hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,015 total hits in 158 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
Schuyler Hamilton (search for this): chapter 18
s visited at the Relay House by many Unionists from Baltimore, who gave him all desired information; and he received such communications from General Scott, on application, that he felt warranted in moving upon the town. He had informed Scott of the increasing power of the Unionists in Baltimore; reminded him that the city was in the Department of Annapolis; and expressed the belief that, with his force in hand at the Relay House, he could march through it. Colonel (afterward General) Schuyler Hamilton, who had accompanied the New York Seventh to Washington, was then on the staff of the General-in-chief. He had learned the metal of General Butler, and was not inclined to cast any obstacles in his way. The orders of General Scott, prepared by him, gave Butler permission to arrest secessionists in and out of Baltimore, prevent armed insurgents from going to join those already in force at Harper's Ferry, and to look after a large quantity of gunpowder said to be stored in a church in B
Frederick Christ (search for this): chapter 18
d day. --The History of the Civil War in America: by J. S. C. Abbott, i. 108. In contrast with this was the letter of a Baltimore mother to her loyal son, a clergyman in Boston, who, on, the Sunday after the attack on Fort Sumter, preached a patriotic discourse to his people. The letter was as follows:-- Baltimore, April 17, 1861. my dear son:--Your remarks last Sabbath were telegraphed to Baltimore, and published in an extra. Has God sent you to preach the sword, or to preach Christ? your Mother. The son replied:-- Boston, April 22, 1861. dear Mother:--God has sent me not only to preach the sword, but to use it. When this Government tumbles, look amongst the ruins for your Star-Spangled banner son. and within ten days from the time of its departure, full ten thousand men of the city of New York were on the march toward the Capital. John Sherman, now (1865) United States Senator from Ohio, was then an aid-de-camp of General Patterson. He was sent by that
lay House, within nine miles of Baltimore, seized the railway station there, spread over the hills in scouting parties, and prepared to plant cannon so as to command the Washington Junction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway at the great viaduct The Relay House in 1864. over the Patapsco Valley, and the roads leading to Baltimore and Harper's Ferry. General Butler accompanied the troops, and established a camp on the hills, a quarter of a mile from the Relay House, near the residences of P. O'Hern and J. H. Luckett. The writer visited this interesting spot late in 1864. Brigadier-General John R. Kenly, whose meritorious services in Baltimore will be noticed presently, was then in command there. On the bights back of the Relay House, near which General Butler encamped, was a regular earthwork, called Fort Dix, and a substantial block-house built of timber, which is seen in our little picture. It was a commanding position, overlooking the narrow valley of the Patapsco above the via
Bainbridge (search for this): chapter 18
nt. The arrival of the Massachusetts troops was just in time to save the Constitution. Communication was speedily opened between General Butler and Captain Blake, and a hundred of the troops, who were seamen at home, with the Salem Zouaves as a guard, were detailed to assist in getting the Constitution from the wharf, and putting her out beyond the bar in a place of safety. With the help of the Maryland, acting as a tug, this was accomplished. That venerable vessel, in which Hull, and Bainbridge, and Stewart had won immortal honors in the Second War for Independence, was built in Boston, and was first manned by Massachusetts men; now she was preserved to the uses of the Government, for whose sovereignty she had gallantly fought, by the hands of Massachusetts men. This, said General Butler, in an order thanking the troops for the service, is a sufficient triumph of right; a sufficient triumph for us. By this the blood of our friends, shed by the Baltimore mob, is so far avenged. W
ens of thousands of armed men hurrying across Maryland to the defense of the Government, recovered, in the presence of this new danger, from the paralysis produced by the terrible events of the 19th, and were aroused to action. A Home Guard of Unionists was formed in Frederick, under the direct observation of the disloyal Legislature. Similar action was taken in other parts of the State, especially in the more northern portion; and, on the evening of the 4th of May, an immense Union meeting wearty shouts of welcome. These were the first of that immense army that streamed through Baltimore without hinderance, thousands after thousands, while the great war that ensued went on. General Butler was visited at the Relay House by many Unionists from Baltimore, who gave him all desired information; and he received such communications from General Scott, on application, that he felt warranted in moving upon the town. He had informed Scott of the increasing power of the Unionists in Bal
