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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Munchausen (search for this): chapter 6
Hall Friday evening, January 30, 1852. Mr. President: I do not feel disposed to talk about Colonization to-night, and I am glad to think that, after the remarks already submitted to us, it is unnecessary anything more should be said on that topic. I mean, the colonization of black men to Africa. I have been colonized myself from this hall for some time; and m getting here again, I prefer to go back to the old note, and try to get the hang of this school-house. [Laughter.] You know Baron Munchausen says, in one of his marvellous stories, that it was so cold one day in Russia, when he began to play a tune on his trumpet, that half of it froze in the instrument before it could get out; and a few months afterwards, he was startled, in Italy, to hear, of a sudden, the rest of the tune come pealing forth. We were somewhat frozen up a while ago in this hall, with George Thompson on the platform; now we want the rest of the tune. [Laughter and cheers.] The Mail of this morning says
Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 6
Acorn. [Renewed cheering.] [At this point a voice called out, Three cheers for John H. Pearson! after what had been said from the platform, such a call was not likely to be very warmly responded to; but one or two voices were raised, and Mr. Phillips continued.] Yes, it is fitting that the cheer should be a poor one, when, in the presence of that merchant [pointing to the portrait of John Hancock], of that merchant who led the noblest movement for civil liberty ever made on this side thome to Massachusetts, and lobbied so efficiently as to secure the election of Charles Sumner to the Senate of the United States. [Loud cheers.] [A voice: Three cheers for Charles Sumner. Overwhelming applause. Three cheers for Webster. Mr. Phillips continued:--] Faintly given, those last; but I do not much care, Mr. Chairman, which way the balance of cheers goes in respect to the gentleman whose name has just been mentioned [Mr. Webster]. It is said, you know, that when Washington sto
Pertinax McSycophant (search for this): chapter 6
While here he had occasion to mention the name of Daniel Webster, as I have once or twice to-night, and it was received with cheer on cheer, four, five, and six times repeated during the course of his speech. In fact, he could hardly go on for the noisy opposition. That was at a time when some men were crazy enough to think that Daniel would yet be nominated for the Presidency; but those gaudy soap-bubbles have all burst. [ Three cheers for Daniel Webster. ] Yes, three cheers for Sir Pertinax McSycophant, who all his life long has been bowing down to the Slave Power to secure the Presidency; willing to sacrifice his manhood for the promise of a mess of pottage, and destined to be outwitted at last. [Cheers.] Three cheers for the man who, after many great and swelling words against Texas, when finally the question of the Mexican war was before the Senate, did not dare to vote, but dodged the question, afraid to be wholly Southerner or Northerner, and striving in vain to outdo Winthr
s had bowed, not unworthily, for more than thirty years. I came here again last fall,--the first time I had been here, in a Whig meeting, since listening to Otis. I found Rufus Choate on the platform. Compared with the calm grace and dignity of Otis, the thought of which came rushing back, he struck me like a monkey in convulsions. [Roars of laughter and cheers.] Alas! I said, if the party which has owned Massachusetts so long, which spoke to me, as a boy, through the lips of Quincy and Sullivan, of Webster and Otis, has sunk down to the miserable sophistry of this mountebank!--and I felt proud of the city of my birth, as I looked over the murmuring multitude beneath me, on whom his spasmodic chatter fell like a wet blanket. [Great laughter and cheering.] He did not dare to touch a second time on the Fugitive Slave Bill. He tried it once, with his doctrine of infamous ethics, and the men were as silent as the pillars around them. Ah, thought I, we have been here a little too oft
Hugh Peters (search for this): chapter 6
if the answer to the old Puritan catechism, , What is the chief end of man? is to be changed, as, according to modern state craft it ought to be, why, be it so. Nicholas of Russia made a catechism for the Poles, in which they are taught that Christ is next below God, and the Emperor of all the Russias is next below Christ. So, judging by the tenor of his recent speeches, Daniel has got a new catechism, What is the chief end of man? The old one of the Westminster divines, of Selden and Hugh Peters, of Cotton and the Mathers, used to answer, To glorify God and enjoy him forever ; that is Kane-treason, now. The chief end of man ?--why, it is to save the Union! A voice.-Three cheers for the Union! Mr. Philips.--Feeble cheers those--[Great applause]--and a very thankless office it is to defend the Union on that day. Did you ever read the fable of the wolf and the house-dog? The one was fat, the other gaunt and famine-struck. The wolf said to the dog, You are very fat. Yes, rep
