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Samuel B. Dick (search for this): chapter 6.41
night, Jackson's entire force fled from Fremont, crossed the bridge, burned it, and was free from the destruction that had threatened him. Jackson, on the morning of the 9th, with his army, attacked the now united detachments of Tyler and Carroll, and with his overwhelming force compelled the retreat of our small but gallant command. Jackson's own old Stonewall Brigade was first repulsed by Carroll's, and Jackson himself was compelled to rally and lead them back to the contest; then, with Dick Taylor's and other brigades and batteries, he forced our men from the field. See pp. 291-293 for details of the engagements at Port Republic and Cross Keys. On the 9th, at sundown, Shields, now with me, received by the gallant Myles W. Keogh As captain in the 7th United States Cavalry, Keogh was killed in the massacre, by the Sioux, of Custer's command, June 25th, 1876, on a branch of the Little Big Horn River, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade was orde
Robert S. Foster (search for this): chapter 6.41
leaving only a small force to guard that flank. To meet his masses, now moving to force Tyler back, regiments and batteries were drawn from our left to strengthen our center. The time having come for the decisive movement, my First Brigade, with the supports from the left, and Sullivan's, were made ready. Directing Colonel Sullivan to follow the movements of forces on our right, I ordered the line forward. With a quick move at right-half-wheel, the gallant fellows, under Harrow, Patrick, Foster, Murray, and Voris, with loud cheers, dashed forward through the terrific storm of shot and shell from the enemy's stone-wall and batteries; nor did they halt or falter until the enemy was driven from his protection, and his advancing lines were checked. Our line now had the wall so long held by Jackson. But soon the sturdy foe, reinforced, advanced again to retake the position; they were met by men as gallant and as determined as themselves, and in answer to their wild rebel yell loud che
irected by the general, by undertaking a like movement against me. Moving forward with infantry and artillery against Sullivan on the left and my own brigade on the right, he forced my skirmish line to retire until under cover of our main line and batteries, and still advanced until my fire compelled him to halt; then Carroll, Sawyer, and Voris were ordered forward from my lines, and their well-directed fire, with the storm of grape and canister poured from the well-managed guns of Clark's, Jenks's, and Robinson's batteries, forced the enemy to retreat to his former position. At 10 A. M., while I awaited his further movements, General Shields sent the following: Colonel Kimball: Major Armstrong informs me that the enemy at present occupies a position on an eminence on the right flank, also another on the left flank, leaving the center unsupported, which I take to be the Strasburg turnpike. If this be the state of the case, I would recommend to push a column of cavalry, four pie
Charles S. Hamilton (search for this): chapter 6.41
ed in the department under General McClellan's immediate control, comprising the field of operations of the Army of the Potomac, that is, northern Virginia. Banks's command was the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and consisted of two divisions, that of Hamilton, afterward Williams's, and Lander's, afterward Shields's. During the Peninsular campaign, Banks was given a separate command, the Department of the Shenandoah.--Editors. When our division arrived at Martinsburg on the 10th, General C. S. Hamilton's had moved forward, and was then advancing near Winchester. Expecting that the enemy would resist his farther advance, General Hamilton requested General Shields to push forward to his support. General Shields, complying, sent forward, on the evening of the 11th, his First Brigade (my own), which, after a night's hard march, united, early on the morning of the 12th, with Hamilton's division, and advanced with it, and at 2 P. M. General Hamilton's troops occupied the city and its d
Kimball's brigade was ordered into a newly fenced field for its camp, and no sooner were the men dismissed from ranks than the entire fence disappeared. General King, who was in command at this place, seeing this movement from his quarters at the Phillips Mansion, sent down an aide-de-camp to arrest all of our officers, and compel the men to rebuild the fence. Officers laughed and the men jeered at him. The rails were soon on fire, and our dinners cooking. King called up his adjutant, Major Barstow, who had been General Lander's adjutant when he commanded us, and ordered him to detail sufficient troops to arrest our whole division, exclaiming: Whooops from Western Virginia; you had better keep your guards here at headquarters, for you'll be devilish lucky if they don't steal your house-roof before morning! King was dumfounded, but his fence was never rebuilt. Editors. and Fremont beyond the Shenandoah mountains, Jackson, on the 23d, with his army of about 1500, dashed do
William Harrow (search for this): chapter 6.41
