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nfederate forces in Virginia at this time. advance of General McClellan. reported movement of McDowell. battle of seven Pines. I assumed my new command on the 17th. The arrival of Smith's and Ldent had placed Brigadier-General J. R. Anderson, with nine thousand men, in observation of General McDowell, who was at Fredericksburg with forty-two thousand men; Brigadier-General Branch, with four In the afternoon a party of cavalry left near Fredericksburg by General Anderson, to observe McDowell's movements, reported that his troops were marching southward. As the expediency of the junctnstructions for the expected battle, General Stuart, who had a small body of cavalry observing McDowell's corps, reported that the troops that had been marching southward from Fredericksburg had retugeneral engagement depended on the probability of so great an accession to McClellan's force as McDowell could bring, this intelligence induced me to abandon the intention of attacking, and made me fa
d the open field, as the enemy was in force in front as well as to the left of Fort Magruder. About five o'clock General Early sent an officer to report that a battery, that had been firing upon Fort Magruder and the troops near it, was near inred to General Longstreet in my presence, and he referred it to me. I authorized the attempt, but enjoined caution in it. Early's brigade advanced in two equal detachments, commanded, one by Major-General Hill, and the other by himself. They were separated in a thick wood, and General Early, in issuing from it, found a redoubt near and in front of him. He attempted an assault, in which he was severely wounded, after which his two regiments were quickly defeated, with a loss of nearly four hunhe two Confederate regiments that attacked it — an attack due to the fact that its existence was unknown to us, until General Early, issuing from a wood, came upon it suddenly. The army had no ambulances, and the wagons had moved on in the morni
ruder's divisions by the Warwick road, through Williamsburg, and G. W. Smith's and D. H. Hill's by that from Yorktown-the movement to begin at midnight, and the rear-guard, of cavalry, to follow at daybreak. Information of this was sent to Commodore Tatnall, commanding the iron-clad Virginia, and Captain Lee, at the navy-yard, and instructions were sent to Major-General Huger to march to Richmond. The four divisions were assembled at Williamsburg about noon of the 4th. Magruder's divisionon in May, this suggestion was repeated more than once, but was never noticed in the replies to my letters. Intelligence of the destruction of the iron-clad Virginia was received on the 14th. I had predicted that its gallant commander, Commodore Tatnall, would never permit the vessel to fall into the hands of the enemy. The possession of James River by the naval forces of the United States, consequent upon this event, and their attack upon the Confederate battery at Drury's Bluff, suggest
for the Federal troops, commanded by an officer of tried courage, fought as soldiers usually do under good leaders, and time and vigorous efforts were required to drive them from their position. But the resolution of Garland's and George B. Anderson's brigades, that pressed forward on the left through an open field, under a destructive fire; the admirable service of Carter's and Bondurant's batteries, and a skillfully combined attack upon the Federal left, under General Hill's direction, by Rodes's brigade in front, and that of Rains in flank, were finally successful, and the enemy abandoned their intrenchments. Just then reinforcements were received from their second line, and they turned to recover their lost position. But to no purpose — they were driven back, fighting, upon their second line-Couch's division at Seven Pines. R. II. Anderson's brigade, transferred by Longstreet to the first line, after the capture of Casey's position, bore a prominent part in the last contest.
