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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 21
o this line of our defenses. Having no officer that I could place in command of the movement on Bowling Green, I have been compelled to select and appoint General Simon B. Buckner a brigadier-general, subject to your approval, which I hope it may meet. The occupation of Bowling Green is an act of self-defense, rendered necessary by the action of the government of Kentucky, and by the evidences of intended movements of the Federal forces. I would be glad to have the services of G. W. Smith, if it is in the power of your Excellency to assign him to my command. Any orders of your Excellency will be executed promptly, and any suggestions you may make will be received with pleasure. With great respect, your obedient servant, A. S. Johnston, General C. S. A. His Excellency Jefferson Davis. A few days prior to Buckner's movement, General Felix K. Zollicoffer, in accordance with arrangements previously made, advanced to Cumberland Ford with about four thousand men.
l W. W. MacKALLall was announced as assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. A little later, order no. 2, as follows, was issued: orders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 21
quipments, transportation, organization, and discipline, was still greater. The United States troops opposed to him were over 36,000 strong, while his own available force was less than 20,000 men. General Fremont reports that he had, September 14, 1861, at and near Cairo, 12,831 men, and at Paducah, 7,791 men; together, 20,622 men, under General U. S. Grant. report on the conduct of the War, part III., p. 41. in this estimate he only puts the forces in his Department at 55,000 men. General McClellan, in his report of the army of the Potomac, p. 48, estimates Fremont's forces, from the best information at the War Department, at 80,000 men, or about 45 per cent. More. This rate of increase would give General Grant 30,000 men. General Robert Anderson commanded the Central Department. The fortune of War, which gave General Johnston his former room-mate at West point as his second in command, confronted him thus with his early friend Anderson as his antagonist. Anderson was able to
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 21
alt River, thirty miles from Louisville, in which city the wildest rumors were afloat and his vanguard was hourly expected. His advance was significantly interpreted as an answer to the defiance launched by the Legislature one week before. General Sherman says (vol. i., page 197): This was universally known to be the signal for action. For it we were utterly unprepared, whereas the rebels were fully prepared. General Sidney Johnston immediately crossed into Kentucky, and advanced as friend Anderson as his antagonist. Anderson was able to oppose to Buckner, at the tap of the drum, Rousseau's brigade, 1,200 strong, 1,800 home Guards from Louisville, and several companies led by Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. Johnson, under General W. T. Sherman, at Muldrough's Hill, to whom he also sent, within a week, the Sixth, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Indiana regiments, the Forty-ninth Ohio Regiment, and the Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment (not less than 3,000 men), making over 6,000 e
Lovell H. Rousseau (search for this): chapter 21
mac, p. 48, estimates Fremont's forces, from the best information at the War Department, at 80,000 men, or about 45 per cent. More. This rate of increase would give General Grant 30,000 men. General Robert Anderson commanded the Central Department. The fortune of War, which gave General Johnston his former room-mate at West point as his second in command, confronted him thus with his early friend Anderson as his antagonist. Anderson was able to oppose to Buckner, at the tap of the drum, Rousseau's brigade, 1,200 strong, 1,800 home Guards from Louisville, and several companies led by Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. Johnson, under General W. T. Sherman, at Muldrough's Hill, to whom he also sent, within a week, the Sixth, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Indiana regiments, the Forty-ninth Ohio Regiment, and the Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment (not less than 3,000 men), making over 6,000 effectives in all. history of the army of the Cumberland, vol. I., p. 29. General Thomas had at camp D
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 21
f self-defense, rendered necessary by the action of the government of Kentucky, and by the evidences of intended movements of the Federal forces. I would be glad to have the services of G. W. Smith, if it is in the power of your Excellency to assign him to my command. Any orders of your Excellency will be executed promptly, and any suggestions you may make will be received with pleasure. With great respect, your obedient servant, A. S. Johnston, General C. S. A. His Excellency Jefferson Davis. A few days prior to Buckner's movement, General Felix K. Zollicoffer, in accordance with arrangements previously made, advanced to Cumberland Ford with about four thousand men. In the west, Feliciana, thirty miles east of Columbus, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Hopkinsville, were garrisoned with small bodies of troops; and the territory between Columbus and Bowling Green was occupied by moving detachments, which created a vague apprehension of military force and projected en
Robert Anderson (search for this): chapter 21
partment, at 80,000 men, or about 45 per cent. More. This rate of increase would give General Grant 30,000 men. General Robert Anderson commanded the Central Department. The fortune of War, which gave General Johnston his former room-mate at West point as his second in command, confronted him thus with his early friend Anderson as his antagonist. Anderson was able to oppose to Buckner, at the tap of the drum, Rousseau's brigade, 1,200 strong, 1,800 home Guards from Louisville, and several cAnderson was able to oppose to Buckner, at the tap of the drum, Rousseau's brigade, 1,200 strong, 1,800 home Guards from Louisville, and several companies led by Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. Johnson, under General W. T. Sherman, at Muldrough's Hill, to whom he also sent, within a week, the Sixth, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Indiana regiments, the Forty-ninth Ohio Regiment, and the Twenty-fourt the Confederacy. Van Horne says ( army of the Cumberland, vol. I., page 37): General Thomas suggested to General Anderson the importance of concentrating for an advance to Knoxville, Tennessee, to seize the East Tennessee & Virginia Railr
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 21
wn to the world: now, therefore, I, Albert Sidney Johnston, General and commander of the Western in determining his line of operations, General Johnston had to consider the geography of the thea, but it is always on the assumption that General Johnston had a large and well-appointed force, whi of the opponents. The Federal forces in General Johnston's front were everywhere about double the r 40,000 troops. to oppose this force General Johnston had, available under Polk, 11,000 troops ths, constituted the sole defense. Thus, General Johnston's available force, from the Big Sandy to dopted under the circumstances. among General Johnston's papers are certain memoranda, intended 15th of September, 1861, in orders no. 1, General Johnston assumed command of the department, and Lie personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal stnt Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-Ge[4 more...]
ainst them; and their superiority in arms, equipments, transportation, organization, and discipline, was still greater. The United States troops opposed to him were over 36,000 strong, while his own available force was less than 20,000 men. General Fremont reports that he had, September 14, 1861, at and near Cairo, 12,831 men, and at Paducah, 7,791 men; together, 20,622 men, under General U. S. Grant. report on the conduct of the War, part III., p. 41. in this estimate he only puts the forces in his Department at 55,000 men. General McClellan, in his report of the army of the Potomac, p. 48, estimates Fremont's forces, from the best information at the War Department, at 80,000 men, or about 45 per cent. More. This rate of increase would give General Grant 30,000 men. General Robert Anderson commanded the Central Department. The fortune of War, which gave General Johnston his former room-mate at West point as his second in command, confronted him thus with his early friend Ander
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 21
reminiscences, the defense of Tennessee. General Johnston's resources and theory. letter to Presidn. Federal alarm. Confederate advance. General Johnston's proclamation. considerations determinihis weakness, his memoranda. Federal plans. Johnston's staff. The command intrusted to General General Johnston was imperial in extent, his discretion as to military movements was unlimited, and his poweberland Gap. On the 14th of September General Johnston reached Nashville. He had been looked fon had an assuring and inspiring effect on General Johnston's hopeful temperament. This was the ls designed for the invasion of Tennessee. General Johnston, therefore, determined, while in reality ds of his intended movement were given by General Johnston to the President, the day before it was m commission of brigadier-general; but, at General Johnston's request, he now threw himself into the t of his own honesty or intelligence. General Johnston's instructions to him were as follows: [6 more...]
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