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T. W. Seward (search for this): article 8
from. It shows the earnestness of the masses and their determination to maintain our Government, that will be well for our officials carefully to consider and be ware how they trifle with. The Phraseology of Earl Russell. [From the Philadelphia Inquirer, Aug. 30th.] It becomes us in our present position to watch with special vigilance all the signs of the times.--It is well that we should not be found unprepared for any emergency that may arise. In the letter of Earl Russell to Mr. Seward, which we published yesterday, he so far departs from the ordinary language of diplomacy as to call the United States Government "the Government of President Lincoln." It would have made the rebels look like rebels had he said, "nine States and several millions of inhabitants of the great American Union had seceded and made war on the Government of the United States." He, therefore, by a waiving of the ordinary observances of diplomatic courtesy, calls it "the Government of President Lin
George B. McClellan (search for this): article 8
ate baggage, but also certain valuable papers relating to the conduct of the campaign, the New York Evening Post remarks as follows: The raid on Catlett's in the rear of Gen. Pope's army, like that of Gen Stuart around the entire rear of Gen. McClellan's position on the Chickahominy, shows that with audacity and enterprise an active enemy may easily put us to blush, and cause our commanders bitter mortification, if not serious loss. If we make light of the reported loss of Gen. Pope's papesaster and shame lurk in the rear." In the case of an enemy who is erratic and enterprising in his movements, it will be necessary for Gen. Pope to "look behind" as well as "before." Fortunately for him, and fortunately for the country, Gen. McClellan, with his veteran troops, is in a position to guard the army of Gen. Pope and the capital of the nation from the "disaster and shame" that "lurk in the rear." The free will Offering of the American people. [From the New York Herald, Augu
or by the presence of superior forces of the enemy. The Union General Morgan, in command at Cumberland Gap, was even in a mere hopeless predcutting off supplies and preventing reinforcements from reaching Gen. Morgan, who has 10,000 men in possession of Cumberland Gap, while a larof rebels have surrounded the other side of the Gap to contend with Morgan for its possession. They do not dare come round into Kentucky, for capture would be inevitable. If with a large army they can defeat Morgan and capture his stores, arms, and men, they achieve an immense victh of the Gap, but he has not yet cut off the supplies from reaching Morgan, although the trains are threatened with capture, and recently he ang the present week; but we firmly believe that Generals Nelson and Morgan will be fully equal to this or any similar emergency. The receeous. The news by mail from the Southwest is more cheering. Gen. Morgan is nearly surrounded with rebels at Cumberland Gap, but thinks b
or something else designed to recognize, in language at least, is not officially and authoritatively, the separate sovereignty of the rebels. It should put us on our guard so far as to make ready for whatever may be marked out in the programme of foreign power. As to the real feeling of the British public, the tone of their press and of their people, as reported by travelers in that country, leave us no room to doubt what it is and to what it points. The Rev. Dr. Turnbull, of Hartford, Conn, in a letter to the Christian Reflector, Boston, under date of July 28, thus writes from Edinburg, "The people here and in England, I find, are in singular sympathy with the Southern rebels. They seem to have no just conception of the great principles involved in the American war; and as the United States, at this moment, are suffering from partial defeat before Richmond, it is rather trying to be away from home and hear the ungenerous talk going on here, in all public places. Cotton has bl
Gen Rucil (search for this): article 8
ing of their desires and their fears. When the truth, about European intervention comes to be known, we shall be surprised if the failure to execute the purpose to intervene was not caused by the firm and unqualified friendship of Russia for the United States. Miscellaneous. The news by mail from the Southwest is more cheering. Gen. Morgan is nearly surrounded with rebels at Cumberland Gap, but thinks be can hold his position against an attack of 50,000 men. At last accounts Gen Rucil was operating successfully in Northwestern Alabama. The banks and insurance companies of St. Louis have subscribed $24,350 for volunteers enlisting for the war and their families. The total subscriptions reach near $200,000. It is determined that Missouri shall remain in the Union. Illinois has raised 50,000 out of her quotes of 52,000 for the two calls, consequently, there will be no draft there, as the other 2,000 will not be long wanting. The total appropriations made by
itable. If with a large army they can defeat Morgan and capture his stores, arms, and men, they achieve an immense victory. They then could hold the Gap against Buell, and their forces could advance and retreat at pleasure, in perfect security, and invade Kentucky, holding the Gap as a rendezvous for their Western forces. Scott is still north of the Gap, but he has not yet cut off the supplies from reaching Morgan, although the trains are threatened with capture, and recently he attacked Metcalfe's cavalry, near Richmond, and caused him to retreat. Gen. Nelson is in command of the Federal forces, and, it is understood, will at once put them into a camp of instruction, near Richmond, to thoroughly fit them for the field. We may confidently expect startling news from the Gap during the present week; but we firmly believe that Generals Nelson and Morgan will be fully equal to this or any similar emergency. The recent Raids of the enemy. [From the National Intelligencer.]
