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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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D. Ruggles (search for this): chapter 3
mper and vigorous intellect, she not only taught her pupil the rudiments, but advanced her well in French and other studies, and imbued her especially with a love of the best literature. Henrietta, and her sisters also, received instruction from a private tutor, Mr. Quinan, a scholar versed in the classics and devoted to his occupation. After this, in the hospitable house of her aunt's husband, Colonel Nathaniel Hart, at Spring Hill, in Woodford County, Kentucky, she was well taught by Mr. Ruggles, afterward a United States Senator. As years passed, the kinswomen exchanged the relation of preceptor and pupil for that of dear friends, which was severed only by death. In the customary interchange of hospitalities, Miss Preston was on a visit to these relations when she met Lieutenant Johnston, and the interest that she at once inspired was reciprocated. This mutual attachment was thorough and unbroken; and Lieutenant Johnston, being sent for a great part of the year 1828 on rec
J. H. Johnston (search for this): chapter 3
n, Webster, Benton, Everett, and Scott, Lieutenant Johnston had his first experience of the great wns To cheer our hopes, and sorrows brighten. Johnston's wife of Louisiana! Johnston's wife of Louisever bloomed In Southern sun or gay savanna. Johnston's wife of Louisiana! Johnston's wife of Louisorn suspended. Johnston's wife of Louisiana! Johnston's wife of Louisiana! The hapless bard who sinnd winning address made him always acceptable. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston's indulgent partiality soughtciously in accepting the friendly offer. Senator Johnston and his wife anxiously wished him to accet moved General Scott. The question of Lieutenant Johnston's wisdom in declining General Scott's tprobably preceded them a month or more, as Mrs. Johnston, writing to him at that point on the 26th, promising, town of 5,000 inhabitants. Lieutenant Johnston says, in a letter to his friend Bickley encroaching whites. The remains of Lieutenant Johnston's correspondence, belonging to this per[28 more...]
Nathaniel J. Eaton (search for this): chapter 3
re military post; it was a delightful and elegant home for the gay and gallant young soldiers serving here their apprenticeship in arms. There was at this period of his life no officer more highly regarded in the regiment than the adjutant. Captain Eaton says of him that, while no man was more approachable, no one could remain unimpressed by his dignity; and Colonel Thomas L. Alexander, who joined the regiment in 1830, says that, possessing in an extraordinary degree the confidence, esteem, and admiration of the whole regiment, he was the very beau-ideal of a soldier and an officer. How early he began to exercise that forbearance in judging his fellowmen which afterward became so characteristic, may be seen in a letter to Eaton, written in this period: Our friend and fellow-soldier has destroyed himself. Being entirely unprepared for such an event, you may well judge that we were greatly shocked and grieved on hearing it. Notwithstanding the manner of his death, let us mou
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 3
Scott to him declined. its influence on his career. ordered to Sackett's Harbor. incident in artillery-practice. ordered to Jefferson Barracks. description of the post. expedition against the Winnebagoes. Red Bird. aversion to letter-writing. the angry flute-player. General Atkinson and his wife. Johnston's standing as an officer. a suicide. his charity in judgment. religious belief. St. Louis in old times. Henrietta Preston. her family connections. Governor William Clark. Thomas H. Benton. Miss Preston's education. marriage. Mrs. Johnston's character. Early married life. Little of general interest remains, either in documentary form or in the memories of men, respecting the early years of Albert Sidney Johnston's army-life. He passed the furlough granted after graduation in Kentucky with his father. The following incident of this visit is related in a letter from a friend, some five years General Johnston's junior, and still living in Kentucky, highly resp
e republic, accredited them to the best society everywhere. Lieutenant Johnston, without allowing himself to fall into fashionable dissipation for which he had no taste, did not withdraw himself from the pleasures and amusements of the city, and found in St. Louis attachments which lasted all his life. The Gratiots, the Chouteaus, the Mullanphys, the O'Fallons, the Clarks, the Bentons, and other noted and estimable families, were among his chosen and remembered friends. At a ball at Mr. Chouteau's, Lieutenant Johnston met for the first time Miss Henrietta Preston. She was the eldest child of Major William Preston, a member of the Virginia family of that name, and an officer of Wayne's army, who had resigned, and settled at Louisville, Kentucky. He was remarkable for his extraordinary size and strength, and likewise for his wit. He is yet remembered by old people for these traits. He died, leaving a large family and an embarrassed estate to the care of his widow. Mrs. Carolin