s were written in March, 1861, just after President Lincoln's Inaugural Address reached Europe, and when the legislative proceedings a nd public meetings in the Free-labor States were just made known there, and gave assurance that the great body of the Nation was loyal and would sustain the incoming Administration. Speaking of the departure of Mr. Lincoln for Washington, and the farewell to his friends and neighbors, mentioned on page 275, the Count exclaims: What a debut for a Government! Haven there been many inauguration s here below of such thrilling solemnity? Do uniforms and plumes, the roar of cannon, triumphal arches, and vague appeals to Providence, equal these simple words, Pray for me! We will pray for you. Ah! courage, Lincoln! the friends of freedom and of America are with you. Courage! you hold in your hands the destinies of a great principle and of a great people. Courage! you have to resist your friends and to face your foes; it is the fate of all who seek to d
Simon Cameron (search for this): chapter 18
ned, unnecessary. The Lieutenant-General thought that the Brigadier had used too daringly the absolute power accorded to a commander of a department, unless restricted by specific orders or military law, and overlooking, for the moment, the immense advantages gained for the Government by such exercise of power, he insisted upon the recall of General Butler from Baltimore. It was done. Viewed in the light of to-day, that recall appears like an almost fatal mistake. I always said, wrote Mr. Cameron, then Secretary of War, from St. Petersburg, many The Department of Annapolis. months afterward, that if you had been left in Baltimore, the rebellion would have been of short duration. Parton's General Butler at New Orleans, page 117. There was no rebuke :in President Lincoln's recall of General Butler from Baltimore, in compliance with the wishes of General Scott. On the contrary, it had the appearance of commendation, for he immediately offered him the commission of a Major-
James Parton (search for this): chapter 18
. He telegraphed to the Governor to send the Boston Light Battery to Annapolis to assist in the march on Washington. General Butler in New Orleans, &c.: by James Parton, page 71. Colonel Lefferts did not feel at liberty to accept General Butler's proposition, and the latter made preparations to go on with the Massachusettsal commanding a Department. Absolute, replied the Lieutenant-General; he can do whatever he thinks best, unless restricted by specific orders or military law. Parton. Butler ascertained that Baltimore was within his Military Department, and, with a plan of bold operations teeming his brain, he returned to Annapolis. At the St. Petersburg, many The Department of Annapolis. months afterward, that if you had been left in Baltimore, the rebellion would have been of short duration. Parton's General Butler at New Orleans, page 117. There was no rebuke :in President Lincoln's recall of General Butler from Baltimore, in compliance with the wishes
Alexander T. Stewart (search for this): chapter 18
val of the Massachusetts troops was just in time to save the Constitution. Communication was speedily opened between General Butler and Captain Blake, and a hundred of the troops, who were seamen at home, with the Salem Zouaves as a guard, were detailed to assist in getting the Constitution from the wharf, and putting her out beyond the bar in a place of safety. With the help of the Maryland, acting as a tug, this was accomplished. That venerable vessel, in which Hull, and Bainbridge, and Stewart had won immortal honors in the Second War for Independence, was built in Boston, and was first manned by Massachusetts men; now she was preserved to the uses of the Government, for whose sovereignty she had gallantly fought, by the hands of Massachusetts men. This, said General Butler, in an order thanking the troops for the service, is a sufficient triumph of right; a sufficient triumph for us. By this the blood of our friends, shed by the Baltimore mob, is so far avenged. We will add, th
order to testify the acceptance by the Federal Government of the fact, that the city and all the well-intentioned portion of its inhabitants are loyal to the Union and the Constitution, and are to be so regarded and treated by all. How came Butler and his men on Federal Hill? was a question upon thousands of lips on that eventful morning. They had moved stealthily from the station in the gloom, at half-past 7 in the evening, piloted by Colonel Robert Hare, of Ellicott's Mills, and Captain McConnell, through Lee, Hanover,, Montgomery, and Light Streets, to the foot of Federal Hill. The night was intensely dark, made so by the impending storm. The flashes of lightning and peals of thunder were terrific, but the rain was withheld until they had nearly reached their destination. Then it came like a flood, just as they commenced the ascent of the declivity. The spectacle was grand, said the General to the writer, while on the Ben Deford, lying off Fort Fisher one pleasant evening
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...