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Dunavant (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, he gave away all the lands he had taken up, and settled at his own expense, to the servants he had fixed on them, some of whose descendants are now possessed of very considerable estates in that colony. After remaining some time in England he again visited Virginia with a fresh band of followers whom he also established there. He first settled in York County in 1641, where he was burgess and justice in 1647, and when later he removed to the Northern neck, between the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers, he filled the offices of Secretary of State and Member of the Privy Council. Of his loyalty to the house of Stuart we have already spoken, and of his various voyages, indicating in themselves his enterprising genius. When he made his will in London, in 1663, he was returning on what proved to be his last voyage. He had with him his large, young family, his eldest son John not yet being of age; but he was so determined to establish them in Virginia that he ordered an English estat
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ng of England, Scotland, France, Ireland, and Virginia two years before his restoration in England. motto to the Virginia Coat of Arms was En dat Virginia quintam until after the union of England and Scotland, when it was En dat Virginia quartam. The inscription on the tombstone of the second Ric is distinguished above all other counties in Virginia as the birthplace of genius, so, perhaps, no who married Colonel Grymes, of the Council of Virginia. Bishop Porteus, of England, was her uncle. 8 he was a member of the convention called in Virginia to consider the ratification of the Federal Cnia had a right to object; but, he exclaimed, Virginia is my country; her will I obey, however lamenit may subject me. When he was Governor of Virginia, six years before, his native State occupied f the United States or of obeying the will of Virginia, he drew his sword in defense of his mother Cegan he was stationed in Washington, but when Virginia seceded he did not hesitate to abandon the co[17 more...]
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Alexander or Caesar; for he thought an ardent excitement of the mind in defending menaced rights brings forth the greatest display of genius, of which, forty-four years afterward, his great son was an illustrious example. On June 18, 1817, from Nassau, he writes: This is the day of the month when your dear mother became my wife, and it is not so hot in this tropical region as it was then at Shirley. Since that happy day, marked only by the union of two humble lovers, it has become conspicuousf the impression made. At the expiration of nearly five years, finding that there was no hope of his ultimate recovery, he determined to return to his family and friends. In January, 1818, he took passage in a New England schooner bound from Nassau to New Providence and Boston. On nearing the coast of the United States he became so much worse that he requested the captain to direct his course to Cumberland Island, lying off the coast of Georgia. He knew that his former trusted friend, Gen
Amelia Island (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
lant, gifted, and honored dead. Henry Lee and Nathanael Greene now sleep but a short distance apart, where the recollections of their brave deeds and the grateful songs of the true lovers of liberty are caught up by the billows of a common ocean. Two months after the sick soldier landed he was dead. Every token of respect was shown by the United States Navy vessels in Cumberland Sound; their colors were put at half-mast, as well as the flags at the military headquarters of the army on Amelia Island. Citizens from the adjoining islands united in paying their respects. Commodore Henley, of the navy, superintended the last details. A full army band was in attendance, and Captains Elton, Finch, and Madison, and Lieutenants Fitzhugh and Ritchie, of the navy, and Mr. Lyman, of the army, acted as pall-bearers. Upon the stone marking his grave is this inscription: Sacred to the Memory of General Henry Lee, of Virginia. Obiit March 25, 1818, Aetat. 63. Not long before the war of 18
Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
in Virginia. The English volley lighted patriotic fires in the hearts of the colonists with the rapidity electricity flies in this age from the touch of the button. The sword was substituted for the law book in the hands of Henry Lee, and we find him, at the age of nineteen, after the battle of Lexington, a captain of cavalry, being nominated for that position by Patrick Henry, the orator of American liberty. He rose rapidly in his new career. In the Northern Department at Brandywine, Germantown, Springfield, and in the operations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, his address, cool courage, great ability, and unceasing activity as an outpost officer speedily drew the attention of his superiors. Congress recognized his services, promoted him, and gave him an independent partisan corps. Ever thereafter his position in the war was near the flashing of the guns. His duties kept him close to the enemy's lines, and his legion was what cavalry should be — the eyes and ears of