is not another town in the State called upon to raise 100 men, while seven plantations are ordered to produce one man each, and probably fifty are only assessed for five or a less number. About 250 towns are deficient, a few each of the full number under the call for three years men; and the number wanted from each town is published, but it is added that many places not enumerated in the list have raised more than their proportion, which will probably affect the deficiency. The time for making the draft in Maine has been postponed in Wednesday, Sept. 10. The new census of San Francisco shows the prosperous condition of that city. In 1860 the population numbered 56,805, in 1861, $3,000, and at present it amounts to 90,000. An indignation meeting was held at Wilmington Del., which denounced Gov. Button, of that State as a traitor and the tool of Senator Simsbury. A committee was appointed to place the proceedings of the meeting before the President and Secretary of War.
is not another town in the State called upon to raise 100 men, while seven plantations are ordered to produce one man each, and probably fifty are only assessed for five or a less number. About 250 towns are deficient, a few each of the full number under the call for three years men; and the number wanted from each town is published, but it is added that many places not enumerated in the list have raised more than their proportion, which will probably affect the deficiency. The time for making the draft in Maine has been postponed in Wednesday, Sept. 10. The new census of San Francisco shows the prosperous condition of that city. In 1860 the population numbered 56,805, in 1861, $3,000, and at present it amounts to 90,000. An indignation meeting was held at Wilmington Del., which denounced Gov. Button, of that State as a traitor and the tool of Senator Simsbury. A committee was appointed to place the proceedings of the meeting before the President and Secretary of War.
July 14th (search for this): article 8
of supplies" for his army, suggests that the impunity with which these petty, but annoying, movements are accomplished is emboldening the insurgents to reduce them to a system. We fear that the Confederate Generals have been encouraged to make these demonstrations on the "line of Gen. Pope's retreat" because they were aware that it does not enter into that officer's view of strategy to give any attention to the state of a fairs behind him. In his address to his soldiers, under date of last July 14th, it will be remembered that he announced as his governing principle "to study the probable lines of retreat of our opponents, and to leave our own to take care of themselves." To this effect he ordered as follows: "I desire you to dismiss from your mind certain phrases which I am sorry to find much in vogue amongst you. I hear constantly of taking 'strong positions and holding them, of lines of retreat,' and of 'bases of supplies' Let us discard such ideas. The strongest position
is not another town in the State called upon to raise 100 men, while seven plantations are ordered to produce one man each, and probably fifty are only assessed for five or a less number. About 250 towns are deficient, a few each of the full number under the call for three years men; and the number wanted from each town is published, but it is added that many places not enumerated in the list have raised more than their proportion, which will probably affect the deficiency. The time for making the draft in Maine has been postponed in Wednesday, Sept. 10. The new census of San Francisco shows the prosperous condition of that city. In 1860 the population numbered 56,805, in 1861, $3,000, and at present it amounts to 90,000. An indignation meeting was held at Wilmington Del., which denounced Gov. Button, of that State as a traitor and the tool of Senator Simsbury. A committee was appointed to place the proceedings of the meeting before the President and Secretary of War.
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