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Southwest (Indiana, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
e 16, et seq., give their exact condition and strength. The Department of the Arkansas was then subject to my commnand, but General Fred Steele, its commander, was at Little Rock, remote from me, acting in cooperation with General Banks, and had full employment for every soldier of his command; so that I never depended on him for any men, or for any participation in the Georgia campaign. Soon after, viz., May 8th, that department was transferred to the Military Division of the Gulf, or Southwest, Major-General E. R. S. Canby commanding, and General Steele served with him in the subsequent movement against Mobile. In Generals Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, I had three generals of education and experience, admirably qualified for the work before us. Each has made a history of his own, and I need not here dwell on their respective merits as men, or as commanders of armies, except that each possessed special qualities of mind and of character which fitted them in the highest deg
Athens (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
by detachments of its own, its rear communications. At the signal to be given by you, Schofield, leaving a select garrison at Knoxville and Loudon, with twelve thousand men will drop down to the Hiawassee, and march against Johnston's right by the old Federal road. Stoneman, now in Kentucky, organizing the cavalry forces of the Army of the Ohio, will operate with Schofield on his left front — it may be, pushing a select body of about two thousand cavalry by Ducktown or Elijah toward Athens, Georgia. Thomas will aim to have forty-five thousand men of all arms, and move straight against Johnston, wherever he may be, fighting him cautiously, persistently, and to the best advantage. He will have two divisions of cavalry, to take advantage of any offering. McPherson will have nine divisions of the Army of the Tennessee, if A. J. Smith gets here, in which case he will have full thirty thousand of the best men in America. He will cross the Tennessee at Decatur and Whitesburg, mar
Gaylesville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
nd Lieutenant-Colonel Willard Warner, inspector-general. These officers constituted my staff proper at the beginning of the campaign, which remained substantially the same till the close of the war, with very few exceptions; viz.: Surgeon John Moore, United States Army, relieved Surgeon Kittoe of the volunteers (about Atlanta) as medical director; Major Henry Hitchcock joined as judge-advocate, and Captain G. Ward Nichols reported as an extra aide-de-camp (after the fall of Atlanta) at Gaylesville, just before we started for Savannah. During the whole month of April the preparations for active war were going on with extreme vigor, and my letter-book shows an active correspondence with Generals Grant, Halleck, Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield on thousands of matters of detail and arrangement, most of which are embraced in my testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. i., Appendix. When the time for action approached, viz., May 1, 1861, the actual armies pr
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
tal3538191,172 Grand aggregate1,8637,4369,299 General Joseph E. Johnston, in his Narrative of his military operations, just published (March 27, 1874), gives the effective strength of his army at and about Dalton on the 1st of May, 1864 (page 302), as follows: Infantry37,652 Artillery2,812 Cavalry2,392   Total42,856 During May, and prior to reaching Cassville, he was further reenforced (page 352): Polk's corps of three divisions12,000 Martin's division of cavalry3,500 Jackson's division of cavalry3,900 And at New Iope Church, May 26th: Brigade of Quarles2,200     Grand total64,456 His losses during the month of May are stated by him, as taken from the report of Surgeon Foard (page 325): from Dalton to Cassville. Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total. Hardee's116850966 Hood's2831,5641,847 Polk's46529575 Total4452,9433,388 at New Hope Church (Page 335.) Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total. Hardee's1568791,035 Hood's103756859 Polk's1794111 Total27
Washington (United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
y--now of the Adjutant-General's Department, but then at Washington in charge of the Provost-Marshal-General's office--a letgreement with General Grant that he would notify me from Washington, I could not with propriety press the matter, but if Genf April, at Nashville, I wrote to General Grant, then at Washington, reporting to him the results of my visit to the severalor-General Frank P. Blair, then a member of Congress, in Washington. On the 2d of April I notified him by letter that I waneral John A. Rawlins, chief of staff to General Grant at Washington, I described at length all the preparations that were inpril I received General Grant's letter of April 4th from Washington, which formed the basis of all the campaigns of the yearidential.] headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., April 4, 1864. Major-General W. T. Sherman, commandi. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, Commander-in-Chief, Washington, D. C. dear General: Your two letters of April 4th are no