S. S. Lee (search for this): chapter 5
form a powerful army near Richmond, of all the available forces of the Confederacy, to fall upon McClellan's army when it should come within reach. Major. General Huger was instructed, at the same time, to prepare to evacuate Norfolk, and Captain S. S. Lee, commanding the navy-yard at Gosport, to remove to a place of safety as much of the valuable property it contained as he could. On Saturday, the 3d of May, the army was ordered to fall back, on information that the Federal batteries wouburg, and G. W. Smith's and D. H. Hill's by that from Yorktown-the movement to begin at midnight, and the rear-guard, of cavalry, to follow at daybreak. Information of this was sent to Commodore Tatnall, commanding the iron-clad Virginia, and Captain Lee, at the navy-yard, and instructions were sent to Major-General Huger to march to Richmond. The four divisions were assembled at Williamsburg about noon of the 4th. Magruder's division, temporarily commanded by Brigadier-General D. R. Jone
Archer Anderson (search for this): chapter 5
ven days was only that which I had commanded. It is very far from the truth. General Lee did not attack the enemy until the 26th of June, because he was employed, from the 1st until then, in forming a great army, by bringing, to that which I had commanded, fifteen thousand General Holmes told me in General Lee's presence, just before the fight began on the 31st, that he had that force ready to join me when the President should give the order. I have also the written testimony of Colonel Archer Anderson, then of General Holmes's staff, that he brought that number into General Lee's army. men from North Carolina, under Major-General Holmes, General Ripley gave me this number. He brought the first brigade--five thousand men. General Lawton told me that his was six thousand, General Drayton that his was seven thousand; there was another brigade, of which I do not know the strength. twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand from the Valley in th
B. S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 5
, crossing the Nine-miles road; and Smith's in reserve, behind Hill's left and Magruder's right. Generals Jackson and Ewell, the former commanding as senior officer, were then opposing General Banks, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, still under ne thousand by detachments to Branch and J. R. Anderson. On leaving the Rapidan, I had requested Generals Jackson and Ewell to send their letters to me through the Adjutant-General's office. These papers must have been acted upon in Richmond, took the road by Front Royal, to turn the Federal army. His movement was so prompt as to surprise the enemy completely. Ewell, who was leading, captured most of the troops at Front Royal, and pressed on to Winchester, by the direct road, with his f which I do not know the strength. twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand from the Valley in the divisions of Jackson and Ewell, which the victories of Cross Keys and Port Republic had rendered disposable.
manded by Brigadier-General D. R. Jones in consequence of the illness of the major-general, passed the night of the 5th at Diascund Bridge; that of Major-General Smith at Barhamsville, twelve miles from New Kent Court-House; those of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, with the cavalry, at Williamsburg, as has been said. In Federal dispatches of the 6th many prisoners are claimed to have been taken. The Confederate officers were conscious of no other losses of the kind than the captures made by Hancock, from the Fifth North Carolina and Twenty-fourth Virginia regiments. The cavalry rear-guard, following all the byroads and paths parallel to the main road, found no lurkers or stragglers from Longstreet's and Hill's divisions. The day after the action those troops marched at daybreak, and Stuart's at sunrise, and encamped soon after noon at the Burnt Ordinary, twelve miles from Williamsburg; Smith's and Magruder's divisions were stationary; Colonel Fitzhugh Lee, who was observing York
George B. Anderson (search for this): chapter 5
stinate; for the Federal troops, commanded by an officer of tried courage, fought as soldiers usually do under good leaders, and time and vigorous efforts were required to drive them from their position. But the resolution of Garland's and George B. Anderson's brigades, that pressed forward on the left through an open field, under a destructive fire; the admirable service of Carter's and Bondurant's batteries, and a skillfully combined attack upon the Federal left, under General Hill's directiointrenchments. Just then reinforcements were received from their second line, and they turned to recover their lost position. But to no purpose — they were driven back, fighting, upon their second line-Couch's division at Seven Pines. R. II. Anderson's brigade, transferred by Longstreet to the first line, after the capture of Casey's position, bore a prominent part in the last contest. Keyes's corps, united in this second position, was assailed with such spirit by the Confederate troops
The remainder of the afternoon and the evening were devoted to burying the dead and providing for the comfort of our wounded, who, with many of those of the Federal army, who had been captured, were placed in hospitals and private residences in Williamsburg. Longstreet's and Hill's divisions slept on the field. The Confederate loss was about twelve hundred killed and wounded. The proportion of the former was unusually small; but it included Colonel Mott, Nineteenth Mississippi, and Colonel Ward, Second Florida regiment. The Confederate officers, who saw the ground upon which the dead and wounded of both parties lay, supposed that of the enemy to be from three to five times greater than ours. General Hooker, on oath before the committee on the conduct of the war, said that his division alone lost seventeen hundred men. About four hundred unwounded prisoners, ten colors, and twelve field-pieces, were taken from the enemy. We had the means of bringing off but five of these guns.
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