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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
cenes some adverse influence which was too powerful to be overcome, which Mr. O'Conor believed emanated from the Secretary of State, W. H. Seward. When Mr. Reverdy Johnson, the senator from Maryland, applied to Seward to help him in the effort to secure bail, Seward pointed to the scar on his neck, made by the knife of the assassin, and said: You can hardly expect me to aid you. On the 10th of May, 1866, the House of Representatives adopted a resolution introduced by Mr. Boutwell, of Massachusetts, instructing the Judiciary Committee to inquire whether there was probable cause for believing in the criminality alleged against Davis and others, and whether any legislation was necessary to bring them to a speedy and impartial trial. To this committee it was that Colonel Turner was assigned as Judge Advocate, and it was due to his intelligent and indefatigable efforts that the frauds which had been practiced upon the Judge Advocate-General in the matter of depositions were discovered
Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
rwood, who was incapable of appreciating the dignity of his official position, said, turning to the United States army officers who were present: The court is honored on this occasion by the presence of so many of the nation's noblest and bravest defenders that the usual morning routine will be omitted. The sentiment, so far as it refers to the military spectators, is unobjectionable, but its utterance on such an occasion has no parallel in judicial conduct since Jeffries held his court at Taunton. General Burton then presented Mr. Davis to the court in obedience to the writ of habeas corpus. In reply, the judge tendered him the thanks of the court for his prompt and graceful obedience to its writ. He has thus added another to the many laurels he has gained upon the battle-fields of the country. Imagine Chief-Justice Marshall, who once presided in the same court in a great trial for treason, effusively tendering his thanks to anyone who obeyed the mandate of his writ. Inter arm
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
world by its sturdy fortitude and by the heroic defense of what it regarded right. The very indictment against Jefferson Davis was the catalogue of the great acts of a sovereign—a sovereign who conspired with Lee, and Jackson, and with the Johnstons, with Stuart and Forrest and Kirby Smith, and Taylor and many another, to fight such battles as the two at Manassas, the seven at Richmond, the two at Fredericksburg, and the bloody fields of Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. Great publicists like Chase and O'Conor and Evarts knew that the law and the custom of nations did not look upon such deeds as those of a traitor, and that the world stood agast at the effort to thus debase the principles of international justice; but President Johnson and Judge Underwood, at a safe distance, would have read the riot act to the rebel army, and then held forfeited to the gallows the life of every gallant man who did not at once lay down his arms. Mr. Davis sat behi
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ed mighty deeds, won brilliant victories, and challenged the admiration of the civilized world by its sturdy fortitude and by the heroic defense of what it regarded right. The very indictment against Jefferson Davis was the catalogue of the great acts of a sovereign—a sovereign who conspired with Lee, and Jackson, and with the Johnstons, with Stuart and Forrest and Kirby Smith, and Taylor and many another, to fight such battles as the two at Manassas, the seven at Richmond, the two at Fredericksburg, and the bloody fields of Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. Great publicists like Chase and O'Conor and Evarts knew that the law and the custom of nations did not look upon such deeds as those of a traitor, and that the world stood agast at the effort to thus debase the principles of international justice; but President Johnson and Judge Underwood, at a safe distance, would have read the riot act to the rebel army, and then held forfeited to the gallows t
Blackwell's Island (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to my mind) that the depositions made by Campbell, Snevel, Wright, Patten, Mrs. Douglass, and others, are false; that they are cunningly devised, diabolical fabrications of Conover, verified by his suborned and perjured accomplices. T
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
Justice was to preside at the trial and that he could not be present until the first Tuesday in October, to which day the cause was adjourned. On the 7th of June, 1866, Messrs. Charles O'Conor, of New York; Mr. Thomas G. Pratt, ex-Governor of Maryland, representing Mr. Davis; and Mr. Speed, the Attorney-General, representing the Government, waited on Chief-Justice Chase at his residence to ascertain whether he would entertain a motion to release Mr. Davis on bail. The Chief-Justice, without made by Mr. O'Conor and others, there was behind the scenes some adverse influence which was too powerful to be overcome, which Mr. O'Conor believed emanated from the Secretary of State, W. H. Seward. When Mr. Reverdy Johnson, the senator from Maryland, applied to Seward to help him in the effort to secure bail, Seward pointed to the scar on his neck, made by the knife of the assassin, and said: You can hardly expect me to aid you. On the 10th of May, 1866, the House of Representatives adop
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
Davis was sent to Savannah. Thence he was carried to Fortress Monroe in the steamer Clyde, under a heavy guard, commanded brious. Mr. Secretary Stanton ordered the casemates at Fortress Monroe to be prepared under the special direction of Major-Ge that it would be well to send a special commander for Fortress Monroe, adding, the present one is a faithful officer, but no 560.) On the 19th of May the steamer Clyde reached Fortress Monroe, having aboard Mr. Davis and family, Mr. Stephens, Mr. great. He asked that light be given him, thus: Fortress Monroe, Va., June 6, 1865. General Townsend: General,—Shall er, Mr. Davis could stand it in Richmond as well as at Fortress Monroe, and his counsel would all willingly serve him under a The young Major-General who acted as jailor at Fortress Monroe is pehaps the most notable of the exceptions which prove tte (221 War of the Rebellion, 919): Confidential. Fort Monroe, Va., May 28, 1866. General E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adju
Long Island City (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to my mind) that the depositions made by Campbell, Snevel, Wright, Patten, Mrs. Dougl
Billy Smith (search for this): chapter 1.7
ssination of Mr. Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He, therefore, offers for the arrest of Davis, Clay, and Thompson $100,000 each; for Sanders and Tucker, $25,000 each; and for Cleary, $10,000. Publish this in hand-bills, circulate everywhere, and urge the greatest possible activity in the pursuit. (104 War of Rebellion, 665.) On the next day the same headquarters informs General McCook of these rewards—adding that a reward of $10,000 was also offered for Extra Billy Smith, Rebel Governor of Virginia. (104 War of the Rebellion, 683 ) This reward was subsequently increased to $25,000. A very moderate sum for so gallant a gentleman. General Wilson also wrote General Steedman: Everything is on the lookout for J. D. His cavalry is dissolved, and he is a fugitive, but in what direction is not known. (104 War of the Rebellion, p. 666.) On the 11th of May, 1865, Lieut.-Colonel B. D. Pritchard, commanding the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, reported that at <
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1.7
er, and W. C. Cleary, incited and concerted the assassination of Mr. Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He, therefore, , Mr. Clay and others were implicated in the assassination of President Lincoln, and, in this belief, possibly some of those participating in and indignation, which naturally resulted from the great crime of Lincoln's death, even more disastrous to the South than to the North, a swade against Mr. Davis and Mr. Clay of complicity in the crime of Mr. Lincoln's assassination. It may, with proprietry, be said that though tharges as to the complicity of Davis and others in the murder of Mr. Lincoln, and, fortunately for the cause of truth, Colonel L. C. Turner, learing Mr. Davis from the charge of complicity in the murder of Mr. Lincoln, but at the same time whitewashing Holt, who had been bitterly aby the natural grief and indignation aroused by the murder of President Lincoln, made the treatment of Mr. Davis as a prisoner more rigorous
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