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
viz.: Surgeon John Moore, United States Army, relieved Surgeon Kittoe of the volunteers (about Atlanta) as medical director; Major Henry Hitchcock joined as judge-advocate, and Captain G. Ward Nichols reported as an extra aide-de-camp (after the fall of Atlanta) at Gaylesville, just before we started for Savannah. During the whole month of April the preparations for active war were going on manner to keep Lee so busy that he could not respond to any calls of help by Johnston. Neither Atlanta, nor Augusta, nor Savannah, was the objective, but the army of Jos. Johnston, go where it might fall behind the Chattahoochee, I will feign to the right, but pass to the left and act against Atlanta or its eastern communications, according to developed facts. This is about as far ahead as Igreat many roads that led in every direction. Its possession would be a threat to Marietta and Atlanta, but I could not then venture to attempt either, till I had regained the use of the railroad, a
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
scratching the skin, and struck Colonel Taylor square in the breast; luckily he had in his pocket a famous memorandum-book, in which he kept a sort of diary, about which we used to joke him a good deal; its thickness and size saved his life, breaking the force of the ball, so that after traversing the book it only penetrated the breast to the ribs, but it knocked him down and disabled him for the rest of the campaign. He was a most competent and worthy officer, and now lives in poverty in Chicago, sustained in part by his own labor, and in part by a pitiful pension recently granted. On the 1st of June General McPherson closed in upon the right, and, without attempting further to carry the enemy's strong position at New Hope Church, I held our general right in close contact with it, gradually, carefully, and steadily working by the left, until our strong infantry-lines had reached and secured possession of all the wagon-roads between New Hope, Allatoona, and Acworth, when I dispat
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
hofield going back to Knoxville, and McPherson to Huntsville, Thomas remaining at Chattanooga. On the 2d of April, at Nashville, I wrote to General Grant, then at Washington, reporting to him the results of my visit to the several armies, and asked his consent to the several changes proposed, which was promptly given by telegraph. I then addressed myself specially to the troublesome question of transportation and supplies. I found the capacity of the railroads from Nashville forward to Decatur, and to Chattanooga, so small, especially in the number of locomotives and cars, that it was clear that they were barely able to supply the daily wants of the armies then dependent on them, with no power of accumulating a surplus in advance. The cars were daily loaded down with men returning from furlough, with cattle, horses, etc.; and, by reason of the previous desolation of the country between Chattanooga and Knoxville, General Thomas had authorized the issue of provisions to the suffer
Beverly (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
ainst Richmond from the south side of James River. This will give Butler thirty-three thousand men to operate with, W. F. Smith commanding the right wing of his forces, and Gillmore the left wing. I will stay with the Army of the Potomac, increased by Burnside's corps of not less than twenty-five thousand effective men, and operate directly against Lee's army, wherever it may be found. Sigel collects all his available force in two columns, one, under Ord and Averill, to start from Beverly, Virginia, and the other, under Crook, to start from Charleston, on the Kanawha, to move against the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad. Crook will have all cavalry, and will endeavor to get in about Saltville, and move east from there to join Ord. His force will be all cavalry, while Ord will have from ten to twelve thousand men of all arms. You I propose to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of the enemy's country as far as you can, inflicting all the d
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 17
g ordeal by a court of inquiry, touching their conduct of the campaign in Tennessee and Kentucky, that resulted in the battle of Perryville, or Chaplin's Hills, October 8, 1862, and they had been substantially acquitted; and, as it was manifest that we were to have some hard fighting, we were anxious to bring into harmony every man and every officer of skill in the profession of arms. Of these, Generals Buell and McClellan were prominent in rank, and also by reason of their fame acquired in Mexico, as well as in the earlier part of the civil war. After my return to Nashville I addressed myself to the task of organization and preparation, which involved the general security of the vast region of the South which had been already conquered, more especially the several routes of supply and communication with the active armies at the front, and to organize a large army to move into Georgia, coincident with the advance of the Eastern armies against Richmond. I soon received from Colonel
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