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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. Search the whole document.

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Beauregard (search for this): chapter 16
ing a demonstration against Richmond by the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and thus effecting a diversion which would deliver McClellan from his duress. The former was directed to seize Gordonsville, the point at which the Orange and Central Railroads cross each other, and thus to separate Richmond from the interior. General Pope, who was supposed to have distinguished himself at New Madrid, on the Mississippi, was chiefly noted for his claim of ten thousand prisoners captured from General Beauregard in his retreat from Corinth, where the former commanded the advance of the Federalists (a boast which was reduced, by the truthful statement of the Confederate General, to one hundred). He was the most boastful, the most brutal, and the most unlucky of the Federal leaders who had yet appeared in Virginia. In a general order issued to his troops, he ostentatiously announced his purpose, to conduct the war upon new principles. He had heard much, he said, of lines of communication, and
ted them as auguries of a certain victory. General Pope's method of dealing with the people of Virgat any toil for his Redeemer. Learning that Pope was advancing toward the Rapid Ann River in greair occurred ten miles north of Gordonsville. Pope's infantry paused in the county of Culpepper, woad occupied, and a disastrous progress made by Pope before he could be arrested. He therefore deteMills, as though to attack the extreme right of Pope. Tho other divisions crossed at Barnett's Fordegram with such vigor as plainly indicated that Pope had received some fresh supports since the nighwas convinced by this inquiry, that the army of Pope was receiving constant accessions, and that befo the neighborhood of Gordonsville, hoping that Pope's evil star might tempt him to attack his army out solid result, for it arrested the career of Pope until the army of Northern Virginia arrived, an For we have seen that the supports which saved Pope from destruction only arrived at nightfall upon[6 more...]
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 16
is next visit to Richmond, he would impress them upon the Government. He said that it was manifest by every sign, that McClellan's was a thoroughly beaten army, and was no longer capable of anything, until it was reorganized and reinforced. There enemy was allowed full leisure to repair his strength. Now, since it was determined not to attempt the destruction of McClellan where he lay, the Confederate army should at once leave the malarious district, move northward, and carry the horrors oemonstration against Richmond by the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and thus effecting a diversion which would deliver McClellan from his duress. The former was directed to seize Gordonsville, the point at which the Orange and Central Railroads crch the enterprise and sagacity of Jackson were certain to seize. He knew that the army of Lee, still detained to watch McClellan upon the lower James, could not come to his support before that of Pope would be assembled. The mass of the latter wo
on his part, pronounced this the .most successful of his exploits. But he announced it to his superior, General Lee, in these devout and modest terms:-- August 11th, 6. A. M. On the evening of the 9th instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpepper Court House. The enemy, according to statements of prisoners, consisted of Banis's, McDowell's and Sigel's commands. We have over fear hundred prisoners, including Brigadier-General Price. Whilst our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded whilst ably discharging his duty atthe head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about 1500 small arms, and other ordnance stores. Whilst General Jackson was engaged on the 10th, caring for his killed and wounded, he caused careful reconnoissances to b
August 6th (search for this): chapter 16
s fact will appear a singular evidence of the incompetency of the Federal tactics,--that their boastful commander should have accepted defeat with all the advantage of his superior numbers, in an open country, without effecting any more extended development of his lines, or resort to the resources of manoeuvre. General Jackson, on his part, pronounced this the .most successful of his exploits. But he announced it to his superior, General Lee, in these devout and modest terms:-- August 11th, 6. A. M. On the evening of the 9th instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpepper Court House. The enemy, according to statements of prisoners, consisted of Banis's, McDowell's and Sigel's commands. We have over fear hundred prisoners, including Brigadier-General Price. Whilst our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brigadier-General Charles S. Win
ssume command of his army at Manassa's Junction, celebrated the triumphs to be achieved, before they were won, with banners and laurels. The corps returned from Westover to the neigborhood of Richmond, the 10th of July. There they remained until the 17th, preparing for their march; and it was during this respite that General Jackson first made his appearance openly, in the city which he had done so much to deliver. He gives the following account of it in a letter to his wife. Richmond, July 14th. Yesterday I heard Doctor M. D. Hoge preach in his church, and also in the camp of the Stonewall Brigade. It is a great comfort to have the privilege of spending a quiet Sabbath, within the walls of a house dedicated to the service of God. . . . .People are very kind to me. How God, our God, does shower blessings upon me, an unworthy sinner! The manner of his entrance was this. He came tothe church without attendants; and just after the congregation was assembled, they saw an offi
e. The enemy, according to statements of prisoners, consisted of Banis's, McDowell's and Sigel's commands. We have over fear hundred prisoners, including Brigadier-General Price. Whilst our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded whilst ably discharging his duty atthe head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about 1500 small arms, and other ordnance stores. Whilst General Jackson was engaged on the 10th, caring for his killed and wounded, he caused careful reconnoissances to be made under the care of General J. E. B. Stuart, who providentially visited his army on that day, on a tour of inspection. He was convinced by this inquiry, that the army of Pope was receiving constant accessions, and that before he could resume the offensive, it would be swelled to sixty thousand men. The bulk of the forces of M
August 9th (search for this): chapter 16
onception of orders, did not cross the river until the morning of the 91;h. This derangement of the march arrested General Jackson many miles from Culpepper Court House, and he reluctantly postponed his attack to the next day. On the morning of August 9th, having ascertained that A. P. Hill was now within supporting distance, he moved early; and, with his cavalry in front, pressed toward the Court House. About eight miles from that place, the advance reported the enemy's cavalry before them, gurontery, as a victory; under the pretext that General Jackson had after two days retreated and recrossed the Rapid Ann. Had these measures on his part been caused by anything that was done upon the battle-field by the forces engaged against him August 9th, that pretext would have worn the color of a reason. But since his withdrawal was caused by the arrival of fresh troops in great numbers, after the battle was concluded, it might with as much truth be said that any other victory in history was
August 10th (search for this): chapter 16
ouses for shelter, he was informed that they were full of wounded men, when he persistently refused to enter, lest he should be the occasion of robbing some sufferer of his restingplace. Resuming his way, he observed a little grass-plot, and declared that he could go no farther, but must sleep then and there. A cloak was spread for him upon the ground, when he prostrated himself on it upon his breast, and in a moment forgot his toils and fatigues in deep slumber. The morning of the 10th of August, General Jackson withdrew his lines a short distance, and proceeded to bury his dead, and collect from the field the spoils of his victory. These consisted of one piece of artillery and three caissons, three colors, and five thousand three hundred small arms. The loss of the Confederates in this battle was two hundred and twenty-three killed, one thousand and sixty wounded, and thirty-one missing, --making a total of one thousand three hundred and fourteen. General Jackson modestly est
August 7th (search for this): chapter 16
verywhere dominated over the level plains of the Culpepper border. This judgment was afterward confirmed by the high authority of General Lee, who selected that line for defence against Generals Meade and Grant; and, by its strength, baffled every attempt to force it in front. Pope, then, must not be permitted to occupy it; but it suited the temper of General Jackson to prevent it by an aggressive blow, rather than by a dangerous extension of his inadequate force upon it. Hence, on the 7th of August, he gave orders to his three divisions to move toward Culpepper, and to encamp on that night near Orange Court House. It was on this occasion that the striking witness was borne by his African servant, Jim, to his devout habits, which was so currently (and correctly) related. Some gentlemen were inquiring whether he knew when a battle was about to occur. Oh, yes, Sir, he replied: The General is a great man for praying; night and morning-all times. But when I see him get up several
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