in the serPope, with the forces able to be gathered for the purpose, was not able to resist the attack of the victorious Confederate army, in the series of engagements that constituted the second battle of Bull Run; and flushed with this further triumph, Lee was leading his forces forward in an attempt to capture Washington. They were already in Maryland, concentrating in the vicinity of Frederi
ny and enlisted in the 91st N. Y. Infantry, and with them went to Florida where he was unable to endure the climate, and was discharged for disability. Returning to his home in Utica, he so recovered his health that he determined to re-enlist, and after visiting several recruiting stations decided to enter the 121st. He was made a corporal in Company B. He has entitled the story of his war experiences, Three Years with the Colors of a Fighting Regiment in the Army of the Potomac, by a Private Soldier. Passing over the very interesting account of his previous experiences I quote from his journal, beginning at the departure from Camp Schuyler. My life in camp at Camp Schuyler was thoroughly enjoyed by me and I never pass it now without recollections of a pleasant nature surging to my memory. After we had been uniformed and equipped, we were sent to New York and Washington, without special incident-feeding at the old cooper shop in Philadelphia, and getting a tough meal at Washingt
John M. Edwards (search for this): chapter 4
s ever. We are glad to learn and hear something of our comrades of the 5th Maine to-day. Their representative assures us that we are not forgotten. Conditions with them are about the same as with us. At their annual reunions they speak of us, as we do of them to-night. How well we remember the old days, and how pleasant to recall the many thrilling incidents which connected us so closely! With our two regiments on the front line facing the enemy, led by the gallant Colonels Upton and Edwards, we had that feeling that the Japs must have had when facing the Russians in the present Eastern war, that we can whip everything before us, and we generally did it, too. We do not forget the life and services of the faithful Chaplain, John R. Adams, who remained with us after the return home of the 5th Maine. The death of this honored officer only increases our affection for them all. We love to let our memories run back to those days and call up in our minds those strong, sturdy Maine
Benny West (search for this): chapter 4
t obscured the moving columns from view. We had passed through scrubby pine patches that were on fire, which added to our discomfort. Along in the afternoon the road ran along and around the base of the mountain, a massive sugar loaf shaped prominence. I had felt more than ordinarily well during the day, the perspiration flowed from my pores profusely. We were talking and joking as we moved along. Suddenly I felt a sort of faintness come over me, the perspiration stopped and I said to Benny West, who was marching beside me, I feel very strange. He asked me what was the matter, and before I could answer him I felt the sky grow dark, the world whirl round, and conscious that I was going to fall I made a last effort to reach the road side, and lost track of surrounding events. When I regained my senses I found Rounds and Tarbell, of my company, beside me and myself wet from the liberal supply of water to my surface. After a short time I began to feel better, and soon got all right
d what to do; but here the noble, generous spirit of the 5th Maine showed itself. They showed us how to get rid of them, or at least to prevent their accumulation and increase. The 5th Maine men were true and loyal, in every way, a credit to themselves and an honor to the brigade. All honor to such a brave regiment, and we feel proud and glad of our association with them. A similar attachment developed in the Shenandoah Valley between the Sixth Corps and the Cavalry Corps which led Sheridan to ask for the Sixth Corps in beginning his operations in the final campaign against the defenses of Petersburgh. In the advance of the army, to oppose Lee's invasion of Maryland, Col. Beckwith gives a vivid and somewhat amusing description of a physical prostration that he suffered. It may remind others of a similar experience, perhaps not with the same outcome. The day we marched around Sugar Loaf Mountain we were the last division of our corps. The day was hot. Wherever the road
Joseph J. Bartlett (search for this): chapter 4
ton. When on the march to cross the Potomac, it was met by General Slocum, who was a friend of Col. Franchot, and by his influence the regiment was reassigned to the Sixth Corps. It was by this unexpected meeting of two old friends that in going to the front the 121st was put into one of the choicest brigades of the army; and we were marched out by way of the Tenallyville road, to, and through Rockville, and by Darnstown and Sugar Loaf Mountain, and joined the brigade commanded by Gen. Joseph J. Bartlett, with which we remained till the war ended. (B.) By all accounts this march to the front was unnecessarily severe. On the first day it was continued until late in the evening, and the men were too weary even to eat, and as they had left their knapsacks behind and had not yet been supplied with shelter tents, the night was spent most miserably, and in many cases the health of the men was so shattered that they never recovered from the effects of their excessive fatigue and expos
Richard Franchot (search for this): chapter 4
ly assigned to organizations already in the field. The 121st was ordered to report to the Fifth Corps, then located in Virginia, south of Washington. When on the march to cross the Potomac, it was met by General Slocum, who was a friend of Col. Franchot, and by his influence the regiment was reassigned to the Sixth Corps. It was by this unexpected meeting of two old friends that in going to the front the 121st was put into one of the choicest brigades of the army; and we were marched out byve fatigue and exposure. Many subsequent marches were longer and more difficult, but they were made under experienced commanders, with the men more inured to exercise, and with facilities to better take care of themselves. The ambition of Col. Franchot to report at the front as soon as possible, led him to resume the march at 2 A. M. the next morning, thus giving the men only three hours for rest and sleep. Many who had not been able to keep up on the previous day, were deprived of even th
H. W. Slocum (search for this): chapter 4
he vicinity of Frederick City. It was necessary to interpose a sufficient force between the advancing enemy and Washington to prevent its capture, and defeat the enemy. In this effort, little time was given to the newly enlisted regiments for instruction and drill. They were hurriedly assigned to organizations already in the field. The 121st was ordered to report to the Fifth Corps, then located in Virginia, south of Washington. When on the march to cross the Potomac, it was met by General Slocum, who was a friend of Col. Franchot, and by his influence the regiment was reassigned to the Sixth Corps. It was by this unexpected meeting of two old friends that in going to the front the 121st was put into one of the choicest brigades of the army; and we were marched out by way of the Tenallyville road, to, and through Rockville, and by Darnstown and Sugar Loaf Mountain, and joined the brigade commanded by Gen. Joseph J. Bartlett, with which we remained till the war ended. (B.) By
n rolled up in our overcoats and rubber blankets, with our knapsacks for a pillow, we could get a good night's rest. Two days out from Camp Lincoln, the regiment overtook the corps and took its place in the Second Brigade. According to Col. Beckwith the reception it received was not altogether pleasant. He says, Another source of annoyance and hardship was the constant shouting and ridicule we received from the old regiments. We were called Paid Hirelings, Two Hundred Dollar Men, Sons of Mars; told we would get soft bread farther on if we did not like hardtack; asked if we liked army life, and a lot of stuff too foolish to speak of; but to us it was excessively annoying. Our men were an extraordinary body of troops and felt keenly this ridicule, but they bore it patiently, except now and then some hot blood would hit out and resent the insult. Such outbreaks were quickly quieted. Soon, however, a sincere friendship sprang up between the 121st and the 5th Maine, which deepened
1 2 3 4