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nd to Ewell, Support the attack. The slumbering soldiers sprang from the earth. They were sleeping almost in ranks, and by the time the horses of the officers were saddled, lines of infantry were moving to the anticipated battlefield. It was Stonewall's intention to attack the Federals who were on the Warrenton road moving on his supposed position, but after marching some distance north of the turnpike in the direction of Thoroughfare Gap no enemy was found. McDowell, after sending Rickett't Manassas, the Seven Days Battles around Richmond, and the three days combats on the plains of the second Manassas. Inquisitive crowds hung around the commanding officers. Jackson was especially an object of much interest. The magic name of Stonewall had been heard at the hearthstones of the people, and they wanted to see him. He was described by one of them as wearing a coarse homespun, over which flapped an old soft hat that any Northern beggar would have considered an insult to have offe
drive him from Maryland Heights, and thus relieve the garrison at Harper's Ferry. Stuart, who had occupied Turner's Gap with Hampton's brigade of cavalrythis gallant officer having rejoined his army-moved to Crampton's Gap, five miles south of Turner's, to reenforce his cavalry under Munford there, thinking, as General Lee did, that should have been the object of McClellan's main attack, as it was on the direct route to Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. When D. H. Hill, at dawn on the 14th, re-enforced his two advance brigades in Turner's Gap, Stuart had gone, leaving one regiment of cavalry and some artillery under Rosser to guard Fox's Gap, a small one to the south of Turner's. As Hill reached the top of the mountain on that September morning a magnificent spectacle was presented. Far as the eye could reach flashed the bayonets of the advancing columns of McClellan's army. It was a sight not often vouchsafed to any one, and was both grand and sublime. Hill must have felt he
Daniel H. Hill (search for this): chapter 10
the Monocacy. He had been joined by the divisions of McLaws and D. H. Hill, which had been left at Richmond, but many of his men were obligeood and Jones to move to Hagerstown, west of the mountains, while D. H. Hill with his division should halt at Boonsboroa, where were parked mo3th informed Halleck that an order of General Lee's, addressed to D. H. Hill, had accidentally fallen into his hands, the authenticity of whicis commanders find its way to the headquarters of the enemy. General D. H. Hill was under Jackson's command. When the latter received Specia the 13th, on the ground that had been previously occupied by General D. H. Hill's division; and Private B. W. Mitchell, of Company F, Twenty-return with Longstreet's command to the Blue Ridge, to strengthen D. H. Hill's and Stuart's divisions, engaged in holding the passes of the moon the direct route to Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. When D. H. Hill, at dawn on the 14th, re-enforced his two advance brigades in Tur
James Ewell Brown Stuart (search for this): chapter 10
n he had anticipated, he determined to return with Longstreet's command to the Blue Ridge, to strengthen D. H. Hill's and Stuart's divisions, engaged in holding the passes of the mountains, lest the enemy should fall upon McLaws's rear, drive him from Maryland Heights, and thus relieve the garrison at Harper's Ferry. Stuart, who had occupied Turner's Gap with Hampton's brigade of cavalrythis gallant officer having rejoined his army-moved to Crampton's Gap, five miles south of Turner's, to reen Heights and Harper's Ferry. When D. H. Hill, at dawn on the 14th, re-enforced his two advance brigades in Turner's Gap, Stuart had gone, leaving one regiment of cavalry and some artillery under Rosser to guard Fox's Gap, a small one to the south ofh the mountains at that point, and threatening his rear at Maryland Heights. The work of these brigades and a portion of Stuart's cavalry was well performed; and when the fighting, which had been going on from twelve o'clock, ceased at night, Frankl
W. B. Taliaferro (search for this): chapter 10
l Run at Blackburn Ford, and up the left bank of that stream to Stone Bridge, where the Warrenton turnpike crosses, and Taliaferro, whose march Jackson in person accompanied, to the vicinity of Sudley Mills, north of Warrenton turnpike and west of Buentially a man of action, and never asked advice or called council. Move your division to attack the enemy, said he to Taliaferro; and to Ewell, Support the attack. The slumbering soldiers sprang from the earth. They were sleeping almost in ranks,ition to the four brigades of his division, he had two regiments of Doubleday's, and fought two of Ewell's and three of Taliaferro's brigades of Jackson's command. A. P. Hill's division was not engaged. It was an exhibition of superb courage and ex an inch, while brave men in blue and gray fell dead almost in each other's arms. Jackson's loss was heavy. Ewell and Taliaferro were both wounded, the former losing a leg, while King lost over a third of his command. The Federal commander held hi
Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 10
e. On August 25th Jackson, with three divisions of infantry, under Ewell, A. P. Hill, and W. B. Taliaferro, preceded by Munford's Second Viro at Warrenton Junction, ten miles away. The next day, leaving General Ewell's division at Bristoe to watch and retard Pope's march to open g many others. The remainder beat a hasty retreat. That afternoon Ewell was attacked by Hooker's division of Heintzelman's corps, who had bfficer were marching away from Manassas: A. P. Hill to Centreville, Ewell to the crossing of Bull Run at Blackburn Ford, and up the left bankve your division to attack the enemy, said he to Taliaferro; and to Ewell, Support the attack. The slumbering soldiers sprang from the earthis division, he had two regiments of Doubleday's, and fought two of Ewell's and three of Taliaferro's brigades of Jackson's command. A. P. H fell dead almost in each other's arms. Jackson's loss was heavy. Ewell and Taliaferro were both wounded, the former losing a leg, while Ki
the doomed garrison. The little village of Harper's Ferry lies in an angle formed by the Shenandoah and Potomac where their united waters break through the Blue Ridge Mountains. It is a troop trap unless defended by the adjacent heights. Colonel Miles had strongly fortified the ridge in Virginia called Bolivar Heights, lying between the rivers; but Maryland heights, the key to the situation, was only feebly garrisoned. At dawn on the 15th, in response to Jackson's order, a line of fire leaped from the mountain-crowned heights and told Colonel Miles, the Federal commander, in no uncertain tones, that his surrender was demanded. For two hours this plunging fire was maintained, and at the moment A. P. Hill advanced to storm the town from the Virginia side a white flag was displayed. The firing ceased, and Hill entered the village to receive the surrender of its garrison. Jackson's work was well done. Twelve thousand men stacked their arms. Seventy-three pieces of artillery, t
G. T. Anderson (search for this): chapter 10
onsboroa. This was done with artillery, dismounted cavalry, and charges of mounted squadrons. The object having been accomplished, the brigade was slowly withdrawn and placed on the left of the line of battle at Sharpsburg. While McClellan was attempting the passage of Turner's Gap with his main army, Franklin with the Sixth Corps, supported by Couch's division, was struggling to get through Crampton's Gap, where McLaws had left a brigade and regiment of his division, and a brigade of Anderson's, to prevent the enemy from passing through the mountains at that point, and threatening his rear at Maryland Heights. The work of these brigades and a portion of Stuart's cavalry was well performed; and when the fighting, which had been going on from twelve o'clock, ceased at night, Franklin had made such progress that they were withdrawn also. On the morning of the 15th, as McClellan was passing through the mountains near Boonsboroa, Franklin was marching through Crampton Pass at about
osition along the Centreville heights. He had been reenforced by the corps of Franklin, which arrived on the 30th, and Sumner on the 31st, and the divisions of Cox aer than Lee's, but there was more or less demoralization in the ranks. General Franklin, who arrived at Centreville on the 30th with his corps, threw out Slocum'sWhile McClellan was attempting the passage of Turner's Gap with his main army, Franklin with the Sixth Corps, supported by Couch's division, was struggling to get thren the fighting, which had been going on from twelve o'clock, ceased at night, Franklin had made such progress that they were withdrawn also. On the morning of the 15th, as McClellan was passing through the mountains near Boonsboroa, Franklin was marching through Crampton Pass at about the same time, and occupying Pleasant Valleyieve Miles at Harper's Ferry, who surrendered about half-past 7 that morning. Franklin declined to attack McLaws after reaching Pleasant Valley, remained there (the
nsferred Jackson by a circuitous march of fifty-six miles to a point twentyfour miles exactly in rear of Pope's line of battle. On August 25th Jackson, with three divisions of infantry, under Ewell, A. P. Hill, and W. B. Taliaferro, preceded by Munford's Second Virginia Cavalry, crossed the upper Rappahannock, there called the Hedgman River, at Hinson Mills, four miles above Waterloo Bridge, where the left and right of the two opposing armies respectively rested. The Foot cavalry were in ligh relieve the garrison at Harper's Ferry. Stuart, who had occupied Turner's Gap with Hampton's brigade of cavalrythis gallant officer having rejoined his army-moved to Crampton's Gap, five miles south of Turner's, to reenforce his cavalry under Munford there, thinking, as General Lee did, that should have been the object of McClellan's main attack, as it was on the direct route to Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. When D. H. Hill, at dawn on the 14th, re-enforced his two advance brigades i
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