hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Hardeman Stuart 412 0 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 370 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 293 3 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 279 23 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 172 0 Browse Search
Jeb Stuart 154 4 Browse Search
Jack Mosby 150 0 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 124 0 Browse Search
Beauregard 110 16 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. Search the whole document.

Found 182 total hits in 38 results.

1 2 3 4
ght five or six thousand dollars in Confederate money. As we came up-Captains Robert Lee, Philip Dandridge, and myself-this gentleman complained in animated termose days the besetting sin of every true cavalry-man! Ii. At nightfall General Lee retired from Cattail Creek toward Dinwiddie Court-House, the enemy having ren road to reach Petersburg that night. I determined to try, and so informed General Lee, who thereupon requested me to carry a dispatch which he had just written, tn, and I replied: Well, I don't believe you are a Yankee; I belong to General Lee's army. All right; so do we, was the answer. You can come over at the fGordon's extreme right. Not finding General Gordon, I had been requested by General Lee to communicate with Pegram. His headquarters were near the junction of t when I met him, in February, 1865, he was commanding the advance brigade of General Lee's right wing, and had held his ground all day against the severest assaults
Philip Dandridge (search for this): chapter 5.47
uct, the General had mounted a more manageable courser. Whilst the General was narrating these particulars, two young officers of his staff, Captains Lee and Dandridge, came in, after a hot chase. The former had been entirely surrounded, but kept the woods, taking advantage of every opening; and finally perceiving an interval orm and equipments of the men-very unlike Federals. Their coats were of navy blue, of unfamiliar cut; and they had cutlasses apparently in their belts. Captain Dandridge had gazed at this party with astonishment for some moments, when all at once he was perceived, and an officer, apparently, beckoned to him. To go or not to gxcellent new hat; and rode a superb horse, which would have brought five or six thousand dollars in Confederate money. As we came up-Captains Robert Lee, Philip Dandridge, and myself-this gentleman complained in animated terms of the immorality involved in capturing a non-combatant; he was not a soldier, only the correspondent
orce had steadily pressed on, the Confederates retiring; was now at Kirby's, and soon would be at Dinwiddie Court-House. This was not eminently agreeable to myself personally. Kirby's was on the only road to Petersburg, except by way of Malone's — for the time rendered impracticable-and to reach my journey's end it seemed necessary to make the circuit by Dinwiddie Court-House. To attempt the road by Kirby's was certain capture; and in an undoubted bad humour the solitary horseman, as Mr. James would say, turned to the left, crossed Stony Creek, struck into the Flat foot road, and in due time drew near Roney's bridge, on the upper waters of the stream, near Dinwiddie. Within a quarter of a mile of the stream a soldier made his appearance, coming to meet me, and this individual informed me with the politest possible salute that I had better look out, as the Yankees were at the bridge. At the bridge! Where? At Roney's bridge, just in front, sir. This was the unkindest cu
John Gilpin (search for this): chapter 5.47
Three or four Federal cavalry-men had been left behind by their comrades on the retreat, and had stopped at the house to ask the way to their lines. While thus employed, the prisoner and his escort came by; the Federal cavalry-men rushed forth to the rescue put their pistols on the unsuspecting escort, and now both rescuers and rescued were safe within their own lines! The whole affair was truly laughable, and the gallant correspondent deserved his good fortune, since he made a true John Gilpin run for liberty. I did not grudge him the enjoyment thereof at all, but must confess to a keen feeling of regret at the loss of his horse. He appeared to be an excellentanimal; and to covet your neighbour's horse, if he chanced to be desirable, was in those days the besetting sin of every true cavalry-man! Ii. At nightfall General Lee retired from Cattail Creek toward Dinwiddie Court-House, the enemy having returned within their lines; and I determined to continue my way to Peters
by General Lee to communicate with Pegram. His headquarters were near the junction of the Boydton and Quaker roads; and having turned over the cavalry detachment to Colonel Phillips, I entered the old wooden building and found General John Pegram. This gallant young officer had been my school-fellow and intimate friend in boyhood; and I had seen him every day almost until his departure for West Point. After graduating there he had entered the cavalry, served on the prairies, and in 1861 returned to offer his sword to Virginia, where he was received in a manner highly flattering, and placed in command of the forces near Rich Mountain. The unfortunate result of that campaign is known, and the proud and sensitive spirit of the young soldier was deeply wounded. In spite of the assurances of brave and skilful soldiers that the issue there was unavoidable, considering the great force brought against him, he persisted in brooding over it. It would always be known as Pegram's surr
General Pegram on the night before his death. I. The writer's object in the present paper is to chronicle the events of a day in the pine-woods of Dinwiddie in 1865, and to mention a circumstance which impressed him forcibly at the time; nearly convincing him of the truth of presentiments, and warnings of approaching death. It was early in February of the year 1865, and General Grant had for some time been straining every nerve to force his way to the Southside railroad-when General Lee would be cut off from his base of supplies, and compelled to retreat or surrender his army. Grant had exhibited a persistence which amounted to genius; and the Federal lines had been pushed from the Jerusalem to the Weldon road, from the Weldon to the Vaughan and Squirrel Level roads, and thence still westward beyond Hatcher's Run, toward the White Oak road, running through the now well-known locality of Five Forks. On the western bank of the run, near Burgess's Mill, General Lee's extrem
General Pegram on the night before his death. I. The writer's object in the present paper is to chronicle the events of a day in the pine-woods of Dinwiddie in 1865, and to mention a circumstance which impressed him forcibly at the time; nearly convincing him of the truth of presentiments, and warnings of approaching death. It was early in February of the year 1865, and General Grant had for some time been straining every nerve to force his way to the Southside railroad-when General1865, and General Grant had for some time been straining every nerve to force his way to the Southside railroad-when General Lee would be cut off from his base of supplies, and compelled to retreat or surrender his army. Grant had exhibited a persistence which amounted to genius; and the Federal lines had been pushed from the Jerusalem to the Weldon road, from the Weldon to the Vaughan and Squirrel Level roads, and thence still westward beyond Hatcher's Run, toward the White Oak road, running through the now well-known locality of Five Forks. On the western bank of the run, near Burgess's Mill, General Lee's extrem
February, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 5.47
ve spirit of the young soldier was deeply wounded. In spite of the assurances of brave and skilful soldiers that the issue there was unavoidable, considering the great force brought against him, he persisted in brooding over it. It would always be known as Pegram's surrender, he said. It was soon forgotten, however; greater events and greater disasters threw it in the background, and the young soldier fought his way to high repute in the Southern army. On the night when I met him, in February, 1865, he was commanding the advance brigade of General Lee's right wing, and had held his ground all day against the severest assaults of the enemy. The cordial greeting of two friends, after long separation, over, General Pegram mounted his horse to ride with me to General Gordon's, beyond Burgess' mill, and on the way we dropped military affairs entirely, to revert to scenes which had taken place twenty years before, and speak of the old familiar faces and things long previous to the wa
1 2 3 4