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Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ion of property in Selma, 518. capture of Montgomery and Columbus, 519. La Grange's expedition to West Point capture of Fmbigbee River, the columns simultaneously menaced Columbus, in Mississippi, and Tuscaloosa and Selma, in Alabama. At thatalry, was on the Mobile and Ohio railway, west of Columbus, in Mississippi, and so rapid was Wilson's march through Alabama,hoochee River, the boundary between Alabama and Georgia,--Columbus, in the latter State, ninety miles distant, being his chigomery and Atlanta while the main column passed on toward Columbus. That city was on the east side of the Chattahoochee, anouri then seized another and perfect bridge, leading into Columbus, when Upton made another charge, sweeping every thing bef their iron-clad gun-boats, then lying twelve miles below Columbus. In the mean time, La Grange had pushed on to West Poin the same day, Minty's (late Long's) division moved from Columbus for the same destination, and Upton's marched the next da
Milwaukee (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
The gun-boat Cherokee got within range of the works at the beginning, and, at intervals throughout the siege, hurled a 100-pound shell into the fort. The squadron did good service, not only in shelling the works, but in driving the Confederate vessels so far to-ward the city, that their fire failed to reach the besiegers. The National vessels kept up a steady fire all day, and retired at night to anchorage at Great Point Clear. In these operations of the squadron, two of the gunboats (Milwaukee and Osage) were destroyed by torpedoes. When, on the 3d of April, the Nationals had built an earth-work and mounted large guns upon it within two hundred yards of the fort, the latter was completely and closely invested, and its doom was sealed. Yet the garrison fought bravely on, and the besiegers suffered greatly from the shells, for the lines were at short range from the fort. At length Canby determined to make a grand assault by a concentric fire from all his heavy guns, his field
Alabama river (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
refuge in the swamps, but nearly all of them were captured. he fled up the Alabama River, with nine thousand men, on gun-boats and transports. General Veatch took rage as the men could carry, for the purpose of occupying Claiborne, on the Alabama River, to prevent troops coming down to the relief of Mobile. He left on the 5th of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensive iron founderies. The march of Cheath page. It lay upon a gently rolling plain, about one hundred feet above the Alabama River, and was flanked by two streams; one (Beech Creek) with high and precipitoutgomery. He. directed Major Hubbard to construct a pontoon bridge over the Alabama River, at Selma, which had been made brimful by recent rains, and then he Ruinsancient capital of Alabama, This was the place where De Soto crossed the Alabama River, on his march toward the Mississippi River, which he discovered in the year
Blakely (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
Fort, on Mobile Bay, 510. fortifications at Blakely, 511. battle of Blakely, 512. evacuation of cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, ten miles north of Mobile, destroying, on ttion after that until he reached the front of Blakely, April 1. where he received supplies from Gety of reducing this work before passing on to Blakely; and, on the following morning, March 27. beops then formed the extreme right in front of Blakely. Thatcher's squadron had moved up the bay paof the city. The army turned its face toward Blakely, on the east bank of the Appalachee, an insigicularly Hawkins's negro division, had held Fort Blakely, as the works there were called, in a state Some of the gun-boats attempted to go up to Blakely, but were checked by a heavy fire from Forts enemy to fight. On the day after the fall of Blakely, Maury ordered the evacuation of Mobile; and he received an order from Canby to return to Blakely, he had one hundred and fifty captives. the a
Crawfordsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ay, and the passengers were many. Among them the writer had the pleasure of discovering two highly-esteemed friends, Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Hart, of Troy, New York, who were then members of General Wool's family. traveling for the purpose of seeing the country; and he enjoyed their most agreeable companionship many days, until parting at New Orleans. We had just reached the beginning of the more picturesque hill-country of Georgia, which seemed to be peculiarly charming in the region of Crawfordsville, the home of Stephens, the Vice-President of the Confederacy, whose house we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed many evidences of the devastating hand of Sherman, when he began his march to the sea, in the ruins of railway stations, twisted iron rails, and charred ties, along the road-side. Toward evening the grand dome of Stone Mountain, a heap of granite fifteen hundred feet in height, loomed up a mile or so north of us. From Decatur onward, the ear
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
mbus, in Mississippi, and Tuscaloosa and Selma, in Alabama. At that time General Forrest, in com the Confederates made their appearance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consi was straining every nerve to reach and defend Selma, which was one of the most important places inates were routed, and fled in confusion toward Selma, leaving behind them two guns and two hundred prisoners. Wilson's loss in the capture of Selma was about 500 men. His gains were the importanct a pontoon bridge over the Alabama River, at Selma, which had been made brimful by recent rains, was the appearance of a portion of the city of Selma, when the writer sketched it, in April, 1866. river, from which Wilson, on his march toward Selma, had liberated many Union captives, and which to recapture the prisoners Wilson had taken at Selma, and was arrogant in manner and speech. The lo places of most Ruins at the Landing place, Selma. historic interest, within and around it. Its[15 more...]