been encamped here since June, but expect to get into quarters before winter sets in. I could say a great deal more, but I am almost converted into bacon, already, by the smoke from a big log-fire before my tent. I am on guard. Yours truly, Johnston. Six companies of the First, six of the Third, and the Sixth Regiment, to which I belong, are stationed here. Plenty of sport. I am in excellent health and fine spirits. Present my respects to Marshall, Taliaferro, R. and J. Taylor, Hannegan, Green, and Beattie. Yours truly, J. Brown, in his History of Illinois (New York, 1844), says: Red Bird died in prison. A part of those arrested were convicted, and a part acquitted. Those convicted were executed on the 26th of December, in the following year (1828). Black Hawk and Kanonekan, or the Youngest of the Thunders, and a son of Red Bird, all of whom had been charged with attacking the boats, were acquitted. Black Hawk was confined for more than a year before he could
Henry Atkinson (search for this): chapter 3
ebagoes. Red Bird. aversion to letter-writing. the angry flute-player. General Atkinson and his wife. Johnston's standing as an officer. a suicide. his charityantry, to take date from July 1, 1826. The Sixth, commanded by brevet Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, was then esteemed the crack regiment; so that at once he proced to negotiate with General Cass, who thereupon turned the matter over to General Atkinson. The expedition left Prairie du Chien on the 29th of August, and returned828 Lieutenant Johnston was selected as adjutant of the regiment by Brevet-General Henry Atkinson, the colonel commanding. Atkinson was an officer of fair military Atkinson was an officer of fair military capacity and experience, of a bright and social temper, and of popular manners. General Scott, in his autobiography, calls him an excellent man and fine soldier; andnd the eldest of a family celebrated for beauty, wit, and charm of manner. Mrs. Atkinson, aided, after the lapse of some years, by her brilliant and beautiful siste
George Hancock (search for this): chapter 3
ime Miss Henrietta Preston. She was the eldest child of Major William Preston, a member of the Virginia family of that name, and an officer of Wayne's army, who had resigned, and settled at Louisville, Kentucky. He was remarkable for his extraordinary size and strength, and likewise for his wit. He is yet remembered by old people for these traits. He died, leaving a large family and an embarrassed estate to the care of his widow. Mrs. Caroline Hancock Preston was the daughter of Colonel George Hancock, of Fincastle, Virginia (an aide to Pulaski, a colonel in the Revolutionary War, and a member of the Fourth Congress), and belonged to a family distinguished for beauty and talents. By her ability in business and indomitable courage, she relieved the estate from its incumbrances, and successfully defended it from all the legal assaults so common in the early history of Kentucky. At the same time she gave her children the best education then to be had. Her best monument is the grate
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 3
f from the source of preferment. His formal orders to proceed to Sackett's Harbor, on Lake Ontario, are dated December 22d; but he had probably preceded them a month or more, as Mrs. Johnston, writing to him at that point on the 26th, says: We are pleased to hear that you like your situation, and are determined to spend your time usefully and agreeably. And adds: I heard General Brown speak of you in high terms to a young military gentleman last night. From a letter of his friend Polk's it appears that his chief employment at the little frontier post was in books ; but what he read and what he did there are things forgotten. But a single incident is preserved of General Johnston's winter at Sackett's Harbor. This he sometimes cited as an illustration of the recklessness of youth. He was engaged with some fellow-officers in artillery-practice on the ice of Lake Ontario, when a wild party of sleighers kept dashing across the line of fire, near the target. Meaning to r
Thomas H. Benton (search for this): chapter 3
igious belief. St. Louis in old times. Henrietta Preston. her family connections. Governor William Clark. Thomas H. Benton. Miss Preston's education. marriage. Mrs. Johnston's character. Early married life. Little of general interest remsits and visitors, all the morning. In this brilliant and polished society, in which moved Clay and Calhoun, Webster, Benton, Everett, and Scott, Lieutenant Johnston had his first experience of the great world; but it made slight impression on a . Preston's youngest sister had married Governor William Clark, of Missouri, and her husband's niece was the wife of Thomas H. Benton. Governor William Clark was one of the foremost men of the West; a younger brother of the great George Rogers Clark,ried her cousin, Mrs. Radford. His descendants and collaterals are prominent citizens of St. Louis and Louisville. Thomas H. Benton belongs to history. Counted among the first, when Jackson, Webster, Calhoun, and Clay were his competitors, his nam
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