West Indies (search for this): chapter 2
k of the mob. The results of that night proved nearly fatal to General Lee, and were disgraceful to party spirit. The injuries he received at the hands of the excited mob prevented him from entering upon the campaign, obliged him to go to the West Indies for his health, and ultimately caused his death. While abroad, amid the fatal march of his disease, his heart turned ever to his home and family. His letters to his son, Charles Carter Lee, have been preserved, and are literary models, the said that after his arrival at Dungeness they still continued, and that a surgical operation was proposed as offering some hope of prolonging his life; but he replied that an eminent physician, to whose skill and care during his sojourn in the West Indies he was much indebted, had disapproved a resort to the proposed operation. His surgeon in attendance still urging it, he put an end to the discussion by saying: My dear sir, were the great Washington alive and here, joining you in advocating
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
s born in 1647, married Letitia Corbin, and died in 1714, leaving five sons and one daughter. His eldest son, Richard, the third of the name, married and settled in London, though his children eventually returned to Virginia. Philip removed to Maryland in 1700, and was the progenitor of the Lee family in that State. Francis, the third son, died a bachelor, but Thomas, the fourth, with only a common Virginia education (it could not have been much in those days), had such strong natural parts tupon its creator, the States. In 1786 he was a delegate to the Continental Congress. From 1792 to 1795 he was Governor of Virginia, and was selected by President Washington to command the fifteen thousand men from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland, who were sent into western Pennsylvania to quell what was known as the Whisky Insurrection, which he successfully accomplished without bloodshed. This rebellion grew out of a resistance to a tax laid on distilled spirits. Washington accompan
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
The English volley lighted patriotic fires in the hearts of the colonists with the rapidity electricity flies in this age from the touch of the button. The sword was substituted for the law book in the hands of Henry Lee, and we find him, at the age of nineteen, after the battle of Lexington, a captain of cavalry, being nominated for that position by Patrick Henry, the orator of American liberty. He rose rapidly in his new career. In the Northern Department at Brandywine, Germantown, Springfield, and in the operations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, his address, cool courage, great ability, and unceasing activity as an outpost officer speedily drew the attention of his superiors. Congress recognized his services, promoted him, and gave him an independent partisan corps. Ever thereafter his position in the war was near the flashing of the guns. His duties kept him close to the enemy's lines, and his legion was what cavalry should be — the eyes and ears of the army.
Shropshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
s I. He believed, however, from his inherited traditions and the Coat of Arms borne by his progenitors in this country, that his family came originally from Shropshire, England; and when the world rang with his name and fame, and he paid the usual penalty of greatness by being besieged with reiterated queries respecting his pedigref the second Richard Lee, at Burnt House Fields, Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland County, describes him as belonging to an ancient and noble family of Morton Regis in Shropshire. It is clearly established that the three earliest representatives of the family in America, Colonel Richard Lee and his two eldest sons, claimed this ShropshiShropshire County descent. It is our purpose to trace the Lees in America, not in England. The first emigrant, Colonel Richard Lee, is described as a man of good stature, of comely visage, enterprising genius, a sound head, vigorous spirit, and generous nature; and when he reached Virginia, at that time not much cultivated, he was so
ed up Sir William Berkeley's old commission — for the government of that province-and received a new one from his present Majesty, Charles II, a loyal action and deserving my commendation. Introductis ad Latinum Blasoniam. By John Gibbons, Blue Man-tel, London, 1682. It is also said that he offered the exiled monarch an asylum in the New World. It is certain that on the death of Cromwell he aided Governor Berkeley in proclaiming Charles II in Virginia King of England, Scotland, France, Ireland, and Virginia two years before his restoration in England. In consequence, the motto to the Virginia Coat of Arms was En dat Virginia quintam until after the union of England and Scotland, when it was En dat Virginia quartam. The inscription on the tombstone of the second Richard Lee, at Burnt House Fields, Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland County, describes him as belonging to an ancient and noble family of Morton Regis in Shropshire. It is clearly established that the three earliest represe
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