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
West Point at the crossing of the Chattahoochee River by the railway connecting Montgomery and Atlanta while the main column passed on toward Columbus. That city was on the east side of the Chattahd at Augusta early in the morning, and after breakfast took seats in a very comfortable car for Atlanta. It was a warm, pleasant day, and the passengers were many. Among them the writer had the plePresident of the Confederacy, whose house we saw on an eminence to the right. As we approached Atlanta, we noticed many evidences of the devastating hand of Sherman, when he began his march to the srties were seen in thickening lines, and at twilight we were in the midst of the ruined city of Atlanta, then showing some hopeful signs of resurrection from its ashes. We passed a rainy day in AtAtlanta, the writer leaving the examination of the intrenchments and the battle-fields around it until a second visit, See page 404. which he intended to make a few weeks later, and on the morning o
Great Point (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
, twenty heavy guns, and six field-pieces were brought to bear upon the fort. The gun-boat Cherokee got within range of the works at the beginning, and, at intervals throughout the siege, hurled a 100-pound shell into the fort. The squadron did good service, not only in shelling the works, but in driving the Confederate vessels so far to-ward the city, that their fire failed to reach the besiegers. The National vessels kept up a steady fire all day, and retired at night to anchorage at Great Point Clear. In these operations of the squadron, two of the gunboats (Milwaukee and Osage) were destroyed by torpedoes. When, on the 3d of April, the Nationals had built an earth-work and mounted large guns upon it within two hundred yards of the fort, the latter was completely and closely invested, and its doom was sealed. Yet the garrison fought bravely on, and the besiegers suffered greatly from the shells, for the lines were at short range from the fort. At length Canby determined to
Bridgeville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
f the Tombigbee River, the columns simultaneously menaced Columbus, in Mississippi, and Tuscaloosa and Selma, in Alabama. At that time General Forrest, in command of the Confederate cavalry, was on the Mobile and Ohio railway, west of Columbus, in Mississippi, and so rapid was Wilson's march through Alabama, that the watchful and .expert enemy could not reach him until he was far down toward Selina. Forrest put his men in instant motion, to meet the danger. He sent Chalmers by way of Bridgeville toward Tuscaloosa. Hearing of this, March 27, 1865. Wilson put his forces in rapid motion, with ample supplies, for Montevallo, beyond the Cahawba River. Arriving at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of burning the public property and destroying founderies and factories there. The adventures of that brigade, which did not rejoin the main body until the expedition had ended, we shall consider presently. Upton's division was i
Eutaw (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
st from Elyton, together with three guns and about fifty prisoners. Then he destroyed the military school and other public property there, and leaving Tuscaloosa, burned the bridges over the Black Warrior, and pushed on southwesterly, to Eutaw, in Greene County. There he was told that Wirt Adams was after him, with two thousand cavalry. He was not strong enough to fight them, so he turned back nearly to Tuscaloosa, and pushing northeastward, captured Talladega. Near there he encountered and ty miles in extent, in the space of thirty days, not once hearing of Wilson and the main body during that time. He found no powerful opposition in soldiery or citizens, anywhere, excepting at a place called Pleasant Ridge, when on his way toward Eutaw, where he had a sharp skirmish with some of Adams's men, then on their way to join Forrest. The attack was made by Adams, first upon the Sixth Kentucky Cavalry. The Second Michigan gave assistance, and finally bore the brunt of the attack, and
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