human skill; if the answer to the old Puritan catechism, , What is the chief end of man? is to be changed, as, according to modern state craft it ought to be, why, be it so. Nicholas of Russia made a catechism for the Poles, in which they are taught that Christ is next below God, and the Emperor of all the Russias is next below Christ. So, judging by the tenor of his recent speeches, Daniel has got a new catechism, What is the chief end of man? The old one of the Westminster divines, of Selden and Hugh Peters, of Cotton and the Mathers, used to answer, To glorify God and enjoy him forever ; that is Kane-treason, now. The chief end of man ?--why, it is to save the Union! A voice.-Three cheers for the Union! Mr. Philips.--Feeble cheers those--[Great applause]--and a very thankless office it is to defend the Union on that day. Did you ever read the fable of the wolf and the house-dog? The one was fat, the other gaunt and famine-struck. The wolf said to the dog, You are very f
y, its sanction of the cowardly and lying policy of the police, its servile and volunteer zeal in behalf of the man-hunters, and its deliberate, wanton, and avowed violation of the laws of the Commonwealth, for the basest of all purposes,--slave-trading, selling a free man into bondage, that State Street and Milk Street might make money. Next we come to that man [John P. Bigelow] who stood at yonder door, looking on, while George Thompson was mobbed from this platform; who, neither an honorable Mayor nor a gentleman, broke at once his oath of office and his promise as a gentleman to give us this hall for certain eighty dollars to be paid him, and when he had stood by and seen us mobbed out of it, thought he mended his character by confessing his guilt, in not daring to send in a bill Resolved, That the circumstances of the case will not allow us to believe that this infamous deed was the act of the City Government only; and then, as Boston-born men, some of us, comforting ou
John H. Pearson (search for this): chapter 6
set him. The fault that I rather choose to note is, that the owner of the brig Acorn can walk up State Street, and be as honored a man as he was before; that John H. Pearson walks our streets as erect as ever, and no merchant shrinks from his side. But we will put the fact that he owned that brig, and the infamous uses he made ofc applause.] The time shall come when it will be thought the unkindest thing in the world for any one to remind the son of that man that his father's name was John H. Pearson, and that he owned the Acorn. [Renewed cheering.] [At this point a voice called out, Three cheers for John H. Pearson! after what had been said from the John H. Pearson! after what had been said from the platform, such a call was not likely to be very warmly responded to; but one or two voices were raised, and Mr. Phillips continued.] Yes, it is fitting that the cheer should be a poor one, when, in the presence of that merchant [pointing to the portrait of John Hancock], of that merchant who led the noblest movement for civil l
Franklin Haven (search for this): chapter 6
ws, and men of our country. It is thought that, as little men, we are bound to tune our voices and bow our heads to the great intellects, as they are called, of the land,--Mr. Webster and others. He tells us, that there are certain important interests concerned in this question, which we are bound to regard, and not abstract theories about the equality of men, and the freedom of humble individuals. Well, all I say to that is, when dollars are to be discussed, let him discuss them with Franklin Haven, in the directors' room of the Merchants' Bank. Let him discuss them over the bursting ledgers of Milk Street,--that is the place for dollar talks. But there is no room for dollars in Faneuil Hall. The idea of liberty is the great fundamental principle of this spot,--that a man is worth more than a bank-vault. [Loud cheers.] I know Mr. Webster has, on various occasions, intimated that this is not statesmanship in the United States; that the cotton-mills of Lowell, the schooners of
Orville Dewey (search for this): chapter 6
my neck. But that's a small matter; they feed me well. On the whole, said the wolf, taking the food and the collar together, I prefer to remain in the woods. Now, if I am allowed to choose, I do not like the collar of Daniel Webster and Parson Dewey, and there are certain ugly scars I see about their necks. I should not like, Dr. Dewey, to promise to return my mother to slavery; and, Mr. Webster, I prefer to be lean and keep my prejudices, to getting fat by smothering them. I do not like yDr. Dewey, to promise to return my mother to slavery; and, Mr. Webster, I prefer to be lean and keep my prejudices, to getting fat by smothering them. I do not like your idea of the Yankee character, which seems to be too near that of the Scotchman, of whom Dr. Johnson said, that, if he saw a dollar on the other side of hell, he would make a spring for it at the risk of falling in. [Laughter.] Under correction of these great statesmen and divines, I cannot think this the beau ideal of human perfection. I do not care whether the schooners of Harwich, under slaveholding bunting, catch fish and keep them or not; I do not care whether the mills of Abbott Lawr
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