from his right, leaving only a small force to guard that flank. To meet his masses, now moving to force Tyler back, regiments and batteries were drawn from our left to strengthen our center. The time having come for the decisive movement, my First Brigade, with the supports from the left, and Sullivan's, were made ready. Directing Colonel Sullivan to follow the movements of forces on our right, I ordered the line forward. With a quick move at right-half-wheel, the gallant fellows, under Harrow, Patrick, Foster, Murray, and Voris, with loud cheers, dashed forward through the terrific storm of shot and shell from the enemy's stone-wall and batteries; nor did they halt or falter until the enemy was driven from his protection, and his advancing lines were checked. Our line now had the wall so long held by Jackson. But soon the sturdy foe, reinforced, advanced again to retake the position; they were met by men as gallant and as determined as themselves, and in answer to their wild re
Myles W. Keogh (search for this): chapter 6.41
ith Dick Taylor's and other brigades and batteries, he forced our men from the field. See pp. 291-293 for details of the engagements at Port Republic and Cross Keys. On the 9th, at sundown, Shields, now with me, received by the gallant Myles W. Keogh As captain in the 7th United States Cavalry, Keogh was killed in the massacre, by the Sioux, of Custer's command, June 25th, 1876, on a branch of the Little Big Horn River, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade waKeogh was killed in the massacre, by the Sioux, of Custer's command, June 25th, 1876, on a branch of the Little Big Horn River, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade was ordered at once to move forward, to be followed by Ferry's, then ten miles in my rear. At 10 o'clock on the morning of the 10th, after a terrible night's march, we reached Conrad's store, some six miles below the field of action, where I met our worn and defeated comrades of Tyler's and Carroll's commands; and here I formed a new line, and in position awaited the expected attack from Jackson, and the arrival of Ferry's brigade. Ferry came with our supports, but Jackson, having been severe
John C. Fremont (search for this): chapter 6.41
ut his fence was never rebuilt. Editors. and Fremont beyond the Shenandoah mountains, Jackson, on ivision to move back to the Shenandoah, while Fremont crossed the mountains to strike the army of Jof cannon away to our left toward Strasburg. Fremont had passed over the mountains and attacked Jan front, and Bayard's cavalry was sent to aid Fremont, Our division returned to Front Royal and encen mountain, while Jackson's army, pursued by Fremont, was moving up the valley, along the Staunton either to strike Jackson or communicate with Fremont. Shields's division reached Luray June 4th, south, and mine was 6 miles north of Luray. Fremont's and Jackson's guns were distinctly heard bebecause of the impassable river. On the 7th, Fremont forced the enemy from Mount Jackson, and purs it, was satisfied, now that he was free from Fremont, not to try conclusions with the division, unted him at Kernstown. In the afternoon General Fremont succeeded in communicating with General S[3 more...]
Erastus B. Tyler (search for this): chapter 6.41
es who can explain themselves when they come. Tyler's brigade has been ordered within supporting dred what cavalry I had to move to the right of Tyler's brigade and in support of it. When repulsed field toward the point to which I had ordered Tyler's brigade. The enemy's skirmishers, advancing, met Tyler's just as they were emerging from the wood and checked their advance. Tyler soon deplolank. To meet his masses, now moving to force Tyler back, regiments and batteries were drawn from iven from our line as it dashed forward. With Tyler's gallant brigade and our fearless little bandrroll reached the bridge at Port Republic with Tyler yet fifteen miles in rear. My brigade, under s army, attacked the now united detachments of Tyler and Carroll, and with his overwhelming force ce Big Horn River, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade was ordered at on where I met our worn and defeated comrades of Tyler's and Carroll's commands; and here I formed a [7 more...]
illips Mansion, sent down an aide-de-camp to arrest all of our officers, and compel the men to rebuild the fence. Officers laughed and the men jeered at him. The rails were soon on fire, and our dinners cooking. King called up his adjutant, Major Barstow, who had been General Lander's adjutant when he commanded us, and ordered him to detail sufficient troops to arrest our whole division, exclaiming: Who are these vandals? Why, said Barstow, they are Lander's old troops from Western Virginia;Barstow, they are Lander's old troops from Western Virginia; you had better keep your guards here at headquarters, for you'll be devilish lucky if they don't steal your house-roof before morning! King was dumfounded, but his fence was never rebuilt. Editors. and Fremont beyond the Shenandoah mountains, Jackson, on the 23d, with his army of about 1500, dashed down upon Banks's 9000, mostly stationed in detachments at Strasburg and Front Royal, nearly 20 miles apart, by the route Banks was forced to take. But not until after three days of hard fighti
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