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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
uld on the other, came out of the Custom House door on Bank square. They were greeted with a sound which was not a cheer or a hurrah, but that fierce yell which was first heard at Manassas, and had been the note of victors at Cold Harbor, at Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and wherever battle was fiercest. The trio got into an open carriage and drove to the Spotswood Hotel, at the corner of Main and Eighth streets. As they moved amidst the rejoicing crowd, the rebel yell was their only applaund with the Johnstons, with Stuart and Forrest and Kirby Smith, and Taylor and many another, to fight such battles as the two at Manassas, the seven at Richmond, the two at Fredericksburg, and the bloody fields of Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. Great publicists like Chase and O'Conor and Evarts knew that the law and the custom of nations did not look upon such deeds as those of a traitor, and that the world stood agast at the effort to thus debase the principle
Irwinville, Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
a. (104 War of the Rebellion, 683 ) This reward was subsequently increased to $25,000. A very moderate sum for so gallant a gentleman. General Wilson also wrote General Steedman: Everything is on the lookout for J. D. His cavalry is dissolved, and he is a fugitive, but in what direction is not known. (104 War of the Rebellion, p. 666.) On the 11th of May, 1865, Lieut.-Colonel B. D. Pritchard, commanding the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, reported that at daylight on the 10th, at Irwinville, Ga., about seventy-five miles from Macon, he had captured Mr. Davis with his family, his wife's sister and brother, Mr. Reagan, his Postmaster-General, Mr. Burton N. Harrison, his private secretary, Colonel William Preston Johnston, and Colonel Lubbock, of his staff, and Lieutenant Hathaway; together with five wagons and three ambulances. Colonel Pritchard merely announced the fact, and though he had a whole day to hear the gossip of the memorable occasion, he made no reference to the fals
Yonkers (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
oney from the government. The investigation proved, and the report states, that— Sanford Conover—his true name is Dunham; lawyer by profession, formerly lived at Croton, then in New York and Brooklyn; a very shrewd, bad, and dangerous man. William Campbell—his true name is Joseph A. Hoare, a gas-fixer by trade; born in the State of New York, and never south of Washington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Lo
Kosciusko, Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
he rebels acquire the power of establiahing an independent state, which all men regard as not only legitimate, but honorable in its origin; if they fail, the victor may be as indulgent as he will, or, as far as he dare, may consecrate to his revenge the field of his ruin. Whatever severity can be justified at the bar of public opinion may be practiced; and certainly no more should be exercised. To the latter proposition every magnanimous spirit will assent. Washington might have failed; Kosciusko did fail. After an open territorial war of this kind had existed for four years, it might be thought by some that the rebels were still simply criminal violators of the municipal law, and that they ought to be dealt with as such. By way of reasoning, it might be urged that the extent of their operations merely intensified their guilt, and should not in any way affect the question. But this reasoning, if such it may be called, proves too much. On the fall of the rebellious state, a
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
derwood, of the United States District Court for the District of Virginia, and to ask an interview in regard to the trial of Mr. Davis for treason. It was arranged that he should be indicted at the May term (1865) of the United States Court at Norfolk, over which Underwood was to preside. This was to be done, despite the fact that the judge had previously been of the opinion that the rebellion had become a civil war of proportions too great to make it proper or expedient to indict its leadere happy faculty that a strong mind has over a weaker to mould it to agree with its views and opinions. Surgeon Cooper's wife is a secessionist and one of the F. F. V.'s of this State. He is exceedingly attentive to Mrs. Davis, escorting her to Norfolk and back, and yesterday he had a private interview with Davis and Messrs. O'Conor and Shea. To-day the four were together at the Doctor's house. I believe more might have been said in this report. In my opinion there are other reason than th
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
nd he reported to General Halleck for the purpose. (121 War of Rebellion, p. 560.) On the 19th of May the steamer Clyde reached Fortress Monroe, having aboard Mr. Davis and family, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Reagan, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Clay, Major-General Joseph Wheeler and staff, Colonels Johnston and Lubbock, and Mr. Burton N. Harrison, besides one or two subaltern officers. The safeguards were at once augmented by placing a gunboat on each side of the Clyde. Stephens and Reagan were sent to Fort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, while the women and children were sent back South. Fearing that Halleck might not be harsh enough or Miles sharp enough for the occasion, Mr. Stanton sent the Assistant Secretary of War, Mr. C. A. Dana, to the fort to supervise the details of the incarceration of the two prisoners, Davis and Clay. He was present on the 22d of June, when they were removed, and wrote a graphic account of the proceedi
Harlem River (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
deceiving General Holt and obtaining money from the government. The investigation proved, and the report states, that— Sanford Conover—his true name is Dunham; lawyer by profession, formerly lived at Croton, then in New York and Brooklyn; a very shrewd, bad, and dangerous man. William Campbell—his true name is Joseph A. Hoare, a gas-fixer by trade; born in the State of New York, and never south of Washington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ote General Upton: The President of the United States has issued his proclamation announcing tharitchard. The steamer was convoyed by the United States steam sloop of war Tuscarora. The Secrf New York, to see Judge Underwood, of the United States District Court for the District of Virgin be indicted at the May term (1865) of the United States Court at Norfolk, over which Underwood wasavis was found in the Circuit Court of the United States for the District of Virginia. on the 8th ct providing that the Circuit Court of the United States should be held at Richmond on the first Mod any office, civil or military, under the United States; or under any State, who, having previouslen moved for a rule on the Attorney of the United States to show cause why the indictment should no the position. The Chief-Justice of the United States presided, and it is with pleasure that it ill not prosecute further on behalf of the United States, against the above-named parties upon sepa[10 more...]
Cold Spring, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
hington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to my mind) that the depositions made by Campbell, Snevel, Wright, Pa
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
f May, 1866, passed an act providing that the Circuit Court of the United States should be held at Richmond on the first Monday in May and the fourth Monday in November in each year. This, the Attorney-General held, abrogated the special term fixed for October. But on the 23d of July Congress passed an act to fix the number of judges of the Supreme Court and to change certain judicial circuits. Among those changed was that assigned to the Chief Justice, when Delaware was taken out and South Carolina substituted. This change, it was thought, would make a new allotment necessary, and as this could only be made by the Supreme Court, and not by it until it met, it was probable that the court in Richmond could not convene even in November; during all of which time and through all these contingencies Mr. Davis was to remain in a military jail. Thus it appears that, despite the expressions of a desire to see justice done the prisoner, made by the only men who had the power to